Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.

If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 602Care of the Past and Care of the King in the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig
Session 1115Caucasian Connections, II: Global Armenian Culture and the Empires
Session 516Cities and Scholars in the Islamic World
Session 1325Constructions Matérielles du Sacré et du Infernal au Théâtre / Material Constructions of the Holy and the Diabolic on Stage
Session 133Consumption, Demand, and Material Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia, I: Sources
Session 333Consumption, Demand, and Material Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia, III: Consumption and Consumers
Session 531Debating Agency and Materiality in Medieval Central Europe
Session 847Discussions of Church and Clergy in Medieval Central and Eastern Europe
Session 354Dressed to Impress: Records of Medieval Luxury Clothing
Session 1209Episcopacy and Christian Traditions in Medieval North Africa and Nubia
Session 301Esoteric Knowledge in Anglo-Saxon England, III: Adaptation and Transmission
Session 552Forms of Domestic Consumption in Medieval Britain and France
Session 1608Hope and Uncertainty in Medieval Europe and the Near East, II: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Hope in Architecture
Session 717Horse History, III: Horse Breeding and Care
Session 213Legal Texts and Their Readers: Using Law in Medieval Europe, II - Clavis Canonum 2.0, Investigating and Using Medieval Canon Law Texts
Session 148Marsilius of Padua in Context
Session 1027Materialising Script: Epigraphy and Inscription
Session 1738Materialities and Religion in Medieval Armenia and Byzantium
Session 1134Matter in the Natural Philosophy of Albertus Magnus
Session 1734Matters of Mind
Session 1202Names, Traces, Puzzles: Close Readings of Old English Texts and Manuscripts
Session 1646Negotiating Borders in the Medieval Mediterranean and North Africa
Session 1521New Approaches to Medieval Anglo-Jewry, II: Non-Governmental Sources
Session 206New Perspectives on Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, II
Session 1743Nicholas of Cusa, III: Philosophical Questions
Session 741Passed over Manuscripts and Forgotten Social Transformations during the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig
Session 752Power and Money
Session 139Relics, Pilgrims, and Regional Power in the Later Middle Ages
Session 1002Selves, Others, Strangers: Reading Identities in Old English Poetry
Session 1014Social Organisation of War
Session 103Spolia: Real and Imagined
Session 318The Materiality of Growing Up in Medieval Society
Session 1211Tombs and Epitaphs in Medieval Literature
Session 1647Translating the Bible, Reading, and Salvation, II: The Austrian Translator of the Bible and His Oeuvre - From the Manuscript into the World Wide Web
Session 1235What Is the Matter of/with Medieval Philosophy?, III: The Matter of the Mind and Soul
Session 635Writing Sermons in the Late Middle Ages

Session details

Session

602
TitleCare of the Past and Care of the King in the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserMary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
Christopher Riedel, Department of History, Albion College, Michigan
 
Moderator/ChairCharles Insley, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies / Department of History, University of Manchester
 
Paper 602-a Representations of Past, Present, and Future Rulers in the Diplomas of England and East Francia, c. 930-980
(Language: English)
Alice Hicklin, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Paper 602-b Eadgifu at Eadred's Court, Regis Mater or Caretaker?
(Language: English)
Mary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
 
AbstractThis session explores the reigns of the English kings, Edmund (r. 939-946), Eadred (r. 946-955), and Eadwig (r. 955-959). It aims to bring the reigns of these often passed-over kings into the light through the re-examination of specific primary sources which produce varying representations of the past both during these kings' reigns and also concerning these kings' reigns - thus how the past was cared for in both Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman texts. This session will also explore the care of a king, specifically a sickly one and what that meant for the royal court. All three papers focus on these 'lost' 20 years and will aid in the development of a clearer picture of these decades. Together they will both illuminate our understanding of this understudied period and create a more unified view of the century between Alfred and Æthelred. This session is the sister session to 'Passed over Manuscripts and Forgotten Social Transformations in the reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig'.

Session

1115
TitleCaucasian Connections, II: Global Armenian Culture and the Empires
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorDepartment of History, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
 
OrganiserJohn Latham-Sprinkle, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London / History & Political Science Department, Saint Xavier University, Illinois
 
Moderator/ChairKathryn Franklin, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
 
Paper 1115-a 40 Martyrs of Sebasteia in Bishop Uxtanes' History of Armenians: Vernacular Religious Practice in the Age of Byzantine Expansion
(Language: English)
Kosuke Nakada, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Paper 1115-b The Depiction of the Armenian Warriors in Byzantine and Arabic Sources
(Language: English)
Konstantinos Takirtakoglou, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Ioannina, Greece
 
AbstractThe cultural productions of the Armenian people were by no means limited to the South Caucasus; on the contrary, their interaction with the surrounding empires led to the spread of their culture far beyond their homeland's borders. Takirtakoglu's paper will examine the important place of Armenians in the military forces of both their Byzantine and Islamic neighbours, and Tolidjian will demonstrate the importance of the Ottoman Empire in spreading Armenian architectural styles as far as Macedonia. Nakada will demonstrate how the Armenians' interactions with the Byzantine Empire helped inspire one of their most famous literary productions, the history of Uxtanes.

If you are interesting in submitting a proposal for this session, please contact session organiser John Latham-Sprinkle (580698@soas.ac.uk).

Session

516
TitleCities and Scholars in the Islamic World
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserAnn R. Christys, Independent Scholar, Leeds
 
Moderator/ChairFozia Bora, School of Languages, Cultures & Societies - Arabic, Islamic & Middle Eastern Studies, University of Leeds
 
Paper 516-a Descriptions of Cities in al-Muqaddasi and Ibn Hawqal
(Language: English)
Hugh Kennedy, School of Languages, Cultures & Linguistics, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Paper 516-b Political Quietism in the Hadith Corpus: A Case Study
(Language: English)
Marjan Asi, School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures - Islamic & Middle East Studies, University of Edinburgh
 
AbstractCities and the scholars who worked in them were memorialised in several different genres. This session will present examples of three of them. The first paper presents Islamic writing on cities through the work of two 10th-century CE geographers. The second speaker analyses the work of three scholars active in the Iraqi city of Kufa in the second century of Islam who disseminated a particular Prophetic narration. The third speaker introduced an anthology of Andalusian poets and their works whose underlying narrative may have been very different from that of the previous two, influenced by the Berber dynasty who now ruled al-Andalus.

Session

1325
TitleConstructions Matérielles du Sacré et du Infernal au Théâtre / Material Constructions of the Holy and the Diabolic on Stage
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorSociété Internationale pour l'étude du théâtre médiéval (SITM)
 
OrganiserCora Dietl, Institut für Germanistik, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
 
Moderator/ChairVéronique Dominguez-Guillaume, UFR des Lettres, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens
 
Paper 1325-a Une Pièce Centrale des Représentations de Mystères: La Gueule d’Enfer
(Language: Français)
Mathilde Schwarz, Département de littérature française et comparée, Sorbonne Université, Paris
Paper 1325-b Material Godheads, Made from Stone and Wood: Heathen Idols on the 16th-Century Swiss Stage
(Language: English)
Cora Dietl, Institut für Germanistik, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
 
AbstractThe papers of the session discuss how the principals of immateriality, such as the sacred or divine, and the diabolic, are represented or rather constructed on stage by the use of 'things', which might be understood as symbols or attributes of the divine or diabolic. Paper -a focusses on the hell mouth that was frequently used in 15th-century religious plays, and asks how the material side of these constructions helped to represent the violence and horror of hell in plays like the Mystère de la Passion by Arnoul Gréban. Paper -c compares the representation and critique of 'material godheads', i.e. heathen idols in Catholic and Protestant religious plays that were staged in 16th century Switzerland, in the context of the contemporary discussion of the cult of saints.

Session

133
TitleConsumption, Demand, and Material Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia, I: Sources
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorRenda feudal i fiscalitat a la Catalunya baixmedieval (Refiscat), Universitat de Girona / Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid
 
OrganiserAlba Jennifer Pérez Álvarez, Facultat de Lletres, Universitat de Girona
 
Moderator/ChairAina Palarea Marimon, Department of History & Civilization, European University Institute, Firenze
 
Paper 133-a Material Legacy as a Marker for Distinction between Late Medieval Catalan Aristocrats: The Post-Mortem Inventory of Bernat De Tagamanent (d. 1376)
(Language: English)
Alejandro Martínez Giralt, Centre de Recerca d'Història Rural, Universitat de Girona
Paper 133-b The Wealth of the Poor: An Approach to the Material Culture in the Hospital of the Holy Cross through Economic Registers
(Language: English)
Jaume Marcé Sánchez, Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals (IRCVM), Universitat de Barcelona
 
AbstractThe first session of the series 'Consumption, Demand and Material Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia' will focus on some of the archival sources that researchers can use in order to study these aspects in three different contexts: cities, a noble's house and assistance institutions. The first speaker will present documents of fiscal nature, which allow the study and the measurement of wealth and inequality in Catalan cities. The second will present a case study: that of a post-mortem inventory of a Catalan low noble. Finally, the third speaker will tell us about the sources that detail the properties of those who were assisted by the Hospital of the Holy Cross of Barcelona.

Session

333
TitleConsumption, Demand, and Material Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia, III: Consumption and Consumers
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorRenda feudal i fiscalitat a la Catalunya baixmedieval (Refiscat), Universitat de Girona
 
OrganiserLaura Miquel Milian, Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona
 
Moderator/ChairJaume Marcé Sánchez, Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals (IRCVM), Universitat de Barcelona
 
Paper 333-a Cloth Trade and Cloth Traders in a Medieval Catalan Small Town: The Case of Peralada, c. 1300
(Language: English)
Víctor Eduardo Farías Zurita, Departament d'Humanitats, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
Paper 333-b Who Is Who?: Social Differentiation through the Material Possessions Found in the Households of Late Medieval Catalonia
(Language: English)
Aina Palarea Marimon, Department of History & Civilization, European University Institute, Firenze
 
AbstractThe final session that concludes the series 'Consumption, Demand, and Material Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia' will focus on both consumers and consumption during 14th and 15th c. Catalonia. The first speaker will explore the textile consumption in Peralada before the Black Death by looking at debt contracts made to textile merchants (drapers). Instead, the second speaker will focus on the period after the Black Death. She will give a more general view of consumption patterns and its evolution through time by analyzing hundreds of probate inventories.

Session

531
TitleDebating Agency and Materiality in Medieval Central Europe
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairBeata Możejko, Instytut Historii, Uniwersytet Gdański
 
Paper 531-a What to Do with My Child's Head?: Artificial Cranial Deformation as a Form of People's Agency
(Language: English)
Astrid Schmölzer, Institut für Archäologie, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Paper 531-b Material Culture from a River and a Question of Its Secularity versus Sacredness: The Case of Medieval Swords from the Ljubljanica
(Language: English)
Tomaž Nabergoj, Narodni Muzej Slovenije, Ljubljana
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Artificial Cranial Deformation (ACD) is a phenomenon known worldwide. In my paper I will focus on the findings in Middle Europe from the 4th to the 6th century. To deform children's heads was the decision of their parents. This makes the infantile human body a place of (body) art and gives rise to the question of motivation behind this practice. The findings show that no connection between social status and ACD can be demonstrated. ACD is thus linking the individual with the cultural environment of the parental generation. In my paper I will consult the attempts of human agency, which can bring new insights to this phenomenon of the ancient world.

Paper -b:
More than 50 medieval swords (11th-15th century) were found in the Ljubljanica river which, as an important communication route in central Slovenia from prehistory onwards, yielded thousands of finds from all periods. The swords are analysed in contexts of broader material evidence from the river and surrounding Ljubljana marshes, as well as within the possible network of settlements, ports, fords, and routes. They are not interpreted as being intentionally thrown into the Ljubljanica due to their symbolic meaning or as part of a cult but primarily reflect the communication role of the river and the strategic importance of Ljubljana in relation to medieval Carniola and Slovene lands.

Session

847
TitleDiscussions of Church and Clergy in Medieval Central and Eastern Europe
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMaroula Perisanidi, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
 
Paper 847-a 'Eos qui sunt publice uxorati non admittatis': The Issue of Clerical Celibacy in Poland in the 12th and 13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Karolina Morawska, Wydział Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Paper 847-b Historiographic Approaches to the Church in Kievan Rus'
(Language: English)
Leandro César S. Neves, Instituto de Filosofia e Ciências Sociais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Clerical celibacy has been an ideal already since the Apostolic Age, however before the Gregorian Reform no one made any attempts to enforce it, except for several bishops deeply concerned about the condition of the Church. The fight for clerical celibacy actually began with the activities of the 11th-century popes: not only Gregory VII, but also his predecessors issued provisions aimed at introducing the obligatory celibacy for the clergy. These regulations were adopted in Poland and other Central European countries with a considerable delay. Local priests often expressed their resistance and tried to avoid separation with their wives, concubines, and families. It is the main object of the current paper to examine the reception of the imposed standards of clerical celibacy by the society of medieval Poland, with a special emphasis of the priests and their families, who did not always intend to adapt to these new standards obediently.

Paper -b:
In this paper, we aim to elucidate some historiographical approaches regarding the Church in Kievan Rus', particularly during the 11th century. We seek to analyze the ways that the specialized bibliography, both classic/modern and Russian/Western, addresses the subject in social, institutional, and cultural aspects. Finally, we attempt to contribute to the current state of said historiography by using theoretical considerations from authors such as Dominique Iogna-Prat, Michel Lauwers, and Leandro Rust, specialists in Western Church History who seek to approach the ecclesial system from the socio-institutional perspective of the 'Ecclesiology', and how such views can corroborate the understanding of the Church of Rus'.

Session

354
TitleDressed to Impress: Records of Medieval Luxury Clothing
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairGerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
 
Paper 354-a Jewelry in the Medieval German Artusroman: Beyond Fiction, Reality, and Expectations
(Language: English)
Stefanie Schoeberl, Department of German, University of California, Davis
Paper 354-b Fabric, Flesh, and Sartorial Significance: Dressing the Part at the 14th-Century English Court
(Language: English)
Ella Muir, Department of Humanities, University of Roehampton
 
AbstractPaper -a:
This paper examines the role of jewels set in armor in German Artusroman and contextualizes it within the general symbolism of jewelry in the 12th century courtly society. In the reality of the Arthurian Romance, where historical fiction meets the contemporary perspective of the audience, the knight in jeweled armor is a common stylistic figure (Doniger 2017). The gemstones used in armor are often made from exotic materials of extraordinary value, bearing deeper symbolic and materialistic significance (Bates 2003). Using historical as well as literary evidence I will show the significance of bejeweled armor in Hartmann's Erek and Iwein as well as Wolfram's Parzival.

Paper -b:
Fabrics, hues and heraldry carried weighty cultural significance at the court of England in the 14th century. Material extravagance and ceremonial ritual were markers and makers of power - yet those who sought to subvert their social standing through fashion often did so at their peril. Chronicles, trousseaux, and an array of surviving household accounts show Queen Isabella of France (1295-1358) and her contemporaries consciously used clothing to 'speak' on their behalf: as commentary, consensus - or as a means of challenging the status quo. Whether when dressed in her wedding gown, adopting the garb synonymous with bereavement, or swathed in sumptuous blood-red velvet and flanked by her alleged lover, Isabella, like so many royal women before and after her forged through fabric and flesh a performative sartorial body: a social skin, imbued with the power to uphold the authority of King and Crown - or to bend it to her will.

Session

1209
TitleEpiscopacy and Christian Traditions in Medieval North Africa and Nubia
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairRobin Whelan, Department of History, University of Liverpool
 
Paper 1209-a Bâtisseur ou évergète: l’évêque dans sa cité en Afrique tardo-antique
(Language: Français)
Mohamed-Arbi Nsiri, Département d'histoire, Université Paris Nanterre
Paper 1209-b Religious Conflict and Spatial Factors: The Cases of Mauretania Sitifensis and Mauretania Caesariensis in Vandal Africa
(Language: English)
Aleksander Paradziński, Institute of History, University of Warsaw
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Restés des personnes privées, les évêques n'eurent pas, aux IVe et Ve siècles, d'autorité officielle dans la cité. Pourtant, leur rôle y fut considérable à partir de la seconde moitié du IVe siècle, quand leur fonction s'apparenta à celle des patrons des cités classiques, pour leur mission d'assistance aux démunis, de protection des humbles, d'incitation à la clémence auprès des juges. Ce processus connut sa pleine mesure quand, en beaucoup d'endroits, l'usage prévalut de recruter les évêques parmi les aristocrates ou les notables. On constate dès la fin du IVe siècle que des aristocrates ont recherché l'épiscopat, jugé souvent une honorable fin de carrière, et que le peuple des cités les a poussés à l'accepter, jugeant que la mission de protection et de bienfaisance dévolue à leurs ancêtres pouvait être assumée plus efficacement grâce à cette fonction désormais prestigieuse. Il n'est donc pas étonnant qu'ils y aient transposé les méthodes et les formes traditionnelles du patronat. Cependant, toute une série de témoignages, transmis notamment par la correspondance de saint Augustin, révèle d'importantes différences. En effet, leur mission de protection des pauvres et des opprimés amena souvent les évêques à s'opposer aux intérêts des notables, ce qui n'était pas le cas des patrons des cités classiques.

Paper -b:
In my paper I am going to focus on the role of spatial factors and conditions in the conflict between 'Arian' and 'Nicene' Churches at the time of the persecution of Vandal King Huneric. I am going to present and analyse the evidence for the dynamic of this conflict and its results in two former Roman provinces: Mauretania Caesariensis and Mauretania Sitifensis. This evidence is based on the Notitia provinciarum et civitatum Africae and Modéran's reading of this source. Processing it into a GIS database allowed me to map the 'Nicene' episcopal network as well as discern patterns of struggle with its 'Arian' counterpart. Connections between episcopal seats of bishops, who decided to switch their doctrinal allegiance, are examined in the broader context of the regional landscape, road systems, and foci of Vandal kings' influence and power, revealing the spatial aspect of this conflict and effectiveness of royal religious policies.

Session

301
TitleEsoteric Knowledge in Anglo-Saxon England, III: Adaptation and Transmission
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserCaroline R. Batten, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford
 
Moderator/ChairBritton Elliott Brooks, Center for Global Communication Strategies (CGCS), University of Tokyo
 
Paper 301-a A Long Time Ago in a Locality Far Far Away: Depicting Distant Geographies in Ælfric's 'Life of St Thomas’
(Language: English)
Luisa Ostacchini, Wolfson College, University of Oxford
Paper 301-b Finding Knowledge in Darkness
(Language: English)
Helen Appleton, Balliol College, University of Oxford
 
AbstractThese three linked sessions examine the creation, presentation, and communication of 'esoteric knowledge' in Anglo-Saxon England: forms of knowledge, or modes of conveying knowledge, that may not have been readily available to a wide audience or that were intentionally enigmatic in register or content. Each session explores performances, translations, and uses of materials that are obscure, inexplicable, or mysterious. We will also strive to address forms of knowledge in Anglo-Saxon England that are treated as esoteric or 'unsolvable' in modern scholarship, and investigate what literary, scientific, or religious understanding can be gained through their close examination. Our third session examines the ways in which Old English texts adapt knowledge from classical and continental sources.

Session

552
TitleForms of Domestic Consumption in Medieval Britain and France
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMichael Carter, Curatorial Department, English Heritage, London
 
Paper 552-a New Looks on Meat Food in Medieval Provence: The Joint Contribution of Archival and Archaeozoological Data
(Language: English)
Roxanne Cesarini, Laboratoire d'archéologie médiévale et moderne en Méditerranée (LA3M - UMR 7298), Aix-Marseille Université
Dianne Unsain, Laboratoire d'archéologie médiévale et moderne en Méditerranée (LA3M - UMR 7298), Aix-Marseille Université
Paper 552-b The Wheel-Plough in Medieval Britain
(Language: English)
Janken Myrdal, Department of Economic History & International Relations, Stockholms Universitet
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Studies on animal consumption (products/by-products) are central to tackle issues of taste and culinary practices in a given context, but also topics as diverse as economics, social differences, and agro-pastoral practices. We propose to broach these different points to discuss the existence of a possible Provencal consumption model in the Middle Ages, based on the comparison of archival and zooarchaeological data. In this perspective, the acquisition and management of animal resources will be addressed through the study of animal sizes, herd composition, and mobility. Then, we will base on the raw material (product/by-product) to consider the types of production, trade, consumption, and management of culinary waste. The objective is to identify similarities and particularities that will be the driving force behind a reflection on the social identity of consumers.

Paper -b:
The wheel-plough is regarded as a principal agrarian innovation. Certainly modern research has identified a long and complex history; nevertheless a major change occurred in the centuries around the 11th century, with larger shares, etc. In a project Janken Myrdal and Alexandra Sapoznik combine an investigation of details in English manorial accounts, archaeological finds, experiments and images. One of the goals is to show the enormous iron-consumption caused by the ploughs with larger shares in the High Middle Ages. Another goal is to show that this enormous machine was vulnerable, and perhaps its efficiency has been overestimated.

Session

1608
TitleHope and Uncertainty in Medieval Europe and the Near East, II: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Hope in Architecture
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorSonderforschungsbereich 'Visions of Community' (Austrian Science Fund, FWF F42)
 
OrganiserRutger Kramer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Daniel Mahoney, Annemarie-Schimmel-Kolleg 'History & Society during the Mamluk Era (1250-1517)', Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
 
Moderator/ChairJo Van Steenbergen, Henri Pirenne Institute for Medieval Studies / Department of Languages & Cultures - Near East & Islamic World, Universiteit Gent
 
Paper 1608-a United under the 'Dome of Heaven': Aspirational Architecture and Civil Strife in Early Islam
(Language: English)
Heba Mostafa, Department of History of Art / Graduate Department of Art, University of Toronto
Paper 1608-b The Beginning of Wisdom: Terror, Hope, and the Majesty of God
(Language: English)
Han Tame, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
 
AbstractThis session shows how public art and architecture function as expressions of hopefulness in Islamic and Christian contexts. Mostafa explores the Islamic 'heavenly dome' as a dramatic cultural expression of early Muslims; communal gatherings under such domes solidified multiple Arabo-Islamic identities and countered conflict by healing political divides. Tame's paper examines how the sculptural programmes of early Gothic church portals prepared viewers for entry into the church; the fear and hope they generated were also a first step towards salvation.

Session

717
TitleHorse History, III: Horse Breeding and Care
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserGwendolyne Knight, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms Universitet
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
 
Moderator/ChairGwendolyne Knight, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms Universitet
 
RespondentJennifer Jobst, Independent Scholar, Sunset Valley, Texas
 
Paper 717-a 'Medicines for Horses': Textual Transmission of the Central Middle English Horse-Care Text
(Language: English)
Kelly-Anne Gilbertson, Department of English, University of Johannesburg
Paper 717-b Horse Breeding in the New Forest: A Modern Paradigm of Medieval Practice
(Language: English)
Gail Brownrigg, Independent Scholar, Dorking
 
AbstractThis is one of a series of sessions on the medieval horse, which looks into aspects of breeding and treating horses. How to cure a sick horse? How to get the best possible supply of horses with minimum investment? How to judge a horse's temperament by taking a mere look at the animal? These questions preoccupied people in the Middle Ages, just as they are of paramount importance to horsemen today. The speakers approach the theme from a variety of disciplines, including history of the text and art history, as well as by bringing in their unique experience of horsemanship and horse care.

Session

213
TitleLegal Texts and Their Readers: Using Law in Medieval Europe, II - Clavis Canonum 2.0, Investigating and Using Medieval Canon Law Texts
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorIuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio (ICMAC)
 
OrganiserDanica Summerlin, Department of History, University of Sheffield
 
Moderator/ChairGreta Austin, Department of Religion, University of Puget Sound, Washington
 
Paper 213-a The Future of the Clavis Canonum Database: A Technical Perspective
(Language: English)
Clemens Radl, Monumenta Germaniae Historica, München
Paper 213-b Using Papal Registers in Canon Law Collections in the Late 12th Century
(Language: English)
Danica Summerlin, Department of History, University of Sheffield
 
AbstractThe last two decades have seen the return to prominence of the overarching question of continuity and change across medieval canon law, helping to understand who had access to law, and how they chose to employ it. This session focusses on a critical database known as the Clavis Canonum. It seeks to demonstrate how this digital resource is being re-invigorated, and how the results of that renewal can illustrate the continued employment and even the adaptation of sources of canon law over the medieval period, and particularly spanning the appearance of the Decretum of Gratian.

Session

148
TitleMarsilius of Padua in Context
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserFrank Godthardt, Independent Scholar, Hamburg
 
Moderator/ChairThomas Turley, Department of History, Santa Clara University, California
 
Paper 148-a Three Dominicans and Marsilius
(Language: English)
Thomas Turley, Department of History, Santa Clara University, California
Paper 148-b How to Implement a New Ecclesiology, or Not: Emperor Ludwig IV's Appointment of John of Jandun as Bishop of Ferrara
(Language: English)
Frank Godthardt, Independent Scholar, Hamburg
 
AbstractThis session connects Marsilius of Padua's political, philosophical, and ecclesiological thought with his time and life. Thomas Turley explores the different approaches to argument in the tracts de potestate papae of the Dominican theologians Hervaeus Natalis, Peter of Palude, and William Peter Godin, and their potential influence on Marsilius. Frank Godthardt reviews the unique and remarkably detailed imperial charter of John of Jandun's appointment as bishop particularly with regard to Marsilius of Padua's Defensor pacis and his ecclesiology.

Session

1027
TitleMaterialising Script: Epigraphy and Inscription
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMarco Mostert, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
 
Paper 1027-a Runic Writing and Material Change: The Case of Medieval Runica Manuscripta
(Language: English)
Julia-Sophie Heier, Institut für Nordische Philologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Paper 1027-b Date épigraphique et matérialité
(Language: Français)
Morgane Uberti, Casa de Velazquez, Madrid
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The runic script is a primarily epigraphic script carved into objects of various material like wood, stone or metal. It was the dominant writing system in Scandinavia until the end of the 10th century, when it was gradually replaced by the Latin alphabet and manuscript culture. This leads to a new form of runic writing called Runica manuscripta, which resulted from the transposition of a formerly epigraphic writing system into the medium manuscript. This paper compares the medieval Bryggen inscriptions on wood with Runica manuscripta and discusses how the change of material and medium affected the runic script.

Paper -b:
La communication a pour objectif de nourrir la discussion sur la place des 'matérialities' dans l’approche de la culture écrite : si une matière durable compte comme une spécificité de l’écriture épigraphique, que réalise la rencontre écriture-matière au-delà de la seule pérennité d’un message?

Dans l’Espagne médiévale (XIIe-XIVes.), des inscriptions se limitant à une date seule - les datationes - permettent d’approcher au plus près l’articulation écriture-matière-environnement. Traditionnellement, la date accompagne la mention de l’événement, elle précise la commémoration. Pour les datationes, s’il y a date, les conditions d’existence, factuelles, de cette date sont tues. La matière et son contexte deviennent a priori les seuls éléments permettant de donner du sens à cette chrono-graphie. Partant de ces traces épigraphiques réduites à la seule évocation d’un point du temps sans l’identifier, la communication vient questionner les possibilités qu’offre la matière et son contexte face à l’implicite de l’écriture épigraphique : la matière qui est aussi support (chapiteau, mur de l’église) suffit-elle par exemple à unir date et lieu ?

Session

1738
TitleMaterialities and Religion in Medieval Armenia and Byzantium
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/Chair To Be Announced
 
Paper 1738-a Representation of Material Objects in Medieval Culture: Statue or Doll in Byzantine Mythography?
(Language: English)
Katherine Anna New, Faculty of Medieval & Modern Languages, University of Oxford
Paper 1738-b Medieval Byzantine Coinage in the Patrimonio Nacional: Image, Materiality, and Religion
(Language: English)
Carmen Morais Puche, Dirección de las Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Madrid
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The paper traces the origin and functions of the material representation of the heroine's dead husband, as described by a 12th-century Byzantine mythographer Ioаnnis Tzetzes in The Chiliades (2.20). The Medieval material representation ('a wooden image of Protesilaus' shape') is traced back to its Classical sources (The Iliad 2. 695-704; Cypria, fr. 1.10; Pausanius IV.2.74; Euripides' Protesilaus, recorded by Aristides, Lucian, Apollodorus, Eustathius, Hyginus; Ovid's Heroides XIII; Catullus' Elegy 68). The paper argues that Tzetzes' version reflects mythological views on the reanimation of a dead likeness, corresponding to the transformation of a living being into an immobile object, which is deprived of life. In contrast to Classical mythology, in medieval culture a statue receives an ambivalent treatment: on the one hand, as an object of art, designed for the appreciation of the audience which becomes a receiving addressee; and on the other hand, as an object endowed with the functions of play. The conflation of a living subject with a statue (as in the Ancient tradition) or a doll (as in medieval culture) is capable of generating not only a playful but also tragic conceptualization, prefiguring a later mythological image of a threatening (potentially perilous) statue.

Paper -b:
Patrimonio Nacional Numismatic Collection is still a great unknown among the Spanish Royal Collections, although it is comprised by more than 15,000 coins. These include 200 items of Byzantine coinage. For the last year we have been carrying out inventories, photography, and studies in a systematic manner (by series and provenances) to enhance its value. A large proportion of the numismatic collection belonged to Baldiri de Riera, former worker of Reales Loterías who became Numismatic at the Royal Library by giving his substantial collection of coins to Ferdinand VII in 1815

This paper is seeking to provide a glimpse of the Byzantine series, its variety and richness to make an approach to the materiality of the coins and the religious iconography on monetary types of either face of the coin. On the reverse, the representation of Christ's facing bust is to a considerable degree generalized and conventionalized at the 10th and 11th centuries, following Justinian II types. Meanwhile on the 'heads' we will find a portrait gallery depicting Byzantine Emperors. This allows us to highlight the power of the money to represent the political and religious authority.

Session

1134
TitleMatter in the Natural Philosophy of Albertus Magnus
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorInternational Albertus Magnus Society (IAMS)
 
OrganiserFranklin T. Harkins, School of Theology & Ministry, Boston College
 
Moderator/ChairIrven Resnick, Department of Philosophy & Religion, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga
 
Paper 1134-a Is the Female Embryo a Proper Human?: Albertus Magnus's Natural Philosophy between the Universal and the Singular
(Language: English)
Evelina Miteva, Centrul de filosofie antică şi medievală, Universitatea Babeş-Bolyai, Cluj-Napoca
Paper 1134-b Albertus Magnus on Providence and Its Workings in Nature: The Case of Plants
(Language: English)
Amalia Cerrito, Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del sapere, Università di Pisa
 
AbstractThis session, sponsored by the International Albertus Magnus Society, seeks to investigate various aspects of Albertus's understanding of matter in the broad context of his natural philosophy, including matter and the generation of forms, matter vis-a-vis the universal and the particular, and the role of matter in change and mutation.

Session

1734
TitleMatters of Mind
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairSara L. Uckelman, Durham Centre for Ancient & Medieval Philosophy, Durham University
 
Paper 1734-a Matter in Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, and Evagrius: From 'creatio ex nihilo' to Subsumption
(Language: English)
Ilaria Ramelli, Graduate School of Theology, Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Detroit / Christ Church, University of Oxford / Institute of Advanced Study - Classics, Durham University
Paper 1734-b Materiality and Spiritual Concepts: Constructed Notions and Common Objects in Alphonse X's Primeyra Partida
(Language: English)
Clara Barros, Centro de Linguística (CLUP) / Centro de Investigação Transdisciplinar 'Cultura, Espaço e Memória' (CITCEM), Universidade do Porto
 
AbstractPaper -a:
I shall address the topic of 'materiality' from the philosophico-theological viewpoint in late antique Christian Platonists: Origen, his follower Gregory Nyssen, and Evagrius, who was inspired by both (and by Plotinus). Origen argued philosophically for the creation of matter ex nihilo, which I shall connect with his view of the soul-body relation and his theory of ensomatosis (as opposed to metensomatosis and his purported theory of the preexistence of disembodied souls). I shall then point out how Nyssen's ingenious theory of the creation of matter from immaterial Ideas in the mind of God relies on Origen, as does also Evagrius' teaching of the unfolding of matter from nous and soul, and its subsumption into soul and nous in the end.

Paper -b:
This paper will attempt to analyse the strategies used to define spiritual or religious notions (such as the concepts of patrono or crisma) in the Portuguese version of Alphonse X's Primeyra Partida. This definition is achieved by linking new information and concepts to well-known objects/substances (and their associated properties) through use of comparative structures. The apprehension of the new information depends upon the identification of the material properties of the objects/substances invoked. Examples of this process will be analysed, as will the strategy which depends upon a common understanding of the physical characteristics of these objects.

Session

1202
TitleNames, Traces, Puzzles: Close Readings of Old English Texts and Manuscripts
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
 
Paper 1202-a The Naming of the Few: Scribal Emphasis of Names in the Works of Ælfric of Eynsham
(Language: English)
Emily Nicolet Rae, School of Critical Studies (English Language & Linguistics), University of Glasgow
Paper 1202-b Cynewulf's Agency: Old English Diegetic Intervention and Crafting Narratorial Status
(Language: English)
Jacob Runner, School of Cultures, Languages & Area Studies / School of English, University of Nottingham
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The texts by the Anglo-Saxon homilist Ælfric of Eynsham are filled with reference to the authorities used in their compilation, from the Church Fathers to more contemporary authors. The homilies also include a plethora of names, including those of emperors, warriors, saints, martyrs, and heathens. Within the manuscripts that contain these texts, the use of capitalisation, enlarged initials, and coloured inks for these names varies from manuscript to manuscript, and sometimes even from homily to homily within a single codex. This paper will investigate this variable treatment of names in specific Ælfrician manuscripts, and identify any patterns in how certain names were visually signalled to the reader, as well as if and how these patterns changed over the centuries.

Paper -b:
Four surviving works of Old English poetry contain interlinear runes which can be arranged to provide the proper name of a poet figure, Cyn(e)wulf. Remarkably, however, comparatively little research has attempted to address the intriguing narrative properties simultaneously attained through the belated introduction of this name. Borrowing concepts of narratology advanced by critical literature theorist, Gérard Genette, this paper assesses the differing ways in which the poems display a compelling structural awareness of narrative presence. Ultimately, it is argued that creative manipulation of shifts in narratorial status parallels thematic concerns and underpins the layered emblematic signification of the 'signature' passages.

Session

1646
TitleNegotiating Borders in the Medieval Mediterranean and North Africa
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAdam Simmons, Department of History, Lancaster University
 
Paper 1646-a Conquest, Bequeath, or Sack?: Exploring the Reason for the Changing Priorities in the Norman Involvement in the Iberian Peninsula
(Language: English)
Lucas Villegas-Aristizábal, Bader International Study Centre, Queen's University, Ontario
Paper 1646-b Roles of Frontier Governors in 15th-Century Northern Morocco
(Language: English)
Tomoaki Shinoda, Research Institute for Languages & Cultures of Asia & Africa, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The Norman involvement in the Iberian Peninsula took place chronologically in opposite sides of this region (east and west). From the late 11th century to the first half of the 12th century it took place on the Levantine side and it had its own unique characteristics that culminated with the donation of the principality of Tarragona to Robert Burdet and the Anglo-Norman settlements in the city of Tortosa. In the second half of the 12th century the majority of the Norman involvement gravitated towards the Portuguese frontier. Apart from this regional difference their participation in these two areas was also distinct in its impact and development. While the Normans who took part in the early phase seems to have been interested in conquest and settlement, those involved in the second phase tended to prefer sacking and moving on. For example, after the Norman conquests in the Ebro Valley from 1123 to 1148 a number of low- and high-ranking Norman contingents profited with land in this area deciding to stay in the new frontier's towns and farmsteads. Robert Burdet as mentioned was even granted the city of Tarragona as a Papal fief with a high level of autonomy in 1128. In contrast, on the western side of the peninsula, after the ill-fated attempt to conquer Lisbon c. 1142, the majority of Norman contingents preferred to continue with their sea journey towards the Holy Land after the capture of coastal cities (Faro, Silves, and Santarem). The only exception to this seems to have been the conquest of Lisbon in 1147. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast these two phases of the Norman involvement in the peninsular wars against the Muslim inhabitants. How decisive was the influence of the Crusades to the Levant in this change of priorities? Was the rising antagonism between the Norman and their local Christian allies an important factor in this change of strategy? Finally, the section will compare the Norman conquests in the peninsula during these two phases with other areas of Norman interventions in the Mediterranean such as southern Italy and the Holy Land.

Paper -b:
The Muslim-Christian frontier in the medieval Mediterranean was space where religious and political antagonism governed. Nonetheless, it was also space where various inter-religious relationships developed because of material concerns. Much the same is true on the 15th century Portuguese-Moroccan frontier that came into existence after the Portuguese conquest of Africa. While conducting war against infidels and monitoring the cross-border movement of people, the frontier governors needed these relationships to fill their role such as acquiring supplies and freeing captives. In this paper, we analyse letters sent by a Muslim governor to the King of Portugal and show how he tried to keep in contact with the King to ensure these relationships.

Session

1521
TitleNew Approaches to Medieval Anglo-Jewry, II: Non-Governmental Sources
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorJewish Historical Society of England
 
Moderator/ChairDean A. Irwin, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
 
Paper 1521-a Whose History?: Studying the Vita et passio Willelmi Norwicensis
(Language: English)
Miri Rubin, School of History, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper 1521-b Rabbinic Responsa from Medieval England: Towards a Complete Edition
(Language: English)
Pinchas Roth, Department of Talmud & Oral Law, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan
 
AbstractThe past decade has seen a growth in interest in medieval Anglo-Jewish studies. That has seen a number of mainstream medievalists touch on the topic as part of isolated publications, as well as a growing number of scholars specialising in the area. That new generation of scholarship has been less reliant on printed calendars of documents and has, instead, been more adventurous in their use of sources. This panel will seek to explore the literary and rabbinical sources relating to the Jews of medieval England and how they can advance our understanding of the medieval Anglo-Jewish community.

Session

206
TitleNew Perspectives on Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, II
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorInstitute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
 
OrganiserLen Scales, Department of History, Durham University
 
Moderator/ChairBjörn Weiler, Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
 
Paper 206-a Wonder of the World or Blasphemous Sinner?: The Many Deaths of Frederick II in Contemporary Historiography
(Language: English)
Manuel Kamenzin, Historisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Paper 206-b Appearances of Frederick II in the Rhine Area in 1285: How to Represent Oneself in Order to be Recognized as a True Emperor
(Language: English)
Anna Gerstein, Institute of World History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow
 
AbstractThis session examines aspects of the reign of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen (1194-1250), concentrating particularly upon Frederick's reign in Germany and on the construction of contemporary and posthumous medieval images of Frederick in historiography, myth, and folklore. Paper A applies quantitative methods to reassess Frederick's relations with the German princes, while papers B and C explore the mythologizing, respectively, of aspects of his personality and of his death. A fourth paper examines a late-13th-century instance of impersonation of Frederick in Germany.

Session

1743
TitleNicholas of Cusa, III: Philosophical Questions
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorCusanus Society of the UK & Ireland
 
OrganiserWilliam P. Hyland, School of Divinity, University of St Andrews
 
Moderator/ChairWilliam P. Hyland, School of Divinity, University of St Andrews
 
RespondentSilvianne Aspray, Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 1743-a The Shape of Being In Cusanus's Metaphysics
(Language: English)
Luca Burzelli, Classe di Lettere e Filosofia, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa
Paper 1743-b Beauty and Contemplation with Special Attention to Nicholas of Cusa's De Visione Dei
(Language: English)
James Bryson, Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge
 
AbstractThis section will explore various ontological aspects of the thought of Cusanus, and the ways Cusanus articulated the ontology of number, as well as the Divine Essence and the Being of created things. In doing so it will explore the role of language, paradox, and epistemology in Cusanus' philosophical speculation, including the question of whether a model of analogia entis might or might not be possible for Cusanus' Metaphysics.

Session

741
TitlePassed over Manuscripts and Forgotten Social Transformations during the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserMary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
Christopher Riedel, Department of History, Albion College, Michigan
 
Moderator/ChairMary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
 
Paper 741-a The Materiality of Reform: Re-Examining the Benedictine Context of English Caroline Minuscule
(Language: English)
Colleen Curran, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford
Paper 741-b 'Eallum folce, ge yldrum ge gingrum': Social Transformation during the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig, 939-959
(Language: English)
Stuart Pracy, Department of History, University of Manchester
 
AbstractEdmund (r.939-946), Eadred (r.946-955), and Eadwig (r.955-959) ruled parts or all of England for twenty years, yet they are often ignored in favor of the men who came before or after them with little research being dedicated to these kings in their own right. But how did the English kingdom develop from Æthelstan, arguably the first king of England, to the imperial coronation and Benedictine Reform of Edgar’s reign? This session aims to bring the reigns of these often passed-over kings into the light through the re-examination of specific manuscripts produced during this period and a new approach to Anglo-Saxon social status. The papers focus on these 'lost' twenty years and will aid in the development of a clearer picture of these decades. Together they will both illuminate our understanding of this understudied period and create a more unified view of the century between Alfred and Æthelred.

Session

752
TitlePower and Money
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairSilke Schwandt, Fakultät für Geschichtswissenschaft, Philosophie und Theologie, Universität Bielefeld
 
Paper 752-a Familial Ambition in the Knighting Ceremony of Amaury de Montfort
(Language: English)
Louis Pulford, Department of History, Lancaster University
Paper 752-b Power as Money, Money as Power: Reassessing Regency in the Latin East
(Language: English)
Charlotte Gauthier, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Described by Peter les Vaux-de-Cernay as a 'novel and unprecedented form of induction into knighthood', the knighting of Amaury de Montfort on the feast of St John the Baptist 1213 defied convention; rather than being elevated to knighthood by a senior secular lord as custom dictated, Amaury was instead knighted by the bishops of Orleans and Auxerre having been led to the altar by his father on one side, and his mother on the other. The ceremony, therefore, offers not only an intriguing perspective on the nature of knighthood in the early 13th century, but also an insight in to how rituals could be used as a means of elevating one's family, providing a springboard for dynastic ambitions. Amaury's father, Simon de Montfort, had been the leader of the Albigensian Crusade since the initial campaign to expunge Cathar heretics from the region in 1209. In the years between the Crusade’s beginning and the knighting of Amaury, Simon and his crusaders had carved a small principality in the Midi, usurping the Trencavel lands around Carcassonne and increasingly encroaching upon the lands of the Count of Toulouse. The knighting of Amaury de Montfort, whilst seldom examined, has often been considered in terms of the crusading ambition that drew his father to the Languedoc in 1209. Maurice Keen especially, has suggested that the use of an episcopal dubbing was intended to reflect Simon's affiliation with the reform of Christian society and the role that he envisaged chivalry playing in that reform. And yet, Keen's analysis of the ritual ignores the role of Amaury's mother, Alice, in an intrinsically male rite of passage, a role that suggests a familial motive behind the atypicality of the ceremony. The act of both of his parents physically leading Amaury to his knighting suggests that the ritual sought to publicly proclaim that the next generation of the Montfort family would continue to be dedicated in their service of Christ, as both Simon and Alice had been. Amaury's knighting, therefore, conformed to a dynastic identity that his parents were seeking to promote. Indeed, the fact that the Montfort's sidestepped secular authority by turning to princes of the church to knight their son suggests that they were using the ritual as a means of establishing a dynasty that was independent from senior secular authority. Through turning to the church, the Montfort's seem to have been trying to make their power in the Languedoc absolute. Even their rivals, the Raymondines of Toulouse owed fealty to both the kings of France and Aragon. Amaury, however, did not kneel in supplication before any secular lord, he only knelt before God. Amaury's knighting displays, therefore, how a ritual, whilst only having a direct effect upon one person, could have a wider effect on those around them. The ritual not only elevated Amaury's authority, but also the authority of his entire family, making them accountable to none but God.

Paper -b:
In 1268 Maria of Antioch, granddaughter of the last reigning Queen of Jerusalem, stepped before the Haute Cour to claim her right to the regency – and therefore, by law, to the queenship – of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. After a contentious trial in which Maria herself delivered a subtle and learned legal argument in front of the assembled noblemen, her claims were passed over in favour of a male relative who in 1264 had used Maria’s own legal argument to win the regency of Cyprus.

Was this defeat due to her gender, as some later contemporaries claimed, or was there another principle at play in a kingdom that had nominally been governed by women for long periods of its history, and whose succession had so often been a matter for the courts to decide?

In reassessing these two regency disputes, a vivid portrait emerges of a society governed by one leading principle: he (or she) with the money and power to defend Jerusalem wins the crown. From the bribing of the Haute Cour to Maria’s sale of her claim to the Crown of Jerusalem, this paper explores the various ways that money became power, and power became money in the Latin East.

Session

139
TitleRelics, Pilgrims, and Regional Power in the Later Middle Ages
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAnn Marie Rasmussen, Department of Germanic & Slavic Studies, University of Waterloo, Ontario
 
Paper 139-a Routes, Reliquaries, and 'Recuerdos': St James in Spain and the British Isles in Early Modern Europe
(Language: English)
Sharenda Holland Barlar, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Wheaton College, Illinois
Paper 139-b Spirituality in the Portuguese 14th Century: Royal Veneration, Relic Cults, and War Remains
(Language: English)
Catarina Madureira Villamariz, Vidro e Cerâmica para as Artes (VICARTE), Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Historically, the 9th century was important to Spain because it was in the midst of the Reconquista, a bitter long-standing war between Moors and Christians. With the marriage of Fernando of Aragón and Isabela of Castilla y León in the late 15th century, Spain rose to be a super power both in religion and politics. England, seeking to increase its own world power, proposed marriage between Arthur and Catherine of Aragon, the daughter of Fernando and Isabela. The marriage between Arthur and Catherine (and then Catherine and Henry) deepened connections to Spain and reinforced the importance of the Camino. In addition, pilgrim badges from Santiago de Compostela have been found along the Thames River and throughout the British Isles. This paper will discuss the routes in the British Isles as well as the material culture of the Camino found in the UK and Ireland.

Paper -b:
The connection between body and spirit materializes in Portugal in the remarkable transformation of Lisbon's cathedral in the royal pantheon of King Afonso IV, associated with the cult of relics, the triumph in the Battle of Salado and royal worship. The presence in the Cathedral of St Vincent's relics, the martyr protector of the city, enhance the spiritual connection between the crown and the cult of a saint, visible in the tumulation ad sanctos. Likewise, the placing over the king's sarcophagus, of the remains of the battle, underline the image of mythical spirituality that the king intended for himself.

Session

1002
TitleSelves, Others, Strangers: Reading Identities in Old English Poetry
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairKatherine Miller, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1002-a Confronting the Other in the Old English Exodus
(Language: English)
Karin E. Olsen, Afdeling Engelse Taal en Cultuur, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Paper 1002-b Femininity and Spiritual Manhood in Cynewulf's Juliana
(Language: English)
Jacek Olesiejko, Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań
 
AbstractPaper -a:
A major feature in the Old English poem Exodus and its biblical source is the antagonism between the Israelites and the Egyptians. The Israelites face foes whose inter-cultural alterity threatens the very existence of the Jewish community until this threat is neutralized with the drowning of the Egyptians in the Red Sea. However, the Anglo-Saxon poem can hardly be regarded as a close rendering of the Old Testament narrative. I will argue that the Anglo-Saxon poet did not only take creative liberties in the portrayal of the conflict and its participants, but that he also introduced both culture-specific and radical concepts of Otherness, which ultimately define the identities of the Israelites and their persecutors.

Paper -b:
In Cynewulf's Juliana, Juliana's suitor Heliseus, called 'the guardian of treasure', represents secular material culture, in which women are weakened by the male control of materiality. The material culture of the heroic world reproduces the masculine body politic, reducing women to objects of exchange in contractual relationships between men. The present paper makes a case that from the poem emerges a contrast between a perception of materially constituted masculinity, aligning manhood with wealth and status, and a more inclusive spiritual manhood, available to both sexes. Juliana achieves spiritual manhood as a miles Christi. Feminine holiness empowers women; Juliana's emasculation of the devil is a challenge to the secular patriarchal order in which they are the currency of exchange.

Session

1014
TitleSocial Organisation of War
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairMartin Neuding Skoog, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms Universitet / Swedish Defence University, Stockholm
 
Paper 1014-a Between the Western Finis Terrae and the Holy Land: Perplexities in the Study of the Military Orders in Portugal
(Language: English)
Nuno Villamariz Oliveira, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Paper 1014-b Juan I of Trastámara and the Military Order of Santiago: Power Relationships in the Ancient Kingdom of Castile, 1379-1390
(Language: English)
Milagros Plaza Pedroche, Departamento de Historia, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The 12th century was marked by the creation of military orders of international scope and national context, absolute innovations in the monastic spirituality of medieval Christianity. In the Portuguese case, the Temple and Hospital militias, through an anthropological exegesis of their architecture, defensive systems, territorial organization, and toponymy, underline in different ways the memory of the Holy Land and its tumultuous history, distant but always present. Such issues, little discussed by historiography, pose nowadays several problems of interpretation, opening new readings in the understanding of the Peninsular West.

Paper -b:
This paper aims to focus on power relationships between the Military Order of Santiago and the Castilian Crown during the reign of Juan I (second king of the Trastámara dynasty). Our research has a particular objective: to explore the policies implemented by the monarchy to control the Military Order of Santiago and the appointment of their masters between 1379 and 1390. During his reign, Juan I considered the Military Orders, in a general way, and Santiago, in particular, as key elements in the political authoritarianism of the Castilian Crown.

Session

103
TitleSpolia: Real and Imagined
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairKatherine Anna New, Faculty of Medieval & Modern Languages, University of Oxford
 
Paper 103-a Spolia in Fortifications: Cases of Ancyra and Nicaea
(Language: English)
Mercan Yavuzatmaca, Department of Architecture, Middle East Technical University, Ankara
Paper 103-b Spolia from Murano Island (Venice): A Case Study
(Language: English)
Tadeusz Baranowski, Institute of Archaeology & Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsazwa
Robert Żukowski, Institute of Archaeology & Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsazwa
 
AbstractPaper -a:
This paper aims to investigate the use of spolia as a building material in the Late Antique and Byzantine fortifications of Anatolia through the selected case studies of Ancyra/Ankara and Nicaea/Iznik. The major modification to the walls of Iznik, originally built in the 3rd century, is attributed to Michael III, or precisely to the year 858 by the inscriptions. The 8th and 9th-century phases of the walls of Iznik are characterized by rich quantities of spolia alternating with bands of brick. Similarly, the rebuilding of the inner circuit of the Ankara fortifications, built of large blocks of spolia and alternating courses of brick and rubble stone, is attributed to the year 859.

Paper -b:
In Italy the reuse of spolia from the ancient monuments was very common. In Venice it is particularly difficult to distinguish whether the discovered stones are spolia or the original remains in their original place. The 'floating' islands 'barene' have been enhanced with rubble from the Roman cities on land used as material stabilizing the substrate. On the island of Murano there are many examples of the secondary use of ancient or early medieval architectonic decorative elements. During the Polish-Italian excavations (1983-1986) on this island, on the square in front of the facade of the Basilica of Santa Maria e Donato, discovered were the remains of an early medieval baptistery. Among the remains from the 11th/12th century was one of the column bases topped with a reused and beautifully decorated piece of stone deriving from an early Christian pluteum.

Session

318
TitleThe Materiality of Growing Up in Medieval Society
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorCentre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham
 
OrganiserMiriam Müller, Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham
 
Moderator/ChairMichael Evans, Faculty of Social Science, Delta College, Michigan
 
Paper 318-a The Bioarchaeology of Children: Rural Life
(Language: English)
Mary Elizabeth Lewis, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Paper 318-b Material Culture of Children and Adolescents in the English Village
(Language: English)
Miriam Müller, Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham
 
AbstractFollowing growing interest in the History of Childhood and childhood studies, this sessions aims to engage with this year's theme of 'Materiality' and bring together researchers working on the materiality of medieval childhood. One paper will look at primarily archaeological evidence in the form of grave goods, one will examine the bioarchaeology of childhood and a third will examine ways into material culture of village children through documentary and archaeological sources. The aim is therefore an interdisciplinary examination of the material experience of growing up in medieval society.

Session

1211
TitleTombs and Epitaphs in Medieval Literature
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairEmma Campbell, Department of French Studies, University of Warwick
 
Paper 1211-a Stone Graves, Water Graves: Honour and Spirituality, Materiality and Immateriality in the Narrations of King Arthur and Renart the Fox's Deaths
(Language: English)
Lisa Sancho, UFR Lettres et Philosophie, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté
Paper 1211-b Medieval Welsh Poetry as Evidence for the Material Culture of Death and Commemoration
(Language: English)
Madeleine Gray, School of Humanities & Social Sciences, University of South Wales
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Revolving partly around the question of the representation of the grave, the cases of King Arthur's death and Renart the Fox's false deaths are caught in a tension between stone and water, truth and lies. Through this dynamic, these narrations involve fundamental themes such as honour and spirituality, but with diametrically opposed intentions. This paper aims to show how medieval representations of death, by oscillating between materiality and immateriality, give a hold to an ambiguous use of honour and spirituality, ranging from the celebration of the epic ideal and religious beliefs to the satirical degradation of chivalric and spiritual values.

Paper -b:
Medieval historians have traditionally regarded the tomb carvings of medieval Wales as the poor cousins of the tradition in England and mainland Europe. However, as long ago as 2003, Howard Williams reminded us that the materiality of death and commemoration was much wider in scope than the study of tomb carvings. Recent work on the remarkable tradition of commemorative poetry in later medieval Wales provides valuable evidence for the material aspects of burial rituals as well as challenging some received ideas about monumentality.

Session

1647
TitleTranslating the Bible, Reading, and Salvation, II: The Austrian Translator of the Bible and His Oeuvre - From the Manuscript into the World Wide Web
Date/TimeThursday 4 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorProject 'The Austrian Bible Translator - The Word of God in German' ('Österreichischer Bibelübersetzter - Gottes Wort deutsch'), Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften (BAdW) / Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften (BBAW)
 
OrganiserAngila Vetter, Forschungsprojekt 'Der Österreichische Bibelübersetzer', Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften (BAdW), Universität Augsburg
 
Moderator/ChairAstrid Breith, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Paper 1647-a Paths to the Future of the Critical Edition: The Works of the Austrian Bible Translator in the World Wide Web
(Language: English)
Angila Vetter, Forschungsprojekt 'Der Österreichische Bibelübersetzer', Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften (BAdW), Universität Augsburg
Paper 1647-b The Two Editions of the Gospelworks of the Austrian Bible Translator: Text Structure and Layout Strategies in Selected Manuscripts of the Gospelworks
(Language: English)
Sebastian Holtzhauer, Forschungsprojekt 'Der Österreichische Bibelübersetzer', Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften (BAdW), Universität Augsburg
 
AbstractThe first half of the 14th century was a time of deep spiritual disturbance and concern within central Europe. The three sessions 'Translating the Bible' will explore various impacts of this discomposure that found its expression in new approaches to the Holy Scripture. One session will focus on the oeuvre of the Austrian Translator of the Bible, an anonymous layman in today's Austria, who translated large parts of the Bible into the vernacular in order to secure correct understanding for lay readers. His widely unedited work represents maybe the central stage of the German Bible before Luther. This oeuvre is now in the center of the interacademic long-term project 'The Austrian Bible Translator - The Word of God in German', which will provide an hybrid edition. Another session explores translations of the Passion and possibilities of guiding the audience via explanations and illuminations. The third session will concentrate on the materiality of the sources and introduce methods of research such as analysis of watermarks, research databases, and tools to trace back provenances.

Session

1235
TitleWhat Is the Matter of/with Medieval Philosophy?, III: The Matter of the Mind and Soul
Date/TimeWednesday 3 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorCentre for Ancient & Medieval Philosophy, Durham University
 
OrganiserSara L. Uckelman, Durham Centre for Ancient & Medieval Philosophy, Durham University
 
Moderator/ChairSara L. Uckelman, Durham Centre for Ancient & Medieval Philosophy, Durham University
 
Paper 1235-a Ouch!: On Pain and Its Intentional Character in Robert Kilwardby
(Language: English)
Elena Baltuta, Facultatea de Istorie și Filosofie, Universitatea Babeş-Bolyai, Cluj-Napoca
 
AbstractThis is the third of four panels on 'What Is the Matter of/with Medieval Philosophy?', bringing together papers addressing the subject matter of medieval philosophy, including how subfields of philosophy were demarcated; how philosophy was separated from other disciplines; how medieval philosophy is separated from (and continuous with) ancient and early modern philosophy. This panel on philosophy of mind (including the soul) brings together three papers on (1) the nature of the soul and its experience of pain; (2) the role of reason in personal responsibility; (3) the faculties of the soul.

Session

635
TitleWriting Sermons in the Late Middle Ages
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJonathan Adams, Institutionen för nordiska språk, Uppsala Universitet
 
Paper 635-a A Sermon Collection of the Dominican Friar Marco di Pietro Succhielli
(Language: English)
Yoko Kimura, Faculty of Education, Shinshu University
Paper 635-b Saint Stephen’s Farsed Epistles as Catechetical Message
(Language: English)
Joan Maria Martí Mendoza, Institut de Ciències de l'Educació, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The unpublished sermon collection of Succhielli (spanning from 1481 to 1512) shows how a less known Dominican preacher prepared his sermons in Savonarolan Florence. The collection under scrutiny contains a variety of sermons, from intellectual sermons with many citations from auctoritates such as Greek philosophers, Roman poets, and Renaissance humanists, to simpler sermons with popular, vivid exempla. This paper reveals how Succhielli collected his materials, from where he copied them and which books he had on his desk. As a result, we can see Florentine Dominican preaching with a viewpoint different from that of a 'charismatic' preacher like Savonarola.

Paper -b:
If we think a sermon as a material who indicates and shows the correct attitude of life to get the eternal live in Heaven, we also can find it in other liturgical parts as the epistles. One of the most interesting examples is the Saint Stephen’s farsed epistle, both in Latin and in romance languages.

In my paper I will expose how the Saint Stephen’s farsed epistles have a catechetical message. In their texts we can find a lot of references and samples of the correct way to live: the defense of the Christian message, a model death in Christ, the forgiveness of those who give us pain and sorrows are reinforced with farses and tropes to the original Luke’s Acts text both in Latin and, especially, in romance languages: French, Occitan and Catalan from 12th century to 15th.