Session703
TitleOrigin, Usage, and Functionality of the Frankish leges
Date/TimeTuesday 2 July 2013: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorSonderforschungsbereich 700 'Governance in Räumen begrenzter Staatlichkeit', Freie Universität Berlin
 
OrganiserLukas Bothe, Sonderforschungsbereich 700 'Governance in Areas of Limited Statehood', Freie Universität Berlin
 
Moderator/ChairStefan Esders, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
 
Paper 703-a Isidorus Hispalensis and the Lex Salica
(Language: English)
Magali Coumert, Département d'histoire, Université de Bretagne Occidentale / Institut Universitaire de France, Paris
Index Terms: Law; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 703-b Let 'Em Pay or Hang 'Em High?: Tackling Theft and Robbery in Merovingian Legal Sources
(Language: English)
Lukas Bothe, Sonderforschungsbereich 700 'Governance in Areas of Limited Statehood', Freie Universität Berlin
Index Terms: Administration; Law; Social History
Paper 703-c Traces of the Frankish King in the Lex Baiuvariorum
(Language: English)
Stephan Ridder, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index Terms: Administration; Law; Military History
 
AbstractThis session explores the wide range of present studies in Frankish legal history. It presents different ways of addressing sources which appear rather dull at first glance. Looking at manuscript tradition Magalie Coumert finds a pattern of Isidorus Hispalensis excerpts regularly copied with the Lex Salica which may be telling of the idea and teaching of justice among Carolingian elites. Lukas Bothe asks for the functionality of Frankish law by analysing varying approaches to theft and robbery in Merovingian legal sources. Picking up on another prologue which states royal authorship for the laws, Stephan Ridder is looking at royal authority tangible in the frontier law of the Lex Baiuvariorum.