Session1326
TitleOn the Fringes of the Law: Three Examples of the Spanish Middle Ages - Kings, Bishops, and Nobles
Date/TimeWednesday 11 July 2012: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorUniversidad de Oviedo / Instituto de Estudios Medievales, Universidad de León
 
OrganiserFrancisco Javier Álvarez Carbajal, Área de Ciencias y Técnicas Historiográficas, Universidad de Oviedo
 
Moderator/ChairNéstor Vigil Montes, Departamento de Prehistoria, Arqueología, Historia Antigua, Historia Medieval y Ciencias y Técnicas Historiográficas, Universidad de Murcia
 
Paper 1326-a An 11th-Century King and His Way to Legitimize His Power: Fernando I of León
(Language: English)
Noemi Álvarez da Silva, Department of Documental & Artistic Heritage, Universidad de León
Index Terms: Art History - Decorative Arts; Historiography - Medieval; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1326-b Clergy and Breach of Law: The Dioceses of Salamanca and Zamora during the 12th and 13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Esperanza de los Reyes Aguilar, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de León
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Art History - General; Ecclesiastical History; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1326-c Rule Infringements: Enquiries in the County of Luna at the End of the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Francisco Javier Álvarez Carbajal, Área de Ciencias y Técnicas Historiográficas, Universidad de Oviedo
Index Terms: Charters and Diplomatics; Local History; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractDuring the Middle Ages the highest social classes decided the rules that every subject, congregation or vassal should obey. Although the wealthy were not usually exempt from obeying them, they developed political, religious, and social strategies in order to keep themselves on the fringes of the law or to ensure that it was upheld as well. Document alteration, patronage of the arts and enquiries were some of the means used by kings, ecclesiastics and lords to legitimize their power. A varied outlook of these kinds of activities could be found in the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages, as they were carried out by monarchs like Fernando I in León during the 11th century, by the clergymen of Zamora and Salamanca during the 12th and 13th centuries, or finally, by the count of Luna during the 15th century.