Session312
TitleNetwork Analysis for Medieval Studies, III: Networks of Manuscripts, Authors, and Authorities
Date/TimeMonday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorDepartment for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
 
OrganiserDavid Zbíral, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
 
Moderator/ChairJohannes Preiser-Kapeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Paper 312-a Glosses to the First Book of the Etymologies as a Case Study in Early Medieval Intellectual Networks
(Language: English)
Evina Steinová, Huygens Instituut voor Nederlandse Geschiedenis, Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen (ING - KNAW), Amsterdam
Index Terms: Archives and Sources; Computing in Medieval Studies; Language and Literature - Latin; Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 312-b Networks in the Czech Reformation: The Case of the Lay Chalice
(Language: English)
Petra Mutlová, Department of Classical Studies, Masaryk University, Brno
Index Terms: Archives and Sources; Computing in Medieval Studies; Language and Literature - Latin; Theology
Paper 312-c Metadata for the Middle Ages: A Network Analysis of Manuscriptorium.com
(Language: English)
Zdenko Vozár, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Index Terms: Archives and Sources; Computing in Medieval Studies; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractThe techniques and the conceptual framework of network analysis have recently found their way into historical scholarship. Several important endeavours, such as the establishment of the Journal of Historical Network Research, testify to the growing interest of historians in network analysis and more generally in structured relational data. This panel, intended as the inception of a series recurring annually at the IMC, aims at gathering some of the otherwise rather dispersed papers building on network analysis, applying this methodology to medieval material, bringing palpable results of interest to scholars from the respective fields of expertise, and promoting comparison and debate. This year's sessions pay special attention to processes of governance accessed through networks extracted from diplomatic sources, and to medieval learning and intertextuality accessed through networks of manuscripts, authors, and citations.