Session1611
TitleStylus as a Paint Brush: Writing and Artistic Creation, 6th-9th Centuries, II
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
Sponsor'ICONOPHILIA': Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship 657240 / Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research & Innovation (2014-2020)
 
OrganiserVincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM - UMR 7302), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Francesca Dell'Acqua, Dipartimento di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale (DISPAC), Università degli Studi di Salerno
 
Moderator/ChairFrancesca Dell'Acqua, Dipartimento di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale (DISPAC), Università degli Studi di Salerno
 
Paper 1611-a Sans l'ombre d'un doute: renifler la Maiestas Domini
(Language: Français)
Eric Palazzo, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers
Index Terms: Art History - General; Language and Literature - Latin; Liturgy; Theology
Paper 1611-b Descriptions and Evocations of the Cross in Alcuinus's tituli
(Language: English)
Vincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM - UMR 7302), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index Terms: Art History - General; Epigraphy; Language and Literature - Latin; Rhetoric
 
AbstractThe two sessions will explore: 1) the ability of late antique and medieval authors to create images throughout their written words, blurring the borders between visual and literary arts; 2) investigate how the written and oral dissemination of textual imagery interacted with the conception, production, and perception of visual arts in the same period. Using their stylus as a painting brush, late antique and medieval authors transformed words in literary images/icons, making them part of a wider visual culture. Works of art described or evoked might have existed, but, most of the time, textual imagery remained 'literary works of art' in a poetic space of creation, a fiction of shapes and colors, depicted or shaped under the readers' eyes.