Session1111
TitleThe Clergy in Western Europe, 700-1200, II: Rules, Communities, and Regional Differences
Date/TimeWednesday 9 July 2014: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserJulia Steuart Barrow, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds / Northern History
 
Moderator/ChairJulia Steuart Barrow, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds / Northern History
 
Paper 1111-a Re-Interpreting the Influence of Chrodegang of Metz: What Can Bern Burgerbibliothek, MS AA.90.11 Tell Us about the Life of the Canonical Clergy in the Carolingian World?
(Language: English)
Stephen Michael Ling, School of History, University of Leicester
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Liturgy; Religious Life
Paper 1111-b Monks and Secular Clerics in the Aftermath of the 10th-Century Benedictine Reform
(Language: English)
Francesca Tinti, Departamento de Filología e Historia, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Vitoria-Gasteiz
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Monasticism; Religious Life
Paper 1111-c Priests and Regional Variation in Late Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Gerald P. Dyson, Department of History, Kentucky Christian University
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Local History; Religious Life
 
AbstractLiving and worshipping as a community was a normal part of clerical life in the middle ages, especially the pre-1100 period; clergy in communities were called canons. This session opens with an examination of a little-known Carolingian rule for canons, the so-called Bern Rule. Next it considers the extent to which monks and canons could be distiguished in 10th-century England following the Benedictine Reform of the 10th century, paying particular attention to the hybrid community of Worcester Cathedral. Finally it surveys regional differences between clerical communities in late Anglo-Saxon England, paying attention to the different extents of continental and insular traditions.