Session1302
TitleMedieval Monuments as Technologies of Remembrance, II
Date/TimeWednesday 14 July 2010: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorDepartment of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
 
OrganiserMeggen Gondek, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
Howard Williams, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
 
Moderator/ChairDavid Petts, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
 
Paper 1302-a Revealing the Stories in Pictish Stones: Carving Ritual, Memories, Actions, and Materials
(Language: English)
Meggen Gondek, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Archaeology - Sites; Art History - Sculpture
Paper 1302-b Subterranean Memories: Rock-Cutting Ethiopian Churches as Commemorative Practice
(Language: English)
Niall Finneran, Department of Archaeology, University of Winchester
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Archaeology - Sites; Architecture - Religious
Paper 1302-c Commemorative Technologies and Transformations in Anglo-Saxon Architecture
(Language: English)
Howard Williams, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Archaeology - Sites
 
AbstractMedieval monuments have been explored in detail from numerous perspectives including their style, form, function, iconography, and socio-political context. The session addresses a theme that has previously received limited detailed consideration for medieval monuments but has been recently discussed by scholars of prehistoric and early historic mortuary practices. Regarding monuments as 'technologies of remembrance' – a term originally employed by the prehistorian Andy Jones - papers explore the commemorative strategies inherent in the sequences of practical and ritualised action that took place during monument-building, monument-use, as well as monument adaptation and reuse. Based on new archaeological evidence, the papers approach medieval memories and identities as constituted through these sequences of embodied engagements with materiality and place. In doing so, the papers offer case studies and new perspectives in the study of monumentality in the Middle Ages from the 5th to the 15th centuries.