Session204
TitleRules for Early Medieval Grave Goods?: Implications for the World of the Living from the World of the Dead
Date/TimeMonday 9 July 2012: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorInstitut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg
 
OrganiserMarion Sorg, Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
 
Moderator/ChairRoland Steinacher, Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altorientalistik, Universität Innsbruck
 
Paper 204-a Are Brooches Personal Possessions of the Deceased?: An Empiric Investigation Based on Analyzing Age-Relatedness of Brooches
(Language: English)
Marion Sorg, Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index Terms: Archaeology - Artefacts; Archaeology - General; Mentalities
Paper 204-b Invisible Rules: The Study of Grave Goods in the Context of Privately Organized Intergenerational Transmission in Families
(Language: English)
Mirjam Kars, Faculty of Archaeology, Universiteit Leiden
Index Terms: Archaeology - Artefacts; Daily Life; Law
Paper 204-c Things to Be Taken from the Dead: A Case Study on Reopened Graves
(Language: English)
Stephanie Zintl, Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Archaeology - Sites; Mentalities
 
AbstractWere Merovingian grave goods personal possessions of the deceased or were they family property? According to which rules were they put into graves and removed from them? These questions will be discussed in the session, as well as the consequences different theories on that topic have on chronology. Furthermore, a detailed empiric view on personal possession is developed by examining if there are correlations between wear marks on brooches and the age-at-death of the women buried with them. A case study on reopened graves at a regional level will explore possible rules and reasons for retrieving things from graves.