Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.

If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 1320Al-Andalus and the Perception of Luxury in Medieval Spain
Session 316Approaches to Poverty and Wealth in German Language and Literature
Session 322Authority and Social Differentiation in the Medieval Far North
Session 1530Battlegrounds of Cohabitation: Jewish-Christian Relations in Literature and Culture
Session 612Central Asia: Samarqand, Self-Image, and the Silk Route
Session 1610Chaucer, II: Gender, Genres, Speech Acts
Session 1521Circulation of Wealth
Session 1604Cosmology, Astronomy, and Divination
Session 823Crusading is Not Just Battle: Material and Iconographic Aspects of the Crusades
Session 1504Dialectics and Concepts of Time in the High Middle Ages
Session 312Franciscans, Inquisitors, and Problems of Wealth and Poverty
Session 124Gender, Place, and Identity
Session 1310Mappings, IV: Reading and Translating Medieval Space
Session 1115Marginally Poor
Session 1520Material Wealth?: Christian Responses from Late Antique and Carolingian Literature
Session 123Monastic Living: Concept, Building, and Imagery
Session 504Moving up and Moving down in the Islamic World
Session 323Poor and Rich in Town and Country
Session 1524Possibilities of Political Identity in Italy under Hohenstaufen Rule
Session 623Poverty and Wealth in 13th- and 14th-Century Rural England
Session 103Poverty and Wealth in High Medieval Iberia
Session 617Poverty and Wealth in Late Antique Christianity, II
Session 115Poverty and Wealth in Vernacular Literature
Session 1516Poverty, Wealth, and the Theatre
Session 223Rich and Poor Non-Humans in Anglo-Saxon England
Session 614Romanian Matters: And Why They Matter
Session 1303Saints' Cults and Symbolic Identities: Central European Cults of Saints - Local, Regional, National, 'International', III
Session 330'Scolpire l'architettura', Sculpting Architecture: Richness and Poverty in the Cistercian Abbeys of Center-North Italy, 12th-14th Centuries, II
Session 324The Acquisition of Wisdom and Knowledge
Session 720The Material Culture of Poverty and Wealth
Session 1621The Morality of Money: Lending, Welfare, and Identity through the Market
Session 1506The Politics of the Frontier: Contrasting Perspectives from Al-Andalus and Crusader Syria
Session 1502The Realm of Norway and Its Dependencies, I
Session 1319The Revival of Medieval Drama and Cultural Transformation
Session 820Wealth and Ownership in Seljuk and Ottoman Border States
Session 1223Wealth and Power, Wealth or Power: The Rich, the Poor, and Social Status in Late Medieval Towns
Session 1018Wealth and Trade in the Mediterranean and beyond

Session details

Session

1320
TitleAl-Andalus and the Perception of Luxury in Medieval Spain
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorDepartamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
 
OrganiserFrancisco de Asís García García, Departamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
 
Moderator/ChairMónica Ann Walker Vadillo, Department for Continuing Education, University of Oxford
 
Paper 1320-a Power and Luxury in Late Medieval Castilian Palaces: Between the Andalusi Tradition and European Influences
(Language: English)
Elena Paulino Montero, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut, Firenze
Paper 1320-b Textile Magnificence in Andalusian Palatine Spaces
(Language: English)
Sila Oreja Andrés, Departamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
 
AbstractAl-Andalus meant a distinguished space of culture and aesthetic refinement in medieval Iberia. These aspects were reflected, among other factors, in the appreciation that sumptuary works and books got in andalusi society. The Christian kingdoms were also fascinated by that imaginary of luxury, which was reflected in the artistic patronage of the monarchs and the nobility. Castilian palaces offer a good example of how Al-Andalus played an important role in the shaping of a lavish image among these elites.

Session

316
TitleApproaches to Poverty and Wealth in German Language and Literature
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairArnold Otto, Stadtarchiv, Nürnberg
 
Paper 316-a Armut und Reichtum in den deutschen Predigten des Berthold von Regensburg
(Language: Deutsch)
Katrin Wenig, Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Düsseldorf
Paper 316-b Owê ich armer Dieterîch! - 'Heimatverlust' in Heldenliteratur: Bloße historische Tatsachenbeschreibung oder synonymisch für 'Verlustängste im Mittelalter?
(Language: Deutsch)
Jörg Füllgrabe, Institut für deutsche Literatur und ihre Didaktik, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Unter den von Berthold von Regensburg in seinen deutschen Predigten angeprangerten Lastern und Sünden spielt für ihn die der avaritia, also die der Habgier, eine zentrale Rolle. Sehr häufig schildert er Ausprägungen solcher gîtikeit, also der Raff- und Habgier, des Wuchers und der Spekulation mit Geld.

In dem geplanten Vortrag soll ein Überblick über die von Berthold in diesem Zusammenhang angeprangerten konkreten Vergehen gegeben werden. Dabei wird auch zu untersuchen sein, auf welchen realhistorischen Hintergrund Berthold sich bezieht und inwieweit das von ihm geforderte rechte Verhalten seiner Idealvorstellung gesellschaftlichen Zusammenlebens, das Parallelen zur scholastischen Soziallehre aufweist, entspricht.

Paper -b:
'Armut' scheint im Kontext der Heldendichtung ein unpassendes oder zumindest unerwartetes Attribut zu sein. Gleichwohl taucht sie in der Heldendichtung - etwa im Zusammenhang mit dem Verlust von Land und Herrschaft, aber auch treuer Gefolgsleute - immer wieder auf; gipfelnd in der Dietrichtradition in dem Ausruf: 'Wie sol ich nû gebâren? Owê ich armer Dieterîch!' So gesehen ist der literarische Held in seiner Tragik häufig durch Armut aber gleichzeitigem Stolz geprägt. Mag dieser Topos womöglich aber auch Abstiegsängste des Adels oder später Bürgertums widergespiegelt haben? Die Beliebtheit dieser Texte gerade im späteren Verlauf des Mittelalters ließe sich vielleicht genau so deuten…

Session

322
TitleAuthority and Social Differentiation in the Medieval Far North
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorCreating the New North Research Programme, Universitetet i Tromsø
 
OrganiserRichard Holt, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
 
Moderator/ChairRichard Holt, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
 
Paper 322-a Fashionable Fishermen: The Archaeology of Rich and Poor in North-Norwegian Fishing Villages
(Language: English)
Inga Malene Bruun, Institutt for arkeologi og sosialantropologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Paper 322-b Social Differentiation among the Sami Hunters and Fishermen of North-Norway
(Language: English)
Lars Ivar Hansen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
 
AbstractIn Norway, a pattern of authority based upon local chieftains, rather than landowning aristocrats, long persisted and influenced the nature of developing monarchical power. The north had an economy which was not primarily agricultural. The Norse population lived largely by fishing, and the later medieval growth of coastal settlements dependent entirely on stockfish sales to the European market was a distinctive feature. Archaeology reveals patterns of social differentiation within those settlements. The export income of the Church, from the sale of the fish it received in land rents and tithes, paid for an impressive array of imported devotional art to decorate local churches. The Sami population throughout the Middle Ages based their economy on hunting; even so social differences developed.

Session

1530
TitleBattlegrounds of Cohabitation: Jewish-Christian Relations in Literature and Culture
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAnnette Weber, Lehrstuhl für Jüdische Kunst, Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg
 
Paper 1530-a Battlegrounds of Blood and Semen: Leviticus 15 in William of Auvergne's De Legibus
(Language: English)
Sean Murphy, Department of Liberal Studies, Western Washington University
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In De legibus, a lengthy treatise on the laws of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, William of Auvergne, university master and then bishop of Paris (1228-1249), emphatically and repeatedly defends the value of the Law of Moses understood according to the letter. William's defense of a thoroughgoing literal interpretation of the Law, though unusual, follows both Christian and Jewish precedents; Abelard (1079-1142) and Maimonides (1135-1204) are probable direct influences on William. And, though William rejects most vehemently the continued observance in Christianity of certain commands of the Law - the practice of circumcision has become an 'abomination' that, along with animal sacrifice and the sabbath rest, now constitutes a kind of idolatry for Christians, where it was once a guard against idolatry for Jews - he simultaneously embraces the continued observance of 'the greater part' of the commands, including non-moral commands of the Law. His impassioned engagement with Leviticus 15 and its teachings on the impurity associated with male and female genital discharges (semen and other discharges from the penis, menstrual blood and other bloody discharge from the vagina), as well as the rites of purification associated with such discharges, is an important case in point. His many arguments for the rationality of a levitical teaching on the literal impurity of menstrual blood, for example, include some that he seems to think apply only in ancient times and others - especially the ever present threat of sex-related idolatry - that are applicable in every age. Though William does not explicitly counsel the continued observance of the levitically mandated rites of purification from menstrual blood or other genital discharges, he admits the reality of such impurity and, thus, the necessity of purification among contemporary Christians as among ancient Jews.

Session

612
TitleCentral Asia: Samarqand, Self-Image, and the Silk Route
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairGeoffrey Humble, School of Medicine, University of Leeds
 
Paper 612-a The Impact of the Silk Route Trade on Local Economies
(Language: English)
Berenike Walburg,
 
AbstractPaper -a:
This paper will examine the economic impact the Silk Route trade had on local communities, focusing the analysis chronologically on the Umayyad and Abbasid period, and geographically on Central Asia. The evidence afforded by the literary evidence will be compared to that provided by the archaeological remains in order to ascertain the degree of interaction between long-distance traders and the local commercial networks of the cities that were way stations on the caravan route, and the extent of the economic advantages afforded to the local communities by this interaction.

Session

1610
TitleChaucer, II: Gender, Genres, Speech Acts
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAnna Czarnowus, Faculty of Philology, University of Silesia, Katowice
 
Paper 1610-a 'So Queynt a Sweven': Confession, Gossip, and Chaucer's Poetics of Idling in The Book of the Duchess
(Language: English)
Adin Lears, Department of English, Cornell University
Paper 1610-b 'Mi lordis tente serveth me not thus!': Obscene Scribal Innovation in 15th-Century Manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales
(Language: English)
Carissa M. Harris, Department of English, Northwestern University
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In The Book of the Duchess, Chaucer shades the speech between the Dreamer and the Black Knight with the dual discursive modes of confession and of gossip. In doing so, he confirms the continuity of each man's melancholic infirmity to the end of the poem. Yet ultimately, Chaucer offers a partial consolation that embraces melancholic idleness through a circular figure evoking creative production. This 'poetics of idling' moves the flat and repetitive formulations of grief previously conveyed toward spiral dimensionality and relief. Indeed, through the queer relational network among the two men and the dead Whyte Chaucer articulates a kind of redeeming productivity in the melancholy and the idle.

Paper -b:
Chaucer is notorious for his creative use of multiple terms for intercourse and genitalia in the Canterbury Tales, ranging from the ambiguous 'queynte' to the unequivocally obscene 'swyvit'. One particular scribe of the British Library's late-15th-century Harley MS 1758 enthusiastically expands upon Chaucer's obscenity, embellishing the already-explicit Merchant's Tale by adding his own additional iterations of 'swyvit' and a rich variety of genital terms. This paper examines how one medieval reader responded to Chaucer's obscenity, offering insight into the workings of prurient creativity and obscene literary innovation in 15th-century England.

Session

1521
TitleCirculation of Wealth
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAlaric Hall, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of English, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1521-a Gold Gone to the Wolves, and Children to Gold: Atlakviða and the Dark Side of Wealth Circulation in Old Norse Poetry
(Language: English)
Filip Missuno, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In the Old Norse poem Atlakviða, a treasure and its guardians are lost to wolves, snakes and darkness; their avenging sister Guðrún feeds her covetous king morsels of his own children and scatters his own gold. The fates of both treasure(s) and children merge within Guðrún's distortion of the wealth-receiving equation. Structural and thematic parallels in Germanic verse contribute to the interpretation that the poem's echoic semantics of darkness weaves into the heroic frame a liminal, chthonic dimension in which to pervert the social significance of treasure-giving and thematize gold and enrichment as reflective images of doom and death.

Session

1604
TitleCosmology, Astronomy, and Divination
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMark Kauntze, Department of Classics, Northwestern University
 
Paper 1604-a Albert the Great's Cosmic Theology and His Debt to Averroes
(Language: English)
Adam Takahashi, Center for the History of Philosophy & Science, Radboud University Nijmegen
Paper 1604-b The Broken Circle: Islamic Divinatory Sciences in the Latin World, 12th-15th Centuries
(Language: English)
Valerio Cappozzo, Medieval Studies Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In the De caelo et mundo, which is a paraphrase of Aristotle's On the Heavens, Albert the Great (ca. 1200-80) presented a new perspective on Aristotelian cosmology. Under the decisive influence of both Arabic Aristotelians and Hermetic literature, Albert transformed Aristotle's original ideas by attributing a special role to God as the prime cause of all sublunary forms. My paper not only aims to examine Albert's cosmological doctrines but also to present a case-study for understanding the transformation of Aristotelian philosophy in the Arabic-Latin commentary tradition.

Paper -b:
This paper analyzes the connections between the Islamic divinatory sciences and Italian Medieval dream-books. More specifically, it focuses on the
Latin translations of Islamic symbols related to dreams, their integration into Christian culture and the erasure of their origins due to Catholic
censorship. My aim is to track the Islamic roots of these buried symbols in several Italian miscellanies from the 12th to the 15th century.

Session

823
TitleCrusading is Not Just Battle: Material and Iconographic Aspects of the Crusades
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairSini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
 
Paper 823-a Gaming and Gambling on the Crusades
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Paper 823-b Dining on Crusade: Sire de Joinville's The Life of Saint Louis and Food
(Language: English)
Kristina Hildebrand, School of Education, Humanities & Social Sciences, Halmstad University
 
AbstractPaper -a:
There is ample evidence that the crusaders of all ranks filled their free time by playing games, especially with dice and usually for money. This pastime, however, was viewed with suspicion as an expression of the sin of greed, a way of undermining personal finances, and as a potentially dangerous distraction at the time of war. In my presentation I will discuss legislative attempts to limit the practice of gambling on the crusades and the representations gamblers in the chronicles of the crusades in the 12th and 13th centuries.

Paper -b:
The number of culinary mss preserved indicates an extensive interest in food and cooking in the Middle Ages. Food also appears in other texts, though rarely defined clearly: 'all of the best' is a common expression. However, in Joinville's The Life of Saint Louis, eating is presented as both social interaction and as a deliberate exclusion from a social context. Food and eating also serve as a reminder of time of year in a different climate, and as an example of the exotic and different world of Outremer. This paper looks at the various meanings conveyed in Joinville's text through food and eating.

Session

1504
TitleDialectics and Concepts of Time in the High Middle Ages
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMatthew Treherne, School of Languages, Cultures & Societies - Italian, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1504-a Has the Future Already Come About?: An Investigation into Early Medieval Conceptions of Time, c. 900-1140
(Language: English)
Alisa Koonce, Trinity College, University of Cambridge
Paper 1504-b The Presence of the Past in the Future: Merlin Reconstructs Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain
(Language: English)
Karen Sullivan, Division of Languages & Literature, Bard College, New York
 
AbstractPaper -a:
According to some medieval theories of time, the future exists simultaneously with the present and the past. One result of such an usual theory is that a person who was rich, at present lost his wealth, and in the future will acquire it again, is paradoxically both rich and poor at once. My paper investigates this conception of time which developed within the writings of those influenced by Boethian natural philosophy (c. 900-1140); my paper analyses the reasons why such a theory was held, opponents of the theory, and its further consequences, specifically as it applies to economic fortunes.

Paper -b:
If there is anything that distinguishes Merlin in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia regum Britanniae it is his relation to time. While the British kings with whom Merlin is interacting in this text understand time as a series of sequential moments, unanticipated, as they hover in the future, and forgotten, as they fall into the past, Merlin understands time as an eternal present, rendered meaningful by his knowledge of what is to come and what has gone by. He knows, for example, that if one wants warriors who have recently fallen in battle to be remembered in the distant future, one must commemorate them with enormous stones from the distant past. What is it about a marvel (which is what Stonehenge is perceived as being in Geoffrey's text) that breaks down the boundaries of past, present, and future? How does Merlin's conception of time resemble learned conceptions of time in the twelfth century, and how does it differ from them? What fantasy of time does his extraordinary knowledge of past and future reflect?

Session

312
TitleFranciscans, Inquisitors, and Problems of Wealth and Poverty
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMelanie Brunner, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Paper 312-a Poverty, Piety, and Heresy Confiscations: Temptation and the Medieval Italian Inquisition
(Language: English)
Jill Moore, Independent Scholar, London
Paper 312-b Saints and Richness in Franciscan Order: The Case of the Sermons on St Anthony of Lisboa
(Language: English)
Eleonora Lombardo, Instituto de Filosofia, Universidade do Porto
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Medieval Italian inquisitors from the Franciscan and Dominican orders were sworn to personal poverty and austerity, but in the course of their work handled large sums of money in confiscations from convicted heretics. Some well-known scandals resulted in Florence and the Veneto. Using unpublished sources, this paper explores how inquisitors in Italy in the late 13th and early 14th centuries reconciled the challenges of their conflicting obligations and handled the temptation of riches.

Paper -b:
Biographies and chronicles speaking about Francis of Assisi and other members of Franciscan order stress their choice of poverty and richness. Earlier sermons, however, are cautious in presenting it. An interest case of study to understand how Franciscan choice of poverty was used to mark the devotion to the new saints is that of some sermons for the feast of Saint Anthony of Lisboa. This paper focuses on sermons presenting either the conversion of Anthony either his miracles to analyse the way the dichotomy poor - rich in this saint's life was adapted to a more general speech about usury and money.

Session

124
TitleGender, Place, and Identity
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairFarouk F. Grewing, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Mittel- und Neulatein, Universität Wien
 
Paper 124-a The Elision of Shrine and Saint in Lydgate's Miracles of St Edmund and Harley 2278
(Language: English)
Robyn Malo, Department of English, Purdue University
Paper 124-b 'Women Saints of our Contrie of England': Anglo-Saxon Female Saints' Lives and the Development of Englishness
(Language: English)
Kerryn Olsen, Department of History, University of Auckland
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In Lydgate's Miracles of St Edmund, the shrine functions an important sign for Bury's communal identity and Edmund's prowess. As this paper argues, by focusing on the shrine and not on the relics, Lydgate implicitly presents the shrine as able to signify better than relics. Hence, while Lydgate trumpets Edmund's mystical power, he presents this power as inhering not in Edmund's remains, but rather in the shrine. Lydgate's text thereby complicates the received wisdom about medieval perceptions of relics. He does not quite follow the model we might expect - emphasizing the potency even of the smallest fragment of Edmund's body, or presenting the entire body as the unmediated spot for accessing God's grace. Instead, Lydgate subordinates the body itself to the monument at Bury.

Paper -b:
In the search for an emerging English identity in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, scholars have studied the vitae of male saints for elements of Englishness. However, the Anglo-Saxon female saints' vitae have been largely overlooked. This paper begins to redress the imbalance, approaching the vitae of Sts. Æthelthryth of Ely, Edith of Wilton, and Eadburh of Nunnaminster as potential sources of English identity. It further considers the effects which a female audience may have had on reading Anglo-Saxon saints' vitae, and how this may have helped disseminate a sense of Englishness among the educated women on post-Conquest England.

Session

1310
TitleMappings, IV: Reading and Translating Medieval Space
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorHistorisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
 
OrganiserFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
Moderator/ChairFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
Paper 1310-a E-Mapping Medieval Iberia: Two Different Approaches
(Language: English)
Julio Escalona, Instituto de Historia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid
Paper 1310-b Time and Space According to Orosius?: The Velletri/Borgia World Map, 15th Century
(Language: English)
Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
AbstractReading and Translating Medieval Space falls under the rubric 'Mappings' that also comprises other sessions in a proposed series that the organizers hope will become a regular feature of the conference and, in so doing, advance the study of the history of cartography and space. Medievalists can tap into a wide range of sources to examine the perception and representation of space in our period, but these can be difficult for us to understand in the proper, medieval sense. On the other hand, certain means that we tend to consider essential to spatial representation (e.g., modern mapping techniques) did not exist in this period. The papers of this session will use different approaches to read more or less well-known sources with a methodologically fresh eye to approach the question: how possible is it to 'translate' medieval sources into our contemporary descriptive and cartographic languages and conventions of spatial representation?

Session

1115
TitleMarginally Poor
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserAnna A. Grotans, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Ohio State University
 
Moderator/ChairAnna A. Grotans, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Ohio State University
 
Paper 1115-a Poor People in Papal Ceremony: The Evidence of Glosses
(Language: English)
Jörg Bölling, Seminar für Mittlere und Neuere Geschichte, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen / Institut für Katholische Theologie, Universität Hildesheim
Paper 1115-b Reform and Property Management in Late Medieval Women's Convents in Southern Germany
(Language: English)
Melanie Hömberg, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
 
AbstractThe papers in this section investigate perceptions of and issues related to poverty based upon texts that traditionally have been considered marginal, in some cases literally so: hitherto unknown glosses, commentaries and unpublished archival documents. The first paper analyzes glosses to Juvenal's Satires and the influence of Christian ethics on interpretations of figures such as the poor poet and student; the second investigates perceptions of the poor in glosses to a practical text dealing with papal ceremony. The third contextualizes perception of the poor in the reality of late medieval life by discussing how German convents dealt with the realities of poverty in their own houses and what measures were taken in order to sustain the prescribed religious way of life.

Session

1520
TitleMaterial Wealth?: Christian Responses from Late Antique and Carolingian Literature
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserHelen Kaufmann, Oriel College, University of Oxford
 
Moderator/ChairCarole E. Newlands, Department of Classics, University of Colorado Boulder
 
Paper 1520-a Sacra Fames: Poverty in the Monastic Vitae by Athanasius and Jerome
(Language: English)
David Movrin, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
Paper 1520-b How to Praise a Villa: Sidonius Apollinaris and Venantius Fortunatus
(Language: English)
Helen Kaufmann, Oriel College, University of Oxford
 
AbstractIn this session the question of material wealth will be explored in three case studies from late antique and Carolingian Christian literature, each combining the discussion of the topic in (a) particular text(s) with questions of the literary tradition. The first paper will investigate the ways in which two landmark Christian hagiographers used lack of material wealth in the presentations of their monastic protagonists. In the second paper, descriptions of royal lavishness in Christian epics such as Ermold the Black's In Honour of Emperor Louis will be read against their classical models as a way of expressing power and status. Finally, the last paper will focus on the question how some Christian poets describe and praise 'villae' in view of Statius' influential model.

Session

123
TitleMonastic Living: Concept, Building, and Imagery
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJulian Gardner, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick
 
Paper 123-a Myths and Realities in the Archives of Bégard Abbey in Brittany, 1130-1476
(Language: English)
Claude Lucette Evans, Department of Language Studies, University of Toronto, Mississauga
Paper 123-b Living Like Monks: Monastic Images among the Laity in the Later Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Colleen Thomas, Research & Innovation, University College Dublin
 
AbstractPaper -a:
A thorough study of the Bégard documents kept in Breton archives (1130-1476) has made it clear that they present an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate view of the history of the abbey. The reasons for the disappearance of some charters transcribed in the 1707 Histoire de Bretagne and 1756 Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de la Bretagne and in manuscripts of the Blancs-Manteaux collection (BnF mss français) will be discussed as well as the undeserved credit given by historians to the 17th-century Chronique de Bégard which might not be reliable as it is not corroborated by medieval documents or by the Statuta Ordinis Cisterciensis.

Paper -b:
When the signature composition of the Egyptian monks Paul and Antony, credited as the first Christian hermits, first developed in western art it served as an emblem of monastic practice and was confined to use by Christian institutions. Towards the end of the Middle Ages, the image reappeared in two types of codices: book of hours manuscripts and printed editions of the Legenda Aurea. The former allowed those who could afford to commission the books to affect the discipline of monks, without the bother of actual poverty. As Paul and Antony were not in the usual canon of saints comprising the suffrages section, their very appearance in a book of hours was a luxury. The Legenda Aurea was a popular work that detailed the lives of the saints and was a favourite project for early printers. When illustrations were used, the Paul and Antony composition was almost always included. An investigation of the use of this composition reveals not only the connections made by art across time but also the slippage between social contexts that images allowed in the Middle Ages.

Session

504
TitleMoving up and Moving down in the Islamic World
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairHugh Kennedy, Department of Linguistics, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
 
Paper 504-a Wealth and Poverty as Phases in a Life Cycle: A Sample Survey of Medieval Arabic Writing
(Language: English)
Julia Bray, Département d'Études Arabes, Université Paris VIII - Vincennes-Saint-Denis
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Achieving wealth or falling into poverty is a very common theme of medieval Arabic story-telling and historiography, but one that has not yet been the subject of any specific discussion or survey. This paper will establish a sample corpus of real and imagined life-cycles in which the gaining or losing of wealth is what gives a life its moral meaning.

Session

323
TitlePoor and Rich in Town and Country
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
Paper 323-a Impoverished Free Peasants in 13th-Century Property Disputes
(Language: English)
Janice Musson, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Paper 323-b Inheritance, Conspicuous Consumption, and Named Drinking Vessels in Late Medieval England
(Language: English)
Chris Woolgar, Department of History, University of Southampton
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The paper considers the circumstances and possible motivations of very poor but free litigants of both sexes as revealed in the early records of suits of novel disseisin, or recent dispossession. Neither poverty nor gender prevented involvement in the action, which was tried by judge and jury in royal central courts. Both assize and court were instituted by Henry II and barred to the unfree. The research complements recent work by Morris and Reynolds inter alia on medieval attitudes towards the individual and authority, particularly the monarchy. The records date from 1194.

Paper -b:
In the later Middle Ages, among goods that passed from generation to generation in upper-class families we can identify a distinctive group of items, usually metalwork and often drinking vessels, which had individual names. From cups for wassail, belcheer, and blessing, to those with family names or links (e.g. ‘Hill', ‘Edward'), these items constituted important elements in inheritance and connected conspicuous displays of wealth at meals and drinkings with family. This paper surveys these items, their function, the names and their meanings, and the ways in which items like this might reinforce family connections, ceremonial and magnificence.

Session

1524
TitlePossibilities of Political Identity in Italy under Hohenstaufen Rule
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserDaniel Russell, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München / Bayerisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, München
Georg Vogeler, Zentrum für Informationsmodellierung, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
 
Moderator/ChairGeorg Vogeler, Zentrum für Informationsmodellierung, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
 
Paper 1524-a The Impact of the First Crusades Fought in Northern Italy on the Lombard League, 1248-58
(Language: English)
Gianluca Raccagni, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1524-b Discordia terminata?: Peace Treaties in North-Eastern Italy
(Language: English)
Anja Thaller, Institut für Geschichte, Mittelalter und Historische Hilfswissenschaften, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
 
AbstractThe section studies the identities and political options of Italian cities and monasteries under Hohenstaufen rule. In her paper Cristina Andenna deals with the Cistercian monasteries during the escalating struggle between papacy and empire in the reign of Sicily from the end of the 12th to the mid of the 13th century. It analyses whether the abbots and monks could keep their close relationship to the imperial court under the pressure of the order's decisions to bind themselves to the papacy. Gianluca Racagni examines the changes within the organisation of the Lombard League after the welding of its alliance with the Papacy and the launch of the crusade against Frederick II in 1239. In her paper Anja Thaller analyses aspects of symbolic, oral and written communication and the effectiveness of peace treaties between the patriarchy of Aquileia and its neighbours, with a focus on the period from the mid 12th to the mid 13th century.

Session

623
TitlePoverty and Wealth in 13th- and 14th-Century Rural England
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMiriam Müller, Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham
 
Paper 623-a Strategies for Success: Upward Mobility and the Estate Books of Henry de Bray
(Language: English)
Daniel Jamison, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto
Paper 623-b Prosperity, Subsistence, Pauperage: Villagers in Palgrave, c. 1270-1439
(Language: English)
David Routt, Department of History, University of Richmond, Virginia
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The estate books of Henry de Bray document the rise of a Northamptonshire freeholder out of the upper peasantry and into the gentry over the course of roughly fifty years (1285-1330). Although modern scholarship typically describes this farmer and rentier as a gentleman, that title accurately describes Henry's rank only after a long career dedicated to expanding his estate and reducing his obligations. This paper outlines the strategies employed by Henry in pursuit of higher social and economic status; in the context of these activities, I will specifically discuss the permeability of landlord-lessee boundaries and the transfer of rights and privileges from landlords to ambitious peasants.

Paper -b:
This paper contributes to a recent return to the sources and to detailed local studies in order to deepen and clarify the understanding of relative affluence and poverty of peasants both before and following the Black Death. Palgrave (Suff.) provides a case-study of how to employ imperfectly preserved court and account rolls in conjunction with other materials in order to delve into the indirect indices of affluence and deprivation: the size of individual holdings; villagers' expropriation of seigneurial resources, of extra-manorial property, and of one another's possessions; circumvention of manorial monopolies; overburdening of commons; indebtedness; and access to markets.

Session

103
TitlePoverty and Wealth in High Medieval Iberia
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJosé Antonio Jara Fuente, Departamento de Historia, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca
 
Paper 103-a On the Categories of 'Rich' and 'Poor' in the Legislative and Literary Works Commissioned by Alfonso the Wise
(Language: English)
Berit Skock, Zentrum für Mittelalter- und Renaissancestudien, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Paper 103-b Rank, Wealth, and Display of Power in the Kingdom of Aragon
(Language: English)
Alexandru Stefan Anca, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Abstract withheld by request.

Paper -b:
The following paper deals with an important aspect of the display of power in the medieval Kingdom of Aragon. The Crone of Aragon depended on the financial support of her subjects and the majority of her achievements are due to this support. The kings display their power by means of ever increasing court and a permanent developing ceremony. Self portrayal of rank and wealth played an important role with regard to the king self-awareness. The monarch could use in moments of crisis a different image, of one who is able to give over wealth and rank in order to achieve political support. These aspects of the interchangeability of those images are the subject of my paper.

Session

617
TitlePoverty and Wealth in Late Antique Christianity, II
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairRalph Mathisen, Department of History, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
 
Paper 617-a Voluntary Poverty in the Family of Macrina and Gregory of Nyssa and Its Relationship to the Issue of Slavery
(Language: English)
Ilaria Ramelli, Department of Theology & Religion, Durham University / Department of Philosophy, Theology & Religious Studies, Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Detroit / Max-Weber-Koleg für Kultur- und Sozialwissenschaftliche Studien, Universität Erfurt
Paper 617-b Pope Gregory's Attack on Excessive Feasting
(Language: English)
John R. C. Martyn, School of Historical Studies, University of Melbourne
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The kind of poverty that was elected by Macrina and other members of her very rich family, and is exalted in the writings of her brother Gregory of Nyssa, is certainly a voluntary poverty. This choice, which is related to a broader choice for asceticism in a proto-monastic environment, and which is presented by Nyssen as an emulation of the life of angels and an anticipation of the final apokatastasis, is also closely linked with the repudiation of slavery. Indeed, I argue that the sole delegitimization of the institution of slavery in antiquity came from ascetics, in both Judaism and ancient Christianity, and was connected with voluntary poverty and service to others.

Paper -b:
In letter 2.17, sent in March 592, Pope Gregory the Great castigated the elderly bishop of Salona, Natalis, for his excessive feasting. Despite their earlier friendship, the Pope could not accept the bishop's all too frequent, all too lavish banquets, not because of their expense, but because of their extent, giving the bishop no time to study the bible or to prepare sermons, and encouraging him to show no respect for those placed over him - like the Pope. In the long letter 2.44, sent in July 592, the Pope renewed his attack, answering the bishop's justifications for banquets found by him in the Old Testament, and suggesting that Natalis was quite happy to be called a glutton, his main pleasure during banquets coming from criticizing those absent, attacking them with mockery, and enjoying inane tales of secular affairs, not the words of Holy Scripture.

Session

115
TitlePoverty and Wealth in Vernacular Literature
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairChristopher Fletcher, Laboratoire de Médiévistique Occidentale de Paris (LAMOP - UMR 8589), Université Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne
 
Paper 115-a The Erotics of Inequality: Courtly Love and Economic Disparity in the High Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Fidel Fajardo-Acosta, Department of English, Creighton University
Paper 115-b Salvation and Wealth: Political Economy in the Middle High German Rolandslied
(Language: English)
Kathrin Gollwitzer-Oh, Institut für Deutsche Philologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The increased availability of luxury commodities in European courtly settings during the High Middle Ages significantly widened the gaps between rich and poor and encouraged deep divisions in medieval society. While berating the rustic and unrefined, courtly literature invested the 'domna' - the noble lady decked in silks and jewels and enjoying finely spiced foods, perfumes, and other exotic goods - with an aura of intense eroticism and vast social and spiritual elevation. Inseparable from matters of wealth and status, the 'fin amor' of the troubadours prefigured western Romantic passions and the libidinal dynamics of wealth-seeking and upward mobility of the modern commercial world.

Paper -b:
In comparison to the Old French Chanson de Roland, Konrad's composition is considered to be primarily a literary portrayal of the crusader propaganda. Although the economics of salvation overlay both narration and discourse, other cultral concepts of meaning and coherence, especially distinctive to the heroic epos, are still narratively productive. This paper focuses on the economics of trade, people, and, first of all, riches used within the narration and by the protagonists. By contrasting the economics of salvation with the economics of wealth the different semantics that govern the text are to be revealed.

Session

1516
TitlePoverty, Wealth, and the Theatre
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMargaret Rogerson, Department of English, University of Sydney
 
Paper 1516-a The Root of Evil in Representations of Judgment Day
(Language: English)
Thomas L. Long, School of Nursing, University of Connecticut
Paper 1516-b 'Rich' and 'Poor', 'Giants' and 'Pigmies' in The Pleasant Comedy of Patient Grissil (1599): An Onstage Renaissance Criticism of the Griselda Legend
(Language: English)
Chi-Fang Sophia Li, Department of Foreign Languages & Literature, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan
 
AbstractPaper -a:
This paper serves as the background for a paper I will present at the Bible in the 17th-Century Conference in York the week prior to IMC 2011. This paper performs a rhetorical analysis of literary representations of the soul's judgment after death (either individual judgment or general judgment at Doomsday) in morality plays, mystery plays, sermons and other texts in order to determine how their catechetical purposes are served through a critique of wealth and its use or abuse. In teaching medieval listeners and readers about virtues and vices, to what extent do these texts represent the love of money as the root of evil?

Paper -b:
This paper examines the language of 'high' and 'low', 'rich' and 'poor', 'king' and 'clown', 'giants' and 'pigmies' in Dekker, Chettle, and Haughton's Patient Grissil (1599), terms the play sets up for character re-visions, social re-construction, and hierarchical reversal of the medieval Griselda legend. Citing from the Sienese painting of the story of patient Griselda (c. 1493) the iconic moments and the scenes paradoxically left unpainted and distanced in the background, this paper revisits the play's iconographic moments and its highlighted vernacular subject matter in conjunction with Chaucer's Clerk's Tale. This paper aims to create a dialogue between art and theatre arts, literature and performance, workshop practices and theatrical collaboration, performance theatre and theatre of domestic trials in relation to the medieval and Renaissance traditions of carnival and theatre.

Session

223
TitleRich and Poor Non-Humans in Anglo-Saxon England
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorCentre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
 
OrganiserJames Antonio Paz, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
 
Moderator/ChairClare A. Lees, Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London
 
Paper 223-a To Have and Have Not in the Forests of Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Michael Bintley, Department of English, Theatre & Creative Writing, Birkbeck, University of London
Paper 223-b Animism, Aristocracy, and the Animal Guardian: Images of the Boar in Beowulf
(Language: English)
Carl Kears, Department of English, King's College London
 
AbstractIn what ways could a non-human be rich or poor in Anglo-Saxon England? This session will look at whether human experiences of 'wealth' and 'poverty' are relevant to the lives of animals, artifacts, and other non-human entities. Speakers will consider the manner in which these non-humans construct human understanding of what it means to be rich or poor, but also take into account the treatment and day to day existence of the non-humans themselves. Can we easily map such terms as 'wealthy' or 'poor' onto a bird, a beast, a tree, a helmet, a relic? Do these nonhumans reinforce or disrupt divisions between rich and impoverished humans?

Session

614
TitleRomanian Matters: And Why They Matter
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMarco Mostert, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
 
RespondentAnna Adamska, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
 
Paper 614-a Writing as a Tool in Changing and Reinforcing Social Boundaries in 16th-Century Wallachia
(Language: English)
Mariana Goina, Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University, Moldova
Paper 614-b Burials and Death in Transylvania, 10th-12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Ioan Marian Ţiplic, Departamentul de Istorie, Patrimoniu și Teologie Protestantă, Universitatea 'Lucian Blaga', Sibiu
 
AbstractPaper -a:
My paper illustrates how, in a context of a quasi-illiterate society, a struggle for land between small (peasant) landowners and noblemen owning great estates brought about the use of writing. The great crisis of the accumulation of land estates into great latifundia, which marks Wallachia's 16th century, led to the gradual impoverishment of small landholders. As available land was scarce and kin relatives enjoyed the right of pre-emption, the only way for noblemen to acquire free peasant's land was to became a part of the peasant's community through the practice of 'fraternal adoption' (which transformed two strangers into blood brothers). As this practice belonged to the realm of uncustomary land inheritance, it needed the approval of the prince, and it demanded the support of written evidence. At their turn, peasants wishing to protect themselves from powerful 'brothers' with the potential legal right to purchase their land and freedom, turn to the use of written documents to take out their land from communal ownership and secure it individually.

Paper -c:
The archeological research of the early Middle Ages in Transylvania is extremely important due to the fact that the historiography of this period has limited possibilities of referring to contemporary documentary proof concerning the events of the 9th-12th centuries.
The chronological limits fixed for this short review have in view the entire period of occupation of the Transylvanian space by the Hungarian ducal authority which ended with the formation of local ethnicity through the fusion of various elements belonging to allogeneous or local groups. There are various examples of discoveries such as the Blandiana group A and B (9th-11th centuries), Ciumbrud group (9th century), Cluj group (the end of the 9th century - the first half of the 10th century), the Dridu - Alba Iulia group - Statia de Salvare II (9th-10th centuries) and Ciugud group (11th-12th centuries).
In the intra-Carpathian territory between the 9th and the 12th century we have to do with more cultural areas that define more ethnic elements. These cultural areas were ethnically established on the basis of the burial rite and ritual. K.Horedt named the following cultural groups: Blandiana A or Dridu-Alba Iulia (Slavs-Bulgarians), Ciumbrud (Christian Moravian Slavs), Cluj (early Hungarian), Blandiana B-Alba Iulia (Christian mixed population), Ciugud (Slav-Romanian population). Beside those, Gh.Baltag introduces in the field literature the so-called mountainous culture that defines the local Romanic population during the 8th-10th centuries, that used to live in the regions with an altitude between 600-800 meters. He also brought proofs of ceramics elements from the settlement in Albesti, Mures County.

Session

1303
TitleSaints' Cults and Symbolic Identities: Central European Cults of Saints - Local, Regional, National, 'International', III
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorDepartment of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
 
OrganiserGábor Klaniczay, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
 
Moderator/ChairNils Holger Petersen, Department of Church History, Københavns Universitet
 
RespondentCristian Gaspar, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
 
Paper 1303-a St John of Trogir and the Symbols of an Urban Community
(Language: English)
Ana Marinković, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Zagreb
Paper 1303-b National Saints in International Competition: Selection and Structure of the Hungarian Angevin Legendary
(Language: English)
Béla Zsolt Szakács, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
 
AbstractThe two sessions will concentrate on the question, how cults of saints reflected and shaped local, regional, and national identities. This will be analyzed for different regions of Central Europe with the help of comparative approaches and case studies. The papers will also deal with the continuation and disruption of local saints' cults, with emerging national contexts and the involvement into supraregional contexts.

Session

330
Title'Scolpire l'architettura', Sculpting Architecture: Richness and Poverty in the Cistercian Abbeys of Center-North Italy, 12th-14th Centuries, II
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorCîteaux: commentarii cistercienses, Pontigny
 
OrganiserTerryl N. Kinder, Cîteaux: Commentarii cistercienses, Pontigny
 
Moderator/ChairDavid Bell, Department of Religious Studies, Memorial University of Newfoundland
 
Paper 330-a Benedetto de Blachis and His History of Chiaravalle Milanese Abbey: A Rediscovered Manuscript and Its Edition
(Language: English)
Marisa Addomine, Registro Italiano Orologi da Torre, Milano
Paper 330-b The Rebirth of the Chiaravalle Clock: A Possible Model According to Leonardo's Drawings and the De Blachis Description
(Language: English)
Daniele Pons, Aries Consulting, Milano
 
AbstractIn this session the enquiry into Italy's Cistercian past will move to Lombardy in the north where the architecture of Morimondo (1134), Chiaravalle Milanese (1135, founded by Bernard of Clairvaux), and Cerreto Lodigiano (1136) will be explored, along with the smaller abbeys of Acqualunga and Capolago. The subsequent history of Chiaravalle Milanese will then be developed through a late 16th c. history written by a lay brother which describes connections to Milanese nobles and the wider world, as well as a the external appearance of the abbey's clock, also seen by Leonardo. A virtual reconstruction of the clock will be presented.

Session

324
TitleThe Acquisition of Wisdom and Knowledge
Date/TimeMonday 11 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairBabette Hellemans, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
Paper 324-a The Study Tour as Worthy Labor in the World of Vitas Patrum
(Language: English)
Sue Ellen Holbrook, Department of English, Southern Connecticut State University
Paper 324-b Humility in a Competitive World: Exploring Attitudes towards Learning in Late 12th-Century Paris
(Language: English)
Jenny Weston, Institute for Cultural Disciplines, Universiteit Leiden
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Despite the Martha & Mary syndrome, intellectual labor is not necessarily considered worthy of remuneration. I examine attitudes towards and forms of labor and its rewards involved in taking a trip to study with an esteemed Christian ascetic, especially itineraries which move the student to more than one such expert. The texts come mainly from Vitas Patrum (ed. Rosweyde 1617), such as the History of the Monks in Egypt, Sulpicius's Dialogues, and Sayings of the Fathers.

Paper -b:
In the popular 12th-century learning manual, the Didascalicon, Hugh of St Victor argues, 'the wise student gladly hears all, reads all, and looks down upon no writing, no person, no teaching' (Book 3, Chap. 13, tr. Jerome Taylor). According to Hugh, the more the humble student learns the closer he comes to spiritual enlightenment. Only a few decades later, however, Hugh's successor Godfrey of St Victor openly condemns various contemporary masters and their methods of learning in his didactic poem, the Fons philosophiae. This paper explores Godfrey's pedagogical 'change of heart' and his critical attitude towards non-Victorine programs of learning in the late 12th century. Was it possible to maintain a humble attitude towards learning in a world of increasing intellectual competition?

Session

720
TitleThe Material Culture of Poverty and Wealth
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJohn Cherry, Independent Scholar, Ludlow
 
Paper 720-a Pottery Evidences in South Italy: A View on Wealth and Poverty in Medieval Society
(Language: English)
Nicola Busino, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Seconda Università di Napoli
Paper 720-b In Search of Splendour
(Language: English)
Georgina Muskett, Department of Antiquities, National Museums Liverpool
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Pottery fragments, coming from more than thirty years of archaeological researches in post-classical sites in South Italy, offer an interesting testimony about wealth and poverty in Medieval societies of this Mediterranean area, by explaining progressive ascent of upper classes': if its presence appears less clear after the end of the ancient world, as the villas' system collapsed, it already comes up between the end of 12th and the half of the following century. As the centuries go by, pottery became a real status symbol, within the growth of new social strata, often coming in peninsula from other countries.

Paper -b:
The contrast between the rich institutions of pre-Reformation England and the poor is starkly revealed by the use of rare materials in the manufacture of objects in ecclesiastical treasuries. As so few of these artefacts survived the Reformation, National Museums Liverpool is fortunate to have in its collections an exceptionally rare object in this category. This is the tusk of a narwhal, an Arctic whale, carved in the middle of the 12th century, and plausibly used as a processional candlestick. The paper will explore the attraction of Medieval objects made of rare and unusual material, with a focus on the narwhal horn in Liverpool.

Session

1621
TitleThe Morality of Money: Lending, Welfare, and Identity through the Market
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairFlocel Sabaté Curull, Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Estudis Medievals Espai, Poder i Cultura, Universitat de Lleida
 
Paper 1621-a Urban Community Building and Public Institutions in Medieval Italy, England, and the Low Countries, 1250-1550
(Language: English)
Arie van Steensel, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 1621-b 'Mutuum Date Nihil Inde Sperantes': Fighting Usurers, Lending Money in Franciscan Observants's Reflections Concerning 'Montes Pietatis'
(Language: English)
Fabrizio Conti, Department of History & Humanities, John Cabot University, Rome
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Medieval cities attracted large numbers of migrants from rural areas and other cities who were looking for a better life, despite the risks involved in urban life from high mortality and socio-economic uncertainty. An important explanation for this attractiveness can be found in the urban institutional arrangements. These included, apart from the town council, various religious and civic organisations (guilds, brotherhoods, neighbourhood associations, etc.) that shaped urban life and are captured in the concept of civil society. The question is how new forms of trust emerged that gave social cohesion to the rapidly growing urban communities. This paper focuses on the public institutions – based on a general form of trust – that strengthened the processes of social integration and community building. It will discuss the social mechanisms that underlay these new solidarities as well as the factors that facilitated their formation. It does so by comparing the developments in cities with different political and socio-economic profiles from Italy and the Low Countries.

Paper -b:
Without a doubt, the struggle against the Jews' monopoly of money lending by replacing their activities with the introduction of the Montes Pietatis can be considered one of the most important themes of 15th-century Franciscan Observant preachers. It was during this period that a new economic and work ethic bearing out the value of time in relation to the needs of production arrived at a crucial phase. On the one hand, the creation of the Montes meant the definite recognition of such a new social and economical code; on the other hand, the 'Franciscan economic thought' that lay behind the institution of the Montes played a much wider role as polemical background against the Jews and as essential requirements of the modern economy.
This paper will consider the implications of both these points as well as the problem of the legitimacy of applying an interest rate to money lending. The debate was high pitched, since as the comparative approach shows, the positions within the different religious orders were not exactly the same.

Session

1506
TitleThe Politics of the Frontier: Contrasting Perspectives from Al-Andalus and Crusader Syria
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairHugh Kennedy, Department of Linguistics, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
 
Paper 1506-a Feudalism and the Military Orders: The Economic and Military Authorities in Crusader Syria, 12th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Benjamin Michaudel, Institut Français du Proche-Orient, Damascus
Paper 1506-b The Development of Feudal Relations in a Frontier Area: The Case of Toledo, 11th-12th Centuries
(Language: English)
María de la Paz Estevez, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) / Universidad de Buenos Aires
 
AbstractPaper -a:
After the first Crusade, Coastal Syria was divided between the Principality of Antioch and the County of Tripoli, and subdivided into several fiefs. This Eastern feudalism led at first to the enrichment of the Crusader lords, and from the second quarter of the 12th century to their weakening, as most of them were unable to sustain the heavy economic costs of the struggles against the Seljuks, like the regular recruitment of soldiers and the maintenance of the castles. The progressive sales and donations of the fiefs of Crusader Syria to the Templars and the Hospitallers appeared then as a sensible policy for the permanence of the Latin states, the military orders having at their disposals substantial funds and contingents of soldiers regularly renewed from the West.

Paper -b:
The Christian conquest of Toledo in 1085 brought to this border area new economic patterns. For the local inhabitants, mostly Mozarab peasants, this meant a rearrangement that involved the loss of properties and political autonomy, and their entrance into new feudal relations.
This paper attempts to analyze the mechanisms through which the northern Christians managed to take part of the wealths of the local population, through which kind of devices they legitimated these actions, and in what ways the church and monarchy attempted to deal with the practical problems of controlling a large population with distinctive characteristics.

Session

1502
TitleThe Realm of Norway and Its Dependencies, I
Date/TimeThursday 14 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
Sponsor'The Realm of Norway and its Dependencies as a Political System', Norwegian Research Council
 
OrganiserEldbjørg Haug, Department of Archaeology, Culture, History & Religion, Universitetet i Bergen
 
Moderator/ChairLars Ivar Hansen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
 
Paper 1502-a Grasping the Periphery?: The Norwegian Seizure of the Icelandic Bishoprics in 1238
(Language: English)
Heidi Anett Øvergård Beistad, Institutt for historie og klassiske fag, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim
Paper 1502-b The Cult of St Olav in the Norse Cultural Sphere
(Language: English)
Øystein Ekroll, Nidaros Cathedral Restoration Workshop, Trondheim
 
AbstractThe session presents the Norwegian Research Council Project 'The Realm of Norway and its Dependencies as a Political System'. The Norwegian king's dominance in his commonwealth was at its peak in the 13th and 14th century and a polity was created to overcome the long distances between centre and periphery. The church province, created 1153, covered the commonwealth except Jemtland, and the veneration of the Norwegian national saint King Olav Haraldsson (St. Olav) became an important common cultural denominator.

Http://www.forskningsradet.no/servlet/Satellite?c=Prosjekt&cid=1253953405966&pagename= ForskningsradetNorsk/Hovedsidemal&p=1181730334233

Session

1319
TitleThe Revival of Medieval Drama and Cultural Transformation
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorMedieval & Renaissance Drama Society
 
OrganiserPamela M. King, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
 
Moderator/ChairAlexandra F. Johnston, English Department, University of Toronto
 
Paper 1319-a Medieval Mystery Plays in 1951: A Year to Remember
(Language: English)
Margaret Rogerson, Department of English, University of Sydney
Paper 1319-b The Mysteries and the Idea of the Working Class
(Language: English)
Pamela M. King, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
 
AbstractThe 20th century saw the revival and reinvention of English religious drama, initially in open defiance of censorship conventions which had kept God off the stage for almost three hundred years. Many of the most ambitious and acclaimed productions have sought to use these plays to mark moments of cultural change across the Anglophone world, celebrating peace in the climate of post-war hardship, and cementing unity and amity in challenged or repressed communities. This session will focus on some individual instances, considering the appeal of medieval guild drama as a platform for expressing celebration and protest.

Session

820
TitleWealth and Ownership in Seljuk and Ottoman Border States
Date/TimeTuesday 12 July 2011: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairChristopher Wright, Hellenic Institute, Royal Holloway, University of London
 
Paper 820-a The Finances of the Transylvanian Towns in the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Zsolt Simon, 'Gheorghe Sincai' Research Institute of Human Sciences, Romanian Academy of Sciences, Târgu Mureş
 
AbstractPaper -a:
On the basis of the preserved medieval accounts of the Transylvanian towns (Sibiu (c. 1400, 1494-1497, 1501, 1503, 1504, 1506-1509), Cluj-Napoca (1496), Brașov (1506-1526), Mediaş (1507-1519), and Sighişoara (1522)), and of the urban archives' charters, in my paper I would like to answer the following research questions: What were the budget structure of these towns? How and why did this structure change in time? How and why did these towns acquire their incomes? How and why did they spend them? How and why did the incomes and the expenses change in time? What were the similarities and the differences between the finances of these towns, and why?

Session

1223
TitleWealth and Power, Wealth or Power: The Rich, the Poor, and Social Status in Late Medieval Towns
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserErik Spindler, Centre for British Studies, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin
 
Moderator/ChairIan Forrest, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
 
Paper 1223-a Spoilt for Choice?: The Correlation between Political Influence and Economical Advantages in a Medieval Town
(Language: English)
Claudia Esch, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte unter Einbeziehung der Landesgeschichte / Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (ZEMAS), Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Paper 1223-b 'Marginality' and 'Poverty': Synonymous, Correlated, or Unrelated?
(Language: English)
Erik Spindler, Centre for British Studies, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin
 
AbstractWealth did not necessarily entail a high social status, nor did poverty inevitably lead to a low status. This session will explore correlations between various scales (rich-poor, powerful-powerless, high status-low status).
Paper A uses the example of 15th-century Bamberg, with its civic and ecclesiastical jurisdictions, to explore how its inhabitants chose between economic advantages and political representation.
Paper B surveys the literature on marginality and, using examples from late medieval London and Bruges, argues against the facile association of relative poverty with a low social status.

Session

1018
TitleWealth and Trade in the Mediterranean and beyond
Date/TimeWednesday 13 July 2011: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairFrancesco Dall'Aglio, Institute for Historical Research, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia
 
Paper 1018-a 'Rich in gold and cloths': Constructing a Brand Image for Medieval Amalfi?
(Language: English)
Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Medieval Amalfi in the 10th and 11th centuries was considered by contemporaries as the home of wealthy merchants and a super-rich marketplace for luxury goods. Like its better-known counterpart in Mediterranean trade, Venice, its merchants are known to have settled throughout the eastern Mediterranean littoral. My paper argues that this Amalfitan 'diaspora' was largely responsible for constructing a glamorous image of medieval Amalfi that exaggerated the reality of their home city, contributing to their own wealth and success abroad, and that the image later became a literary topos which survived long after Amalfi's heyday as a commercial centre came to an end.