Session609
TitleNetwork Analysis for Medievalists, II: New Approaches to Medieval Texts
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorSocial Network Analysis Researchers of the Middle Ages (SNARMA)
 
OrganiserMatthew H. Hammond, Department of History, King's College London
 
Moderator/ChairMatthew H. Hammond, Department of History, King's College London
 
Paper 609-a What Can Social Network Analysis Reveal about the 13th-Century Cartulary from Saint-Amand, Rouen?
(Language: English)
Charlotte Cartwright, Department of History, Christopher Newport University, Virginia
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Ecclesiastical History; Religious Life
Paper 609-b Making Connections in the Viking Diaspora: What Might Social Network Analysis Reveal about the People of Orkneyinga Saga?
(Language: English)
Tom Fairfax, School of English / Centre for the Study of the Viking Age, University of Nottingham
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 609-c Network Analysis under Collation of Textual Content: The Epistle Lectionary in the Context of the Slavonic Manuscript Tradition, 11th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Aneta Yotova, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster 'Understanding Written Artefacts', Universität Hamburg
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Language and Literature - Slavic; Religious Life
 
AbstractThe techniques and the conceptual framework of network analysis have recently found their way into historical scholarship. Several important endeavours, such as the establishment of the Journal of Historical Network Research, testify to the growing interest of historians in network analysis and more generally in structured relational data. This panel, part of a series recurring annually at the IMC, aims at gathering some of the otherwise rather dispersed papers building on network analysis, applying this methodology to medieval material, bringing palpable results of interest to scholars from the respective fields of expertise, and promoting comparison and debate. This session focuses on bringing network methods to bear on medieval texts.