Session119
TitleRevival and Renewal: New Uses for Old Stories and Patterns in the 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries
Date/TimeMonday 6 July 2015: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorCentre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands & Islands
 
OrganiserVictoria Whitworth, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
 
Moderator/ChairFarah Mendlesohn, Department of English & Media, Anglia Ruskin University
 
Paper 119-a 'It is not in my book of the Morte d'Arthur': Florence Converse's Sir Launcelot
(Language: English)
Paul Hardwick, Department of English, Leeds Trinity University
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Other; Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 119-b Arthur on the Cheap: Street Literature and the 19th-Century Arthurian Revival
(Language: English)
Kate Lister, Department of English, Leeds Trinity University
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Other; Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 119-c Death, Memory, and George Bain's Commemorative Renewing of the Book of Kells
(Language: English)
Victoria Whitworth, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
Index Terms: Art History - Decorative Arts; Art History - Sculpture; Medievalism and Antiquarianism
 
AbstractThese three papers address visual and narrative revivals and renewals of medieval themes in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, focussing on their reinvention for a mass audience and the motives of the writers and craftspeople responsible. Chapbooks reframed Arthurian narratives in rich ways for a much wider audience; Florence Converse rewrote Malory for a Sunday School readership, articulating political discontents; and the pioneering Celtic revival artist George Bain combined contemporary aesthetics with Insular art to articulate his philosophy of reinvention and renewal.