Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.

If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 1538Aspects of Medieval Slavery, I: Slave Spaces?
Session 1004Bishops, Popes, and Saints: Christian Churches in the North Western Balkans from Gregory the Great to the 'Bosnian Church', 6th-15th Centuries
Session 1030Carolingian Religious Culture
Session 1527Celebrating Excess?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Court, Consumption, and Authority, I - Patronage and Virtue
Session 829Conduct, Con Jobs, and the Structures of Everyday Life in Middle English
Session 1725Constructions of Medieval Masculinity: Emotions, Eating, and Enforcers
Session 1623Cooking and Eating in The Canterbury Tales, II
Session 203Cross-Cultural Transmission in Nubian Culture, II: The Ceramic Contribution
Session 303Cross-Cultural Transmission in Nubian Culture, III: Art and Architecture
Session 521Cross-Cultural Transmission in Nubian Culture, IV: Identity
Session 1705Dramas and Festivals Linking Religious and Secular History
Session 1522Eating the Unknown: Travel and the Exploration of Exotic Food in the Middle Ages
Session 1201Ecclesiastical Families and Networks in Late Anglo-Saxon England
Session 1028Educating the Laity in Late Medieval England
Session 216Famine or Shortage, II: Italy in the 14th Century
Session 1216Famine, Dearth, and Food Supply in the Mediterranean World: New Approaches from Catalonian Evidence, II
Session 1514Food as Treatment, I: Diet and Health
Session 1217Food in the Monastery, II
Session 322Going to the Dogs?: Holy and Unholy Feasting, Fasting, and Hunting
Session 825High Times: Intoxication in the Mediterranean World
Session 721How Strong Were Medieval Ales?
Session 1329Kingship in Scandinavian Literature
Session 507Medieval Equestrianism, I: Horses in Literature - Theoretical Approaches
Session 607Medieval Equestrianism, II: The Eating Horse - Theoretical and Practical Considerations
Session 324Medieval Recipes and Cookbooks, III: Physical and Spiritual Health
Session 231Medievalisms in 21st-Century Fantasy
Session 706Narrative Construction in 8th- and 9th-Century Latin Hagiography
Session 606New Perspectives on Female Mysticism, II: Case Studies
Session 618'Not by bread alone [...]': Lenten Preaching in the 15th and 16th Centuries, II - Mendicant Preaching in Northern Italy
Session 801Oaths and Swearing in Situations of Conflict
Session 530Perceiving Angels in the Medieval West, I: Angelic Imagery
Session 210Recent Work in Georgian Studies
Session 824Recreating Medieval Food
Session 717Religious Communities and Food, III
Session 1238Slavery in the Medieval Islamic World, III: Slaves within the Household
Session 213Studies in Sustenance, II: Meals and the Monastic Orders
Session 337The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies, III: Care of the Brute Beast - Veterinary Medicine in the Later Middle Ages
Session 1135The Medieval Nile and Red Sea as a Passage of Transmission, II: Pilgrimage
Session 317The Monastic Refectory and Spiritual Food, III
Session 828The Troublesome Twenties: England in Crisis, 1320-1330
Session 529Theoretical Approaches to Middle English Texts
Session 535Trade in the Mediterranean, I: The Early and Central Middle Ages
Session 604Viking Monuments and Legacies
Session 1518Wastelands or Wonderlands?: Interpreting Medieval Landscapes

Session details

Session

1538
TitleAspects of Medieval Slavery, I: Slave Spaces?
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserMarek Jankowiak, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
 
Moderator/ChairThomas J. MacMaster, Department of History, Morehouse College, Georgia / School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
 
Paper 1538-a Slavery in Medieval Hungary: Historiographical Connections
(Language: English)
Cameron Sutt, Department of History & Philosophy, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville
Paper 1538-b From Sclavus to Slavus: Tracing a Semantic Shift
(Language: English)
Marek Jankowiak, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
 
AbstractThis session will examine spacial aspects of slavery through three case studies. The first session looks at slavery in medieval Hungary, with an eye to its broader connections. The second examines medieval mappae mundi and the implications for a spacial origin of slaves while the third looks at the spaces slaves carved out for themselves in late medieval Venice

Session

1004
TitleBishops, Popes, and Saints: Christian Churches in the North Western Balkans from Gregory the Great to the 'Bosnian Church', 6th-15th Centuries
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserDaniel Syrbe, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
Moderator/ChairNadine Ulrike Holzmeier, Historisches Institut, Universität Rostock
 
Paper 1004-a Gregory the Great: Writing Letters to the Bishops of Dalmatia and Illyricum
(Language: English)
Daniel Syrbe, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
Paper 1004-b St Gregory: The Patron Saint of Bosnia
(Language: English)
Emir O. Filipović, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Sarajevo
 
AbstractIn Antiquity and the Middle Ages the North Western Balkans with the Dalmatian coast and its hinterland formed a contact zone of the Latin West and the Greek East of Europe. This situation also had consequences for the development of Christianity in the region, which was influenced by the Western, Roman 'catholic' as well as the Eastern, Constantinopolitanian 'orthodox' church. This session explores the development of Christianity in this area, focussing on the mountainous inland areas, which in Late Antiquity belonged to the various dioceses of the Roman province Dalmatia, later becoming part of different Slavic principalities, and developing into the Bosnian banate from the mid-12th century onwards. Thematically emphasis will be on the development of church structures and hierarchies, saints's cults, and relations of the regional church to the Latin west and the Greek east.

Abstract to paper a: The letters of Gregory the Great as a source corpus are of central importance regarding the relations of the Bishop of Rome to the bishoprics of the former Roman world, which at the end of the 6th century to the beginning of 7th century had undergone far-reaching transformations. Focussing on the area of Dalmatia and Illyricum, this paper explores the very different lines of conflict Gregory was confronted with and traces how different political players in this area responded to Gregory's attempts to centralise ecclesiastical authority on the see of Rome.
Abstract to paper b: The first half of the 13th century, the most tumultuous period in Bosnian relations with papacy, ended with a decision by pope Innocent IV to relocate the see of the Bosnian diocese to the realm of the Hungarian king. It is probable that even the pope himself was not aware that this move would result in an almost 800 year long absence of catholic hierarchy in the Bosnian territory. In this paper we will research one more proximate consequence - the rise of the Bosnian church, schismatic church organisation that filled the gap created after the departure of the Bosnian bishop. The time period we will investigate is the century between the aforementioned relocation and the creation of the Bosnian kingdom.
Abstract to paper c: Numerous written documents and numismatic evidence from the 14th and 15th century testifies that the patron saint of Bosnia in that period was St Gregory. However, these sources also show that during those two centuries at least three different saints of the same name were revered as patrons - St Gregory of Nazianus, St Gregory Thaumaturgus, and St Gregory the Great. The choice of these specific patron saints was obviously motivated by the peculiar religious conditions in Bosnia where the existence of the indigenous but schismatic Bosnian Church increased external pressure on the ruling structures within the Kingdom of Bosnia to finally accept Latin Christianity as the official state religion. This paper will seek to demonstrate how the fluctuating religious policy of the Bosnian rulers in the 15th century reflected on the identity of the patron saint and will attempt to understand these changes within the context of the complex religious situation in Bosnia.

Session

1030
TitleCarolingian Religious Culture
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairRosamond McKitterick, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 1030-a Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale Nouv. Acq. Lat. 1740: The Book of Deuteronomy Interpreted as a Carolingian Christian Community
(Language: English)
Yin Liu, History Department, Zhejiang University
Paper 1030-b 'How many Dúngals are there anyway'?: A Question Revisited
(Language: English)
Julia Warnes, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
 
AbstractPaper -a:
On Manuscript Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale Nouv. Acq. Lat. 1740, the marginal glosses beside the biblical text of Deuteronomy, by a 9th-century anonymous author in Lyons, was the most original commentary on the last book of Pentateuch in the early Middle Ages. Since Paul-Irénée Fransen discovered and edited this commentary, there has not been any systematic study of it yet. The originality of this Lyons commentary, as will be demonstrated by comparing it with patristic exegetical tradition and other Carolingian Deuteronomy commentaries, reflects the distinctive exegetical concern of its author. The Lyons commentary was not written as a purely scholarly work, but as a conscious hermeneutical effort to make Deuteronomy a moral and spiritual guide for different orders in a contemporary Christian community. A reflection upon this commentary will bring fresh thought on the nature of the Carolingian exegesis and religious culture.

Paper-b:
This paper will attempt to establish how many Dúngals were active in the Carolingian empire during the 9th century. Since Traube's (1892) identification of at least four separate Dúngals, the topic has been discussed again and again, most notably by Manitius, Wattenbach, Dümmler, and finally Esposito, who in 1932 concluded that nearly everything could be attributed to one individual. More recently, Bischoff, Contreni, Leonardi, and Riché have taken up the question, arriving at different conclusions. This paper will first reconsider the arguments made by these scholars, and second offer some new insight into this much-vexed question.

Session

1527
TitleCelebrating Excess?: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Court, Consumption, and Authority, I - Patronage and Virtue
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserGeoffrey Humble, School of Medicine, University of Leeds
Sami Kalliosaari, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Moderator/ChairGeoffrey Humble, School of Medicine, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1527-a Wise Objects?: Luxury Production and Royal Patronage Promoting the Ideology of Wisdom in the Court of Alfred the Great
(Language: English)
Sami Kalliosaari, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1527-b Between the 'Moderation' and the 'Excess': 'Eating' and 'Drinking' in Don Juan Manuel de Castilla
(Language: English)
Federico Javier Asiss González, Departamento de Historia, Universidad Nacional de San Juan
Hugo Roberto Basualdo Miranda, Gabinete Historia Universal, Departamento de Historia, Universidad Nacional de San Juan
 
AbstractTaking the feast as a starting point, these panels interrogate medieval writers' assessments of rulership and authority via discussions of court consumption and ostentation. Beginning in the luxury register, this session examines investment in the intangible; the pursuit, proffering and denial of literary and religious authority. Sami Kalliosaari interrogates luxury production in the service of a royal ideology of wisdom in the court of Wessex.

Session

829
TitleConduct, Con Jobs, and the Structures of Everyday Life in Middle English
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAndrew Galloway, Department of English, Cornell University
 
Paper 829-a The Importance of Peter Idley's Social Career to His Text, Instructions to his Son
(Language: English)
Yoshinobu Kudo, Department of English Language & Literature, Kanazawa Gakuin University
Paper 829-b Chaucer and the Art of the Grift
(Language: English)
Kathryn Laity, Department of English, College of Saint Rose, New York
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Abstract withheld

Paper -b:
'Of all the grifters, the confidence man is the aristocrat', David Maurer wrote in his linguistic study The Big Con. Chaucer's Canon's Yeoman's Tale offers a narrative of crime. As in his fabliaux there's a delight in the spinning of the yarn even while he deplores the deception. Nonetheless, I will argue that Chaucer reveals a grifter's appreciation for the aristocratic con because he recognises it shares the same engine as his poetry: the power of a good story.

Session

1725
TitleConstructions of Medieval Masculinity: Emotions, Eating, and Enforcers
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairKatherine J. Lewis, Department of History, English, Linguistics & Music, University of Huddersfield
 
Paper 1725-a 'Dyrne Langað': Homo-Amory and Longing between Men in Beowulf
(Language: English)
Christopher Vaccaro, Department of English, University of Vermont
Paper 1725-b Eating and Fasting in the Construction of Manly Men
(Language: English)
Paul McFadyen, Department of English, University of Dundee
 
AbstractPaper -a:
This paper attempts to better understand the expression of powerful emotion and intimacy surrounding the character Beowulf. A close reading of his departure scenes coupled with an analysis of philology provides insight into the Germanic articulations of love, respect, and bonding. From work done on the Männerbund motif and views on medieval irony, the paper brings in Latin source material, Norse analogues, and recent criticism. The paper includes an analysis of the 'hidden' or 'secret' longing between men and attempts to map that quality across a range of materials.

Paper-b:
With feasting and appetite intrinsic to the construction of a masculine identity in medieval romances, this paper explores both excessive consumption and fasting in relation to the ideals of the male body set out in the literature of the period.

Where a healthy appetite and communal eating are necessary in portraying the importance of homosociality for a knight, how do phenomena such as anorexia mirabilis relate to notions of gender? Furthermore, what does the monstrous appetite of giants, those figures of extreme masculinity, say about the dangers of over-eating? This paper will address these two extremes.

Session

1623
TitleCooking and Eating in The Canterbury Tales, II
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairHuriye Reis, Department of English Language & Literature, Hacettepe University, Turkey
 
Paper 1623-a 'To eten of the smale peres grene': Food in Chaucer's Fabliaux
(Language: English)
Azime Pekşen Yakar, Department of English Translation & Interpretation, Ankara Science University
Paper 1623-b Heavy Eating, Meat Consumption, and the Manliness of Chaucer's Monk
(Language: English)
Burçin Erol, Department of English Language & Literature, Hacettepe University, Ankara
 
AbstractPaper -a:
This paper analyses Chaucer's use of food as sexual metaphors in the carnal universe of the fabliaux in which sex plays an essential part of the fabliau dynamics that include a love triangle in which woman pursues her sexual adventures and betrays her husband. Food is associated with woman's sexual escapades in a positive way denoting woman's sexual power while other representations of food reveal husband's unsuccessful effort to satisfy his young wife sexually. Thus, it implicitly reflects his impotency because of old age. Hence, Chaucer employs representations of food as a powerful agent to lay bare the power struggle between wife and husband with regard to their sexual activities in his fabliaux.

Paper -b:
The eating habits, meat consumption, and the heavy eating of the Monk in the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales have been regarded as an indication of gluttony according to the Christian monastic food culture. However, if these characteristics are interpreted in keeping with the Germanic and Celtic food culture they imply positive values indicating power, superiority over others (physical, economic, and social) and membership of aristocracy. All the food references in the portrait of the Monk are to meat, which is an indicator of power and dominance and comply with the monks 'mastery', 'manliness' and 'ability' as well as his robust physique, implying his upper class origins and power.

Session

203
TitleCross-Cultural Transmission in Nubian Culture, II: The Ceramic Contribution
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserAlexandros Tsakos, Institutt for Arkeologi, Historie, Kultur - og Religionsvitenskap, Universitetet I Bergen
 
Moderator/ChairGiovanni Ruffini, Department of History, Fairfield University
 
Paper 203-a Trade in the Early Period of the Kingdom of Makuria: The Ceramic Evidence
(Language: English)
Aneta Cedro, Instytut Kultur Śródziemnomorskich i Orientalnych, Polskiej Akademii Nauk
Paper 203-b Understanding Alodian Territory: The Ceramic Contribution
(Language: English)
Marie Evina, Département d'Histoire de l'Art et Archéologie, Université de Poitiers
 
AbstractCeramics can portray different kinds of internal cultures, from the poor to the rich in society, and can also portray outside influences on a host culture. This session addresses various aspects of the role of ceramics in the transmission of Nubian culture and in the different Nubian kingdoms. The first paper analyses the role of trade in the early period of Makuria through ceramics. Following is a paper that seeks to understand the culture of the kingdom of Alwa through the ceramic evidence.

Session

303
TitleCross-Cultural Transmission in Nubian Culture, III: Art and Architecture
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserAlexandros Tsakos, Institutt for Arkeologi, Historie, Kultur - og Religionsvitenskap, Universitetet I Bergen
 
Moderator/ChairAdam Simmons, Department of History, Language & Global Cultures, Nottingham Trent University
 
Paper 303-a In Search of Master-Builders of the Nubian Churches: A Sketch Representation of a Plan from Faras Cathedral
(Language: English)
Piotr Makowski, Instytut Archeologii Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Uniwersytet Warszawski
 
AbstractInfluences on Nubian culture can be seen through the abundance of art and architecture found in the Nile Valley. They reflect upon the transmission of ideas and can also reflect upon the geo-political state of Nubia. This session analyses some themes that can be drawn from such material. The first paper examines the nature of Nubian church architecture from the point of view of its builders.

Session

521
TitleCross-Cultural Transmission in Nubian Culture, IV: Identity
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserAlexandros Tsakos, Institutt for Arkeologi, Historie, Kultur - og Religionsvitenskap, Universitetet I Bergen
 
Moderator/ChairVincent van Gerven Oei, Punctum Books, Tirana / Union of Nubian Studies, Voorburg
 
Paper 521-a Putting the Sudanic Back into the Sudan: The Middle Nile as Part of the Sudanic Belt
(Language: English)
Pieter Tesch, Independent Scholar, Croydon
Paper 521-b We Study History to Discover Who We Are: Dongolawi and Kenzi Nubian Perceptions of Their Own Medieval History
(Language: English)
Marcus Jaeger, Institut für Afrikanistik, Universität zu Köln
 
AbstractThe question of identity is important for any culture. The previous sessions have analysed the role of Christianity in Nubian culture but this session looks at the importance of the transmission of non-Christian influences and their role in Nubian identity. The first paper seeks to place Nubian culture as part of a greater Sudanic culture as part of the Sahel. Secondly, another paper will look at how Nubians see themselves, particularly the Dongolawi and Kenzi Nubians, after their long and varied history.

Session

1705
TitleDramas and Festivals Linking Religious and Secular History
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairSiegrid Schmidt, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg
 
Paper 1705-a The Feast of Fools and the Office of the Circumcision from Sens, France
(Language: English)
Océane Boudeau, Centro de Estudos de Sociologia e Estética Musical, Universidade de Lisboa
Paper 1705-b The Repentant Villain’s Farce: François Villon and Medieval Comic Theatre in France
(Language: English)
Daniel Padilha Pacheco da Costa, Instituto de Letras e Linguística, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Written in the beginning of the 13th century, on the Archbishop Pierre de Corbeil's initiative, the office of the Circumcision from Sens contains the liturgical repertory for the 1st January, embellished by poems in Latin. In the cathedral of Sens, as well as in many places in the Middle Ages, the days following Christmas were the occasion of special celebrations where young clerics acted as prelates. The 1st January was not only at the same time the liturgical festival for the Circumcision of Christ, but also the feast of fools led by the Precentor of the fools. This manuscript is thus in the junction of these two celebrations. But does it represent a testimony of the musical repertory sung during the feast of fools, or is it a substitute created by Pierre in the aim of channelling subversive deeds?

Paper -b:
Contemporary literary criticism has increasingly pointed out the inseparable connection between François Villon's work and the secular theatre of the end of the 15th century, particularly the comic forms of drama, such as farces, sotties, moralities, and dramatic monologues. At first glance, this connection might seem a mere consequence of the shift produced by 'la nouvelle critique' in France, which turned one's interest in 'François Villon’s biography' towards the poetic construction of the villain character. But, other than being based on textual evidence, such as the systematic use of theatre’s stylistic features and, above all, on imitations of the villain character by several burlesque genres in that period, this articulation is also based on strong historical evidence, such as a significant amount of anthologies, manuscripts, and old editions of Villon's corpus, along with medieval farces, as well as unanimous testimonies and anecdotes referring to Villon as a 'farcer' [farseur]. Nevertheless, such a connection bears a possible contradiction: how could a last will be played by an actor, if it is a written genre by definition? Assuming that Villon's Testament is indeed a dramatic monologue, we argue that, as soon as the actor puts on the mask of the deceased testator character, he simply transmits the words actually spoken in the first person by the repentant villain's soul that lies beyond.

Session

1522
TitleEating the Unknown: Travel and the Exploration of Exotic Food in the Middle Ages
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
Paper 1522-a Food From Another World: Medieval Travellers and the Gastronomical Culture of the Far East
(Language: English)
Irene Malfatto, Independent Scholar, Philadelphia
Paper 1522-b Ritual Feasting at the Court of Kublai Khan: Marco Polo's Accounts of Food and Drink during His Travels to Yuan China
(Language: English)
Phillip Grimberg, Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In the 13th and 14th century several missionaries travelled from Europe to the Far East, in particular to China. Important Franciscan travellers such as William of Rubruck and John of Marignolli provide important insights into the food culture of the places they visited. Their Latin travel accounts describe in great detail the different kind of food they find and how it should be prepared and consumed. Based on excerpts from these works, this paper will show how European travellers responded to and interacted with foods they often experienced for the first time, like exotic fruits and unusual beverages.

Paper -b:
Although the authenticity of his accounts has been under scrutiny and subject to heated debates among scholars, Marco Polo's (1254-1324) travelogue nevertheless offers a fascinating and rich insight into some of the otherwise obscured details of imperial court life during the reign of Kublai Khan (1271-1294) in China. With regard to food and feasting he records in chapter 10 of his account how court rituals involve ritual drinking of mares's and camels's milk and devouring mutton dishes as a reverence to the nomadic and pastoral origins of the Mongol tribes, what containers and vessels were used for this purpose, how people are seated according to their rank, how the emperor is served his food and how these ritual feastings turn into leisurely gatherings after the ceremonial part is concluded.

Session

1201
TitleEcclesiastical Families and Networks in Late Anglo-Saxon England
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserMary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
 
Moderator/ChairSarah Foot, Faculty of Theology & Religion, University of Oxford
 
Paper 1201-a Keeping it in the Family?: The Extent of Nepotism among the Late Anglo-Saxon Bishops and Ealdormen
(Language: English)
Mary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
Paper 1201-b Saints and Ecclesiastical Property Strategies in 10th- and 11th-Century England and Flanders
(Language: English)
Alison Hudson, Department of History, University of Central Florida
 
AbstractThis session explores the existence of family connections among clergymen and their construction and use of ecclesiastical networks in 10th- and 11th-century England. By addressing such topics as the presence of priestly families among the lower clergy, the extent nepotism can be found in the network of late Anglo-Saxon senior clergy, and the supernatural elements brought to monastic familiae and networks through the strategic use of patron saints, the papers in this session will offer a fuller picture of the practices and influence of families and networks on the late Anglo-Saxon Church. This session aims to foster conversation about the nature of the 10th- and 11th-century English Church and the place of a cleric's family and networks in his personal advancement, that of his kin-group, and his ecclesiastical community.

Session

1028
TitleEducating the Laity in Late Medieval England
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJohanna Scheel, Kunstgeschichtliches Institut, Philipps-Universität Marburg
 
Paper 1028-a ‘Art thou Besynesse?’: The Evolution of Idleness in the 14th and 15th Centuries
(Language: English)
Emma Martin, Department of History, University of York
Paper 1028-b Reginald Pecock's Vernacular Philosophy: Late Medieval Lay 'receyuabilnesse' and Religious Curiosity
(Language: English)
Natalie Calder, School of English, Queen's University Belfast
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Idleness was a multifaceted concept in the later Middle Ages. While the word itself had a variety of meanings such as emptiness, vanity, and uselessness, it also signifies a branch of the deadly sin of sloth. As such, idleness was presented in pastoral writings as part of the seven vices that would ravage the soul of a sinner. In the wake of the Black Death, demographic and socio-economic changes created a crisis of labour. The reactionary legislation linked social change with pervasive sinful behaviour. By the 14th century, idleness had left the pages of pastoralia and preambles of legislation and was appearing personified in the drama Occupation and Idleness. This paper will compare the presentation of the concept of idleness as seen in moral treatise Handlyng Synne to that of the Statute of Labours and Occupation and Idleness. While these texts belong to very different genres their aim is the same: to highlight the dangers of sinful behaviour to the community and attempt to bring them towards a more virtuous and socially acceptable life.

Paper -b
This paper will consider Reginald Pecock's place among the pan-European debate of the 15th century over the place of philosophy in vernacular theology. Comparing Pecock's approach to lay education with that of Jean Gerson and Nicholas Cusa, the paper will focus on Pecock's perception of the intellectual capacity of his audiences to understand more complex issues of faith than that to which they are exposed through pastoralia. In attempting to equip the laity with intellective tools usually reserved for the 'lered', Pecock recognises a religious curiosity among his audiences that cannot be satisfied by out-dated, simplified education.

Session

216
TitleFamine or Shortage, II: Italy in the 14th Century
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorMedieval Association of Rural Studies
 
OrganiserAdam Franklin-Lyons, Marlboro Institute for Liberal Arts & Interdisciplinary Studies, Emerson College, Boston
 
Moderator/ChairPhilip Slavin, School of History, University of Kent
 
Paper 216-a Fretura, Carestia, or, Fam: Understandings of Food Shortage Intensity amongst 14th-Century Urban Elites
(Language: English)
Adam Franklin-Lyons, Marlboro Institute for Liberal Arts & Interdisciplinary Studies, Emerson College, Boston
Paper 216-b The Florentine Grain Carestia of 1329-1330: Famine or Dearth? - The Anatomy of a Market Break
(Language: English)
Marie D'Aguanno Ito, Department of History & Art History, George Mason University, Virginia
 
AbstractThis is the second panel investigating the line between major and minor food crises (see Famine or Shortage, I: Words and Definitions). These two essays provide a focused set of comparisons by looking at famines and shortages in Tuscany and Catalonia in the 14th century. The first essay argues that whatever city leaders understood of famine severity, their response was virtually identical in each scenario. The second paper returns to the question of vocabulary and discusses how we as scholars can identify a 'market break', whether or not a famine or a dearth has occurred.

Session

1216
TitleFamine, Dearth, and Food Supply in the Mediterranean World: New Approaches from Catalonian Evidence, II
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorProject 'Mercados alimenticios en la Edad Media: actores, mecanismos y dinámicas' (HAR2012-31802, MINECO, Gobierno de España), Universitat de Lleida / Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
 
OrganiserPere Benito i Monclús, Departament d'Història, Universitat de Lleida
Rosa Lluch Bramon, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
Antoni Riera i Melis, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
 
Moderator/ChairAntoni Riera i Melis, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
 
Paper 1216-a Medieval Food Markets: Origin, Structure, and Food Products of the Rural Markets in the County of Barcelona, 9th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Maria Soler-Sala, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
Paper 1216-b Famine, Dearth, and Credit in North-Eastern Catalonia before the Black Death
(Language: English)
Joel Colomer Casamitjana, Departament d'Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona
 
AbstractThe study of food supply systems is enjoying some popularity in connection to the thriving study of the history of markets, which has increased awareness about the importance of distribution networks in preindustrial times. On the basis of mostly unexplored documentation available in Catalonia, the papers grouped in this session study different aspects of medieval food supply systems in this region: from its origin and structuration in the early Middle Ages, to its functioning and eventual failures in both urban and rural contexts.

Session

1514
TitleFood as Treatment, I: Diet and Health
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserWendy J. Turner, Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy, Augusta University, Georgia
 
Moderator/ChairIona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1514-a Food for Thought: Diet and Mental Health
(Language: English)
Wendy J. Turner, Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy, Augusta University, Georgia
Paper 1514-b Dietary Advice for the Pregnant and Nursing Mother
(Language: English)
Belle Tuten, Department of History, Juniata College, Pennsylvania
 
AbstractThis series of panels engages food as both treatment for illness and the reverse, the medieval misunderstanding of food as treatment. Further, some of the papers look at how dietary deficiencies led to medical misunderstanding of health conditions, at how art and literature treat food as symbolic of good health and virtuous living. All together, the three panels on 'Diet and Health', 'Curatives for Ails', and 'Beliefs, Deficiencies, and Appetites' provide an overview of the connections between food and health in the Middle Ages. This first panel investigates food as a medical treatment for health conditions, especially long-term illness, and as a preventative for illness. The interest here is in prescription food or links between diet and health. The papers have particular interest in patients with mental health issues, who are pregnant or nursing, and who are suffering from 'leprosy'.

Session

1217
TitleFood in the Monastery, II
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairChristian Krötzl, Department of History & Philosophy, University of Tampere
 
Paper 1217-a History and Provisions for the Convent in Central Italian Cartulary Chronicles
(Language: English)
Lari Ahokas, Department of Philosophy, History & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Paper 1217-b Zawiyah Cuisines in the Anatolian Seljukian's Era
(Language: Deutsch)
Zehra Odabaşı, Department of History, Selçuk Üniversitesi
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Provisions for the table of the convent have been a long-standing concern in monastic administration. As 'histories from administrative documents', cartulary chronicles often share this concern. In this paper, I will examine the particular historiographical agendas relating to this issue in some Central Italian cartulary chronicles written in 11th and 12th centuries.

Paper -b:
Historical and sociological investigation of foundations is very important to be able to correctly and accurately reveal the social history of Islamic societies. The zawiyahs that had been founded in the Anatolian Seljukian's era constituted an important factor for settlement at the beginning period of 13th century and played a significant role in Islamic spread. The zawiyahs that had been established as wealthy foundations by Seljukian Sultans like İzzeddin Keykavus I (1211-1220) and Alaaddin Keykubad I (1220-1237), viziers, statesmen, and wealthy people played a significant role at the same period as guesthouses along trade routes and itineraries. The deed of trusts of Anatolian Seljukian pious foundations and the Ottoman period archival resources will be investigated in this study and the zawiyah cuisines and the eating and drinking habits of them will be studied and the economic situation of zawiyahs in Anatolian Seljukian period and the Ottoman period of the 16th century will be compared.

Session

322
TitleGoing to the Dogs?: Holy and Unholy Feasting, Fasting, and Hunting
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairCatherine J. Batt, School of English, University of Leeds
 
Paper 322-a ‘Do not give that which is holy to dogs’: Hunting, the curée Ritual, and the Eucharist
(Language: English)
Andrew John Pattison, Department of English Philology, University of Oulu
Paper 322-b Neither Flesh nor Bread: Unholy Feasting in the Roman de Renart
(Language: English)
Pamela Diaz, Department of French, Hamilton College, New York
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Medieval hunting rituals are generally seen as indicators of the social complexion of medieval society. This paper will examine the prominent hunting ritual known as the curée in which the hounds are feasted upon freshly killed venison. The ritual is examined as a projection of noble dominance over society in which ritual impact is effected through a co-opting of imagery from the Eucharist. The development of the curée and the Catholic Eucharist is historicised diachronically and in tandem. Sharing ritual forms, the curée and the Eucharist are interpreted as mutually constitutive, as 'feeding' off of one another.

Paper -b:
This paper will examine the Renart and Primaut episode in the Roman de Renart: the fox convinces the wolf to sneak into the church, where they have a nocturnal feast on the provisions in the tabernacle. An analysis of the vocabulary referring to the things they feast upon will reveal how anxieties about the instability of language, typical of the Renardian tradition, seep into this narrative. Amongst the earliest branches (c. 1178), this branch draws on the earlier Latin 'Ysengrimus' and introduces, I will argue, allusions to the issues raised by the Eucharistic Controversy of the 11th century, thereby exploring institutional discourse within the structure of Renardian allegory.

Session

825
TitleHigh Times: Intoxication in the Mediterranean World
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairHarry Munt, Department of History, University of York
 
Paper 825-a Monasteries, Wine Production, and Consumption in Umayyad Egypt
(Language: English)
Myriam Wissa, University of London
Paper 825-b Food Consumption and Hashish Intoxication in Medieval Europe and Islam: A Comparative Literary Approach
(Language: English)
Danilo Marino, Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (INALCO), Paris
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The question of wine production in medieval Egypt has been documented and there are a number of historical records which suggest that wine production, which derives from a long standing practice, was still prevalent. The monasteries drew revenue to meet their needs from their agricultural products, namely dates, olives, and wine. Similarly, the monasteries in Iraq and Syria often became notable for their vintages, and the inns and taverns attached to them were popular for Christian and Muslim laypeople alike. In Umayyad Egypt, Coptic and Greek ostraca from seventh and eighth century monastic sites such as Thebes and Wadi Sarga and from other non-monastic settlements, namely Edfu provide evidence of wine production and consumption and may indicate its significance to the Umayyad rulers.This article draws on this and other literary records to explore whether Islamisation had achieved a subtle accomodation prohibiting wine selling and consumption. It also shows how early Islamic law could be flexible in responding to social changes.

Paper -b:
In this communication we will discuss the interesting correlation between food and hashish consumption as it is portrayed in Taqī al-Dīn Abū l-Tuqā al-Badrī's (d. 894/1488) anthology, the Rāḥat al-arwāḥ fī l-ḥašīš wa-l-rāḥ (The delight of the souls through hashish and wine), which collect narratives as well as verses inspired by hashish and wine, and in the last books of François Rabelais' (d. 1553) Tiers Livre. As far as hashish intoxication provokes the craving for food, in both the literary works we can observe joyful, humoristic, though ridiculous sketches of desperate intoxicated food-seekers and descriptions of real or imaginary plentiful banquets.

Session

721
TitleHow Strong Were Medieval Ales?
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorMedieval Brewers Guild
 
OrganiserStephen C. Law, Department of Humanities & Philosophy, University of Central Oklahoma
 
Moderator/ChairNuri Creager, Department of Foreign Languages & Literatures, Oklahoma State University
 
Paper 721-a The Demon Drink: Anglo-Saxon Attitudes to Alcoholic Consumption
(Language: English)
Stephen Pollington, Independent Scholar, Basildon
Paper 721-b Twy Brownum Ealu: Revisiting the Anglo-Saxon Secrets of Twice-Brewed Ale
(Language: English)
Stephen C. Law, Department of Humanities & Philosophy, University of Central Oklahoma
 
AbstractThe relative alcoholic strength of beers and ales in the Middle Ages can be evaluated using several tools of assessment. This session examines the 'rhetorical' evidence used by clerical sources who wish to impose greater temperance on Anglo-Saxon society, the rise of grain prices that restrained drunkenness in the Netherlands, not governmental regulation, and the 'brewing science' that validates the possibility of super strength Anglo-Saxon ales.

Session

1329
TitleKingship in Scandinavian Literature
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAlaric Hall, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of English, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1329-a A Promising Young Man: Narrating Youth in Old Norse Royal Biography
(Language: English)
Sabine Heidi Walther, Institut für Germanistik, Vergleichende Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft, Skandinavistik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Paper 1329-b King Sigurd on a Crusade to Eastern Småland as Presented in 12th- and 13th-Century Scandinavian Literature
(Language: English)
Ralf Palmgren, Department of Philosophy, History & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The youth of a great man is often a blank space for the biographer. For the battles and wars of a king, there might be plenty of eyewitness accounts, but of course nobody takes notes of significant events and deeds of every child of a ruler, even less of a commoner because of course, a great man is only a great man ex post. But at the same time narratives of birth, childhood, and youth are useful both for the ruler (or the member of the dynasty who had the biography commissioned) as a legitimizing element and for the author as narrative opportunity to tell vivid anecdotes. This paper explores the role of classical literature as a source of inspiration for authors of Old Norse royal biographies with a focus on birth, childhood, and youth of kings.

Paper -b:
The Christian King Sigurd I 'the Crusader' Magnusson of Norway ruled from 1103 to 1130. He participated in a Crusade to the Near East from 1107 to 1110. He is also associated with a lesser known crusade to eastern Småland in Sweden in the early 1120s. In this paper I will contextualize King Sigurd's hypothetical swords mission in the light of Scandinavian literature from the 12th and 13th centuries.

Session

507
TitleMedieval Equestrianism, I: Horses in Literature - Theoretical Approaches
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserTimothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Tilbury
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
 
Moderator/ChairTimothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Tilbury
 
Paper 507-a Tails, Eyes, and Oats: Rules for Keeping Horses in Welsh Law Texts
(Language: English)
Edgar Rops, Independent Scholar, Riga
Paper 507-b King Edward of Portugal's Treatise on Horse Riding: A Repertory of Technical and Psychological Considerations
(Language: English)
Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade de Lisboa
 
AbstractThis is one of three complementary sessions on medieval equestrianism, organised by Timothy Dawson and Anastasija Ropa. The session looks into the representation of horses in different genres of medieval literature, from legal texts to romances, and fabliaux to equestrian treatises. Metaphorical and practical aspects of the representation of horses in literature will be analyzed, and, in particular, several of the papers will consider the association between horses and food, responding to the overall theme of the Congress in 2016.

Session

607
TitleMedieval Equestrianism, II: The Eating Horse - Theoretical and Practical Considerations
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserTimothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Tilbury
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
 
Moderator/ChairEdgar Rops, Independent Scholar, Riga
 
Paper 607-a Feasting and Fasting with Horses in the Late Medieval French Romance Cycle Lancelot-Graal
(Language: English)
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
Paper 607-b Bread for My Horses
(Language: English)
Katrin Boniface, Department of History, University of California, Riverside
 
AbstractThe session is one of three on medieval equestrianism co-organised by Timothy Dawson and Anastasija Ropa. The session combines literary and archaeological thematics of the other two sessions, with particular focus on the IMC 2016 thematic strand, food. The goal of the session is to examine evidence of horse nutrition and its role in establishing the relation between people and horses, medieval ideas about feeding horses and humans, and archaeological evidence for horse breeds and their feeding patterns in the Middle Ages.

Session

324
TitleMedieval Recipes and Cookbooks, III: Physical and Spiritual Health
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMary Hayes, Department of English, University of Mississippi
 
Paper 324-b Evolution and Application of Humoral Theory in the Medieval Kitchen
(Language: English)
Loren David Mendelsohn, Science & Engineering Library, City College of New York
 
AbstractPaper -a:
A discussion and comparison of several sources used by medieval medical practitioners to prescribe dietary regimens based on humoral theory. Dioscorides's Materia Medica, Galen's Properties of Foodstuffs, Avicenna's Canon of Medicine, and the Tacuinum Sanitatis are the primary focus, but other sources are also examined. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of humoral theory and its application, including ingredient-by-ingredient analyses of specific dishes with stated humoral values.

Session

231
TitleMedievalisms in 21st-Century Fantasy
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorTales After Tolkien Society
 
OrganiserHelen Young, Faculty of Arts & Education, Deakin University, Melbourne
 
Moderator/ChairLesley Coote, Department of English & Creative Writing, University of Hull
 
Paper 231-a Aching for Tiffany: Terry Pratchett's (Re)Visionary Witches
(Language: English)
Molly Brown, Department of English, University of Pretoria
Paper 231-b Medievalisms in Urban Fantasy Television: Buffy to Lost Girl
(Language: English)
Helen Young, Faculty of Arts & Education, Deakin University, Melbourne
 
AbstractWhat does 'medieval' mean in contemporary popular culture? J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth, shaped as it was by his medieval scholarship, is a starting point but not the end of contemporary mass-market medievalisms. No work has done more to paint the broad brushstrokes than The Lord of the Rings, the foundational text of the modern popular fantasy genre. This session of papers, sponsored by the Tales After Tolkien Society (www.talesaftertolkien.org), explores the diversity of medievalisms in the multi-media genre which is fantasy. From Young Adult Literature to video games and urban fantasy television, the papers ask: what ideologies are filtered through the idea of the medieval past? How does the present inflect representations of the past? To what ends does the past enter the popular culture of the present? The session builds on work in two recently published collections from Cambria Press, which are also sponsored by the Society: Fantasy and Science Fiction Medievalisms and The Middle Ages in Popular Culture.

Session

706
TitleNarrative Construction in 8th- and 9th-Century Latin Hagiography
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAnne-Marie Helvétius, Département d'Histoire, Université Paris VIII
 
Paper 706-a Structure and Narrative Sequence in Adomnán's Vita Sancti Columbae
(Language: English)
Duncan Sneddon, Scottish History, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 706-b The Potent and the Potable: Food and Drink in Carolingian Miracle Narratives
(Language: English)
Maximilian McComb, Department of History, Cornell University
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Adomnán's Vita Sancti Columbae, written c. 700, is one of the early group of Irish hagiographies. It consists of short narratives divided by type into three books, and within those books stories are often linked by their theme or certain common motifs - some of which Adomnán comments on explicitly. This paper will examine the structure and narrative sequencing of this text, including a consideration of inconsistencies in Adomnán's approach and how he attempts to present his work as a unified whole.

Paper -b:
In this paper, I discuss the role of food and drink in miraculous healing and punishment. Carolingian hagiographers present a number of cases in which food related illnesses required saintly intervention. Food and drink could also be the direct or indirect object of punishment miracles. These miracles both healed disordered eating and used food and drink as a way of correcting improper human belief or behavior. I argue that through references to food and drink, 9th-century hagiographers expressed broader ideas about physical and spiritual correction inherent in their presentations of saints's posthumous miracles.

Session

606
TitleNew Perspectives on Female Mysticism, II: Case Studies
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAnne-Laure Méril-Bellini delle Stelle, Independent Scholar, Pissos
 
Paper 606-a Food for the Faithful: Christ and Food in the Visions of Agnes Blannbekin
(Language: English)
Amanda Langley, School of History, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper 606-b Maria of Oignies: Her Fasting and Its Theological Meaning in Comparative Examination
(Language: English)
Monika Gerundt, Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In her visions, Agnes Blannbekin, a Viennese beguine of the late 13th century, describes Christ as playing many, multifaceted roles. Christ's connection with food in her work is no exception. Christ feeds humanity spiritually, prepares food in his kitchen, sits with the faithful at banquet in the Fatherland, becomes the Eucharist, and chastises those that fail to dine in the appropriate manner on Earth. Through examining Agnes's discussion of Christ's interaction with food, I will place Agnes's use of food amongst that of her contemporaries in order to highlight Agnes's departure from the norm in the construction of her visions.

Paper -b:
Jacques de Vitry describes in his Vita Mariae Oigniacensis Maria's habits regarding her diet, her fasting, and her intake of the Eucharist. What she eats and on which days she is fasting has a theological meaning and is closely connected with her piety. This description in her Vita and also that of the fasting of Elisabeth of Thüringen shed light on female piety and mysticism in the 13th century. This paper compares their habits with the theology and personal fasting of Bernhard of Clairvaux, but also with the regulations of Benedictine consuetudines and the overall view regarding fasting during the Middle Ages.

Paper -c:
Groundbreaking studies have highlighted the symbolic significance of food and drink as an underlying theme in women's spirituality. Yet the phenomenon of ebrietas sancta as noted by the annotator in the margin of the manuscript London, British Library Add MS 61823, f. 48r of the Book of Margery Kempe has been little explored in scholarship. This paper discusses the multi-layered meaning of the concrete and sometimes baffling images of 'Minnetrunkenheit' by comparing the Book of Margery Kempe with the enigmatic remarks about wine and drunkenness in the under-researched Offenbarungen of the 15th century Dominican lay sister Katharina Tucher. The interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approach of analysing the theme of spiritual inebriation in female mysticism offers a new perspective on a continental tradition of 'Frauenmystik' from which both texts emerge.

Session

618
Title'Not by bread alone [...]': Lenten Preaching in the 15th and 16th Centuries, II - Mendicant Preaching in Northern Italy
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorInternational Medieval Sermon Studies Society (IMSSS)
 
OrganiserLorenza Tromboni, Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo, Università di Firenze
 
Moderator/ChairEleonora Lombardo, Instituto de Filosofia, Universidade do Porto
 
Paper 618-a The Christian 'Other' in Bernardino Caimi's Lenten Preaching
(Language: English)
Valentina Covaci, Institute for Advanced Study, New Europe College, Bucharest
Paper 618-b Moralising the Faithful during Lent: Contrasting Views Concerning Witches in Franciscan and Dominican Sermons at the End of the 15th Century
(Language: English)
Fabrizio Conti, Department of History & Humanities, John Cabot University, Roma
 
Abstract'One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from God's mouth'. This sentence was the foundation of Lent, a period in which the renunciation of food was accompanied by a richer nourishment of the divine word, mainly provided through preaching. This spiritual food was particularly abundant in Late Middle Ages, when Lenten preaching became a daily practice and numerous Lenten sermon collections were written. This second session focuses on Lenten preaching in northern-Italian cities and courts, where mendicant preachers played a prominent role in moralising the society and in shaping the religious identity of their listeners.

Session

801
TitleOaths and Swearing in Situations of Conflict
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserSilke Schwandt, Fakultät für Geschichtswissenschaft, Philosophie und Theologie, Universität Bielefeld
 
Moderator/ChairJoshua Hey, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
 
Paper 801-a Swearing Burghers: Unification in Medieval Towns by Oath
(Language: English)
Gerhild Landwehr, Fakultät für Geschichtswissenschaft, Philosophie und Theologie, Universität Bielefeld
Paper 801-b Believing in Law and Justice: Legal Oaths as a Guarantee for Social Stability in Medieval England
(Language: English)
Silke Schwandt, Fakultät für Geschichtswissenschaft, Philosophie und Theologie, Universität Bielefeld
 
AbstractOaths play a vital role in the social life of medieval times. As social practices they can be found in many areas of society. Our focus lies on the way oaths and swearing were used to build consensus and to secure social peace. We will take our examples for one thing from the fields of medieval English law, where oaths secure the social order through manifesting belief and trust. A second focus lies on swearing rituals and political oaths that take place to prevent and end quarrels and riots within urban societies, where they secure social peace and unity.

Session

530
TitlePerceiving Angels in the Medieval West, I: Angelic Imagery
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorSchool of History, University of East Anglia
 
OrganiserSophie Sawicka-Sykes, Independent Scholar, Cambridge
 
Moderator/ChairSophie Sawicka-Sykes, Independent Scholar, Cambridge
 
Paper 530-a A Pseudo-Dionysian Reading of Wolfram's Parzival
(Language: English)
Gudrun Warren, Norwich Cathedral Library
Paper 530-b The Bread of Angels, Sweet Wine, and Bitter Dregs: Representing Angels with the Chalice and Host in East Anglian Parish Church Timber Roofs, c. 1400-1540
(Language: English)
Sarah Cassell, Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia
 
AbstractAngels performed a variety of roles in medieval society, but how were their diverse forms and functions represented? Our panel seeks to answer this question by exploring a range of textual and architectural sources dating between the late 8th and mid-16th centuries from England, Ireland, and the Continent. The three papers offer new perspectives on how imagery of angelic order was transformed in monastic, secular, and parish contexts. The panelists also discuss the parts played by angelic intercessors, guides, and Mass assistants in spiritual journeys and communions.

Session

210
TitleRecent Work in Georgian Studies
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorShota Rustaveli Institute of Georgian Literature, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University
 
OrganiserBert Beynen, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Temple University, Philadelphia
 
Moderator/ChairIrma Ratiani, Shota Rustaveli Institute of Georgian Literature, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University
 
Paper 210-a Water as a Marker of New Kingship
(Language: English)
Grigol Jokhadze, Department of History, Ilia State University, Tbilisi
Paper 210-b Legitimate Succession in Rustaveli's The Man in the Panther Skin and Queen Tamar's Reign
(Language: English)
Bert Beynen, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Temple University, Philadelphia
 
AbstractJokhadze analyzes the role water plays in accounts of the founding of Tbilisi and argues that the accounts used the image of water to portray King Vakhtang I Gorgasali as a truly Christian king. Beynen discusses the abdications in Shota Rustaveli's The Man in the Panther Skin in connection with with Giorgi Mchedlishvili's 2000 book about Queen Tamar's coronation. Tsipuria discusses the representation of the Georgian Middle Ages in contemporary Georgian literature, especially in relation to Russian colonization, and analyzes Georgia's integration into the global post-modern world.

Session

824
TitleRecreating Medieval Food
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairChristopher Dyer, Centre for English Local History, University of Leicester
 
Paper 824-a Wastel, Cocket, and Treyt: Some Experimental Investigations into the Manufacturing Methodology of Certain Medieval Breads
(Language: English)
Richard Fitch, Historic Royal Palaces, East Molesey
Paper 824-b Cheesemaking in the Early Medieval British Isles
(Language: English)
Leslie Lockett, Department of English, Ohio State University
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The Assize of Bread has proved to be a rich source of information for the study of this most staple of foodstuffs. The Assize has been written about at great length by many authors, but most works concentrate on the socio-economic impact of the legislation rather than the bread itself. Do we actually know how a medieval loaf of bread was made? I suggest that it is by investigating and experimenting with the method of manufacturing of bread rather than concentrating on the Assize details which will lead us to a much closer understanding of the bread our forebears consumed.

Paper -b:
Artisanal food producers underscore their recovery of 'traditional' foodways, but in the case of cheese, even the smallest and slowest commercial producers are not replicating premodern cheesemaking methods, which lacked thermometers, refrigeration, and bleach, among other conveniences. My paper explores the (sometimes startling) material realities of cheesemaking in the early medieval British Isles, from husbandry practices that secured lactating animals' milk for human consumption, to technologies for creating curdling agents from plant proteases or animal maws, to the aging of cheeses used for food rents and Lenten fare during the winter. Special consideration will be given to toponymic and archaeological evidence for an interdependent relationship among salt production, sheep farming, and cheesemaking in coastal England, comparable to the present-day partnership between Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and Parma ham.

Session

717
TitleReligious Communities and Food, III
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorDepartment for the Study of Religions, Masaryk University, Brno
 
OrganiserDavid Zbíral, Centrum pro digitální výzkum náboženství, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
 
Moderator/ChairSita Steckel, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
 
Paper 717-a Eating with the Other: Christian Missionaries among the Mongols in the 13th and 14th Centuries
(Language: English)
Jana Valtrová, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Paper 717-b Dinner with the Inquisition: Feeding Inquisitors and Their Prisoners in Medieval Italy
(Language: English)
Jill Moore, Independent Scholar, London
 
AbstractSince Caroline Walker Bynum's Holy Feast and Holy Fast, food as a cultural symbol and identity marker has become almost a commonplace in historical scholarship. Nevertheless, there is still considerable space left for research into what was (and was not) eaten in different religious communities of medieval Europe, as well as for fresh interpretations of their meal practices and dietary restrictions, and of the symbolic meanings they assigned to food. Ancient Christian ascetic practices and symbols were being transmitted and reinterpreted throughout the Middle Ages; new kinds of self-disciplining and even self-harming behaviour emerged within the Christian ascetic tradition; the avoidance of certain types of food served to draw boundaries between an in-group and its out-groups; dining habits of peoples and religious communities from outside Europe were being described in missionary and/or travel accounts; attitudes towards food were used to denounce some communities as heretical; and rumours of illicit orgiastic feasts haunted the imagination of churchmen. This panel sets out to examine this exciting field, focusing on what was eaten in specific religious communities, what reasons members of these communities gave for their dining and fasting practices, and how food, dining habits, dietary restrictions, fasting, and feasting served as tools of reflection about the identity of a group.

Session

1238
TitleSlavery in the Medieval Islamic World, III: Slaves within the Household
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserThomas J. MacMaster, Department of History, Morehouse College, Georgia / School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Magdalena Moorthy Kloss, Institut für Sozialanthropologie, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Moderator/ChairLisa Nielson, Department of Music, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio
 
Paper 1238-a Domestic Slavery as a One-Generational Phenomenon: Importation and Manumission in Medieval Damascus
(Language: English)
Jan Hagedorn, School of History, University of St Andrews
Paper 1238-b Foreigners Twice Over: Slaves in the Itinerant Household of Ibn Battuta
(Language: English)
Marina Tolmacheva, Department of History, Washington State University
 
AbstractThis session continues the discussion of slaves within the household in the medieval Islamicate world. The first paper examines the types of roles that slaves might take within households in the Islamic west; the second closely reads the sources and argues that domestic slavery in 13th and 14th-century Damascus was one-generational; the third examines the slaves within a single itinerant household, that of the traveller Ibn Battuta.

Session

213
TitleStudies in Sustenance, II: Meals and the Monastic Orders
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorGraduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
 
OrganiserRuth J. Salter, Department of History, University of Reading
 
Moderator/ChairAnne Lawrence-Mathers, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
 
Paper 213-a Aspects of Monastic Alms and Almsgiving in the High Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Paper 213-b Asking Nicely: Etiquette Lessons on whether Christ Asked or Begged for Food, from a 14th-Century Irish Archbishop and His Franciscan Interlocutor
(Language: English)
Bridget Riley, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
 
AbstractWithin these sessions, speakers will be considering the theme of food and sustenance as it applies to their own areas of research. These case studies will highlight the ways in which sustenance (be that food for the body or food for the soul) can be found in a wide range of sources and have an impact across a number of disciplines. In this second session the focus will be on food in both the practical and spiritual spheres of religious communities and religious persons.

Session

337
TitleThe Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies, III: Care of the Brute Beast - Veterinary Medicine in the Later Middle Ages
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserSunny Harrison, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Open University
 
Moderator/ChairKathleen Walker-Meikle, Department of History, University College London
 
Paper 337-a Lords, Ladies, Grooms, and 'Boys': The Many Faces of Animal Care in Late Medieval Miracle Narratives
(Language: English)
Sunny Harrison, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Open University
Paper 337-b Contracts for the Cure of Animals in the Kingdom of Valencia in the 15th Century: The Case of Alzira
(Language: English)
Carmel Ferragud, Institut d'Història de la Medicina i de la Ciència López Piñero, Universitat de València
 
AbstractScholars have long recognised the great variety of veterinary writers and practitioners operating in the middle ages and yet we have made surprisingly little progress in illuminating the experiences, expectations, and practices of that highly heterogeneous group of people who devoted some or all of their lives to maintaining the health of animals. The work of writers such as Laurentius Rusius and Manuel Díez had a significant and lasting impact on veterinary medicine. Animal healers are also witnessed in miracle narratives, juridical documents, and household accounts, operating at every level of society. This session will use a variety of sources from across western Europe and Iberia to explore the lives of animal healers, their interactions with society and their attitudes towards their animal charges.

Session

1135
TitleThe Medieval Nile and Red Sea as a Passage of Transmission, II: Pilgrimage
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserAdam Simmons, Department of History, Language & Global Cultures, Nottingham Trent University
 
Moderator/ChairJoost Hagen, Ägyptologisches Institut, Universität Leipzig
 
Paper 1135-a Pilgrimage Relationships in Christianity and Islam
(Language: English)
Jacke Phillips, Department of Art & Archaeology, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Paper 1135-b Buying Relics from Paradise: Western Christians at the Nile
(Language: English)
Jessica Tearney-Pearce, Woolf Institute / Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
 
AbstractPilgrimage was an important aspect of Medieval life. This session seeks to address the role of pilgrimage in the regions of the Nile Valley and the Red Sea. Who travelled and where? Both Muslim and Christian pilgrims travelled extensively to visit shrines, often appearing in seemingly unlikely places, including European Christians visiting sites far down the Nile. These papers also enlighten the role of pilgrimage outside of the Holy Land. With expensive toll charges to travel within enemy lands, if travel was even permitted at all, medieval pilgrimage developed into a vast and varied transmission of peoples and ideas.

Session

317
TitleThe Monastic Refectory and Spiritual Food, III
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorCentre d’Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Cahiers de Civilisation Médiévale
 
OrganiserPascale Brudy, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)
 
Moderator/ChairEstelle Ingrand-Varenne, Centre de recherche française à Jérusalem, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) / Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM - UMR 7302), Université de Poitiers
 
Paper 317-a Spiritual Reading, Theological Conversation, and Alms for the Poor in Royal Banquets, 12th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Martin Aurell, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM - UMR 7302), Université de Poitiers
Paper 317-b 'Diabolus est in refectorio': Fighting the Devil during Monastic Meals, c. 1100 - c. 1300
(Language: English)
François Wallerich, Centre d'Histoire Sociale et Culturelle de l'Occident (CHISCO), Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense
 
AbstractAt the heart of communal life, the refectory was an area where monks gathered, nourished their bodies but also strengthened their soul. How did bells, silence, readings, prayers, refectory decorations such as paintings, sculpture and inscriptions, and ritual work together to sanctify the monastic meal? What were the links between the communal dining room and the church, the place of the Eucharistic celebration and the prefiguration of the Celestial banquet? How did each monastery build, decorate and conceive of its refectory in this aim? Did the relationship between communal repasts and spiritual nourishment in monastic life have echoes in the community of canons, lay society or in chivalry?

Session

828
TitleThe Troublesome Twenties: England in Crisis, 1320-1330
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorThe National Archives, Kew / University of Cambridge
 
OrganiserPaul R. Dryburgh, The National Archives, Kew
 
Moderator/ChairW. Mark Ormrod, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
 
RespondentW. Mark Ormrod, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
 
Paper 828-a England in Crisis?: The 1320s - An Overview
(Language: English)
Paul R. Dryburgh, The National Archives, Kew
Paper 828-b The Chamber Accounts of Edward II
(Language: English)
Kathryn Warner, Independent Scholar, Düsseldorf
 
AbstractRarely in English medieval history can a ten-year span have seen as many seismic shifts as the decade from 1320. A prolonged and often bloody struggle over the rights and prerogatives of the crown and the person of the king, fought against a backdrop of economic dislocation and international conflict, culminated in the forced abdication (and probable murder) of King Edward II, engineered by his own queen. This was followed by a three-year regency again marked by oppressive government and civil strife, which was only ended by the last in a decade-long series of ritualistic executions. The decade has long been viewed by historians as a blot on the reputation of crown and people. This session will explore the personal kingship of Edward II and Edward III and the strategies employed by crown and community to dictate the political and legal agenda. It will also, however, assess the extent to which this decade was innovative and formative in terms of fiscal, legal, and administrative reform, and in forging new approaches to kingship and queenly power.

Session

529
TitleTheoretical Approaches to Middle English Texts
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairCatherine J. Batt, School of English, University of Leeds
 
Paper 529-a Down to Earth, Down to Turd: Deconstructing the Book of Nature in The Owl and the Nightingale
(Language: English)
Michael J. Warren, Independent Scholar, Cranbrook
Paper 529-b 'Not al on slepe, ne fully waking': Wakeful and Hypnagogic Narrators of Vision Poetry
(Language: English)
Imogen Forbes-Macphail, Medieval & Renaissance Literature, University of Cambridge
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The anonymous Owl and the Nightingale has received many responses from critics struck by the poem's strange blend of ornithological accuracy and avian symbolism. This paper aims to cohere these sorts of discrepancies by suggesting, through an ecocritical approach, that the author of this text is largely concerned with sending up the literary fashion for treating birds and nature in an allegorical scheme. This is not simply about playing with genre, however; it exposes the constructed practice and ultimate fallacy of using nature as a form of intellectual property. Real birds and environments in this poem are, thus, given a new impetus in a growing critical context which places emphasis on the roles and agencies of non-human categories in medieval culture and texts.

Paper -b:
'Not al on slepe, ne fully waking' - thus the narrator of the Cuckoo and the Nightingale describes himself; those of The Floure and the Leafe and the Complaint of a Lover's Lyfe claim to be fully awake. The content of these poems is clearly fictional, fantastical, and highly imaginative, suggestive of the dream-vision genre, yet in the absence of a framing dream narrative to justify these fantastical elements, it is difficult to interpret how readers are expected to gauge them as representations of truth or fiction. This paper will read these hypnagogic and waking narrators in the light of contemporary medical, cognitive, and dream theories to interrogate alternative accounts of the physiological origins, intellectual genesis, role, and understanding of fiction in medieval culture.

Session

535
TitleTrade in the Mediterranean, I: The Early and Central Middle Ages
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserDaniele Morossi, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
 
Moderator/ChairJames Hill, History Department, Harrow International School Beijing
 
Paper 535-a 'Adriatic Sea of Fire': Commercial and Political Relations in the 12th Century
(Language: English)
Daniele Morossi, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 535-b Products and Partners: Byzantine Commercial Activities in the Northern Black Sea Region - Crimean Cherson as the Centre of Trade
(Language: English)
Martina Čechová, Institute of Slavonic Studies, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague
 
AbstractThis session is the first part of the series on trade in the Mediterranean and focuses on the early and central Middle Ages. It explores aspects of trade, particularly involving Venice, the Adriatic Sea, and the Byzantine area. This session will highlight through an analysis of amphorae findings and of written commercial documents the developing commercial role of Venice between the early and central Middle Ages, both in the Adriatic and in the Byzantine areas.

Session

604
TitleViking Monuments and Legacies
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairNelleke IJssennagger, Faculteit der Letteren, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen / Archaeological & Medieval Collections, Frisian Museum, Leeuwarden
 
Paper 604-a The Holy Hinterland: Christianisation and Material Culture in Hiberno-Scandinavian Rathdown, County Dublin
(Language: English)
Gillian Boazman, Department of Archaeology, University College Cork
Paper 604-b Coincidence and Connection in Norse and Gaelic Castles on Scotland's Northern and Western Coasts
(Language: English)
William Wyeth, English Heritage
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The half-barony of Rathdown, south of the Hiberno-Scandinavian port town of Dublin, possesses the highest density of early medieval ecclesiastical sites in mainland Ireland as well as a very large proportion of land designated crossland. It contains rare excavation evidence of Scandinavian rural settlement. This is combined with a number of small, pre-Norman, mortared stone churches and a unique body of stone sculpture. The paper considers this evidence in the context of interaction between the Scandinavian incomers and the existing Irish population: a dual acculturation which became integral to the dynamic that drove the 12th-century transformation of Irish church organisation.

Paper -b:
The Viking heritage of Scotland's northern and western coasts and islands is well known. Less explored is the origin and function of a series of castle sites dating from the mid-12th century onwards, epitomised by Cubbie Roo and Old Wick, centred on Orkney and Caithness respectively. Furthermore, few conclusive efforts have so far been made to connect these sites to the series of impressive West Coast castles such as Tioram, Kisimul, Dunstaffnage, and Mingary. This paper first outlines a new group of Norse castles before discussing their relevance and value to the study of better-known and better-preserved West Coast castles.

Session

1518
TitleWastelands or Wonderlands?: Interpreting Medieval Landscapes
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairCatherine A. M. Clarke, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
 
Paper 1518-a Between Guthlac and Hereward: Contrasting Ideals of Fenland Sustenance
(Language: English)
Joseph Grossi, Department of English, University of Victoria, British Columbia
Paper 1518-b Charnwood Circles: Relationships between People and Place in Medieval Charnwood Forest, Leicestershire
(Language: English)
Ann Stones, Centre for English Local History, University of Leicester
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The Fenland of eastern England has been called 'liminal' by scholars of Anglo-Saxon literature, history, and archaeology. Surely one of the most variously depicted food-source landscapes in the Middle Ages, the Fenland is idealized on one hand in Felix's Vita sancti Guthlaci (ca. 730-40) as the austere testing-ground of a hermit's piety, as the English equivalent to the Antonine desert, and on the other hand in Richard of Ely's Gesta Herwardi (ca. 1110-30) as a locus amoenus, a 'delightful place' whose endless bounty can nourish English rebels indefinitely against William the Conqueror. Exploring this contrast allows us to understand better how different literary genres can imaginatively re-work elemental and alimentary features of the natural environment.

Paper -b:
This paper asks if the landscape of medieval Charnwood Forest in Leicestershire was a barrier to cultural interaction or if it was, instead, a central resource and cultural meeting place. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted in order to explore relationships between those who interacted with this woodland landscape. Findings indicate that medieval Charnwood was different to surrounding areas in terms of topography, land use, and settlement. However, the marginality of Charnwood may have been overemphasized. Far from being an inhospitable wilderness, medieval Charnwood was a utilised landscape - one that was central to the culture and economy of surrounding communities.