Session330
TitleIdeology of Translation, III: Translation and the Cultural Dynamics
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2013: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorInstitut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / ERC-Starting Grant OVERMODE / Austrian Science Fund FWF, Project P 23912-G19
 
OrganiserAndrea M. Cuomo, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Christian Gastgeber, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Pavlína Rychterová, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Moderator/ChairSabrina Corbellini, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
Paper 330-a The Use of Latin as Vernacular Language: Reading Dante Alighieri at the Council of Constance
(Language: English)
Andrea Robiglio, De Wulf-Mansion Centre for Ancient, Medieval & Renaissance Philosophy, KU Leuven
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Language and Literature - Italian; Mentalities
Paper 330-b The Latin Methodology Translated into Greek: The Case of Maximus Planudes
(Language: English)
Andrea M. Cuomo, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index Terms: Byzantine Studies; Language and Literature - Comparative; Language and Literature - Greek; Mentalities
Paper 330-c Giles of Rome's De regimine principum: From Latin to French, and from French to Tuscan - Translating the Past: The Historiography at the Court of Charles IV (1346-1378) between Latin and Vernaculars
(Language: English)
Gianluca Briguglia, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
Václav Žůrek, Centre for Medieval Studies, Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Comparative; Mentalities
 
AbstractMedieval literature presents a great deal of translations which cannot be exclusively assigned to politically or theologically motivated translations. Regarding these aspects from a sociolinguistic point of view the question arises which topics are so uniform that another culture can adopt it in its language or where has a translator to change it to his culture, a phenomenon which may be defined as (unconscious) cultural censorship. If a translated text is accepted, the sociolinguistic research can trace the social factors of its influence and audience. The topic itself is not convincing enough that a text was translated with a special interest and that this translation is accepted in the surroundings of a new society; the society must also be 'disposed' to accept this text (if successful). There are texts which only a very small audience group were interested in (and thus made or arranged a translation), socially they had no further influence. On the other side some translations (as the works of Aristotle) broadened the horizon of a society and were warmly welcome, texts which in former times had no or not this great success of influence. In this sense translations mirror also the social development and attention to special topics and its 'need' of texts from other cultures/societies. The acceptance or refusal of such translated texts reflects in consequence a closer or more remote feeling towards the other society.