Session119
TitleBuilding an Empire: Theory and Practice under the Mamluk Sultanate, 1250-1517, I
Date/TimeMonday 7 July 2014: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorHenri Pirenne Institute for Medieval Studies / ERC-Starting Grant Project, 2009-14: 'The Mamlukisation of the Mamluk Sultanate', Universiteit Gent
 
OrganiserKristof D'Hulster, Vakgroep Talen en Culturen: Het Nabije Oosten en de Islamwereld, Universiteit Gent
 
Moderator/ChairJo van Steenbergen, Henri Pirenne Institute for Medieval Studies / Department of Languages & Cultures - Near East & Islamic World, Universiteit Gent
 
Paper 119-a Mapping the Mamluk Sultanate: From Cartographic Borders to Socio-Spatial Networks
(Language: English)
Kristof D'Hulster, Vakgroep Talen en Culturen: Het Nabije Oosten en de Islamwereld, Universiteit Gent
Index Terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies; Political Thought
Paper 119-b Street Credibility: The Articulation of Universal Authority in the Mamluk Urban Space, c. 1260-1360
(Language: English)
Willem Flinterman, Instituut voor Cultuur en Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam / Instituut voor Geschiedenis, Universiteit Leiden
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Epigraphy; Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 119-c The Early Mamluk Empire in Light of Historical Sociology and Comparative Politics
(Language: English)
Reuven Amitai, Institute for Asian & African Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index Terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies; Politics and Diplomacy
 
AbstractFor more than 250 years, the Mamluk sultanate ruled over Egypt and Syria, extending its influence as far as the Hijaz and Anatolia. Despite their servile origins, the Mamluks were able to raise themselves to the highest rank of the Islamic hierarchy, by becoming the Saviors and Protectors of the Muslim Community, and thus, heirs to the Abbasid Caliphate. Yet, these inherited claims of universality needed to be reconciled both with the claimants's background, and with the changed world in which they found themselves. This session seeks to explore the usefulness of 'empire' as an explanatory concept for the Mamluk phenomenon.