Session219
TitleBuilding an Empire: Theory and Practice under the Mamluk Sultanate, 1250-1517, II
Date/TimeMonday 7 July 2014: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorHenri Pirenne Institute for Medieval Studies / ERC-Starting Grant Project, 2009-14: 'The Mamlukisation of the Mamluk Sultanate', Universiteit Gent
 
OrganiserMalika Dekkiche, Vakgroep Talen en Culturen: Het Nabije Oosten en de Islamwereld, Universiteit Gent
 
Moderator/ChairKristof D'Hulster, Vakgroep Talen en Culturen: Het Nabije Oosten en de Islamwereld, Universiteit Gent
 
Paper 219-a Instrumentalising Religion in 15th-Century Mamluk Politics
(Language: English)
Yasser Daoudi, Vakgroep Talen en Culturen: Het Nabije Oosten en de Islamwereld, Universiteit Gent
Index Terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 219-b Towards the Empire: Use and Means of Mamluk 15th-Century Diplomacy
(Language: English)
Malika Dekkiche, Vakgroep Talen en Culturen: Het Nabije Oosten en de Islamwereld, Universiteit Gent
Index Terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 219-c The Flux and Reflux of Mamluk State (Trans-)Formation: Reconsidering Notions of Elite, State, and Empire in Late Medieval Syro-Egypt
(Language: English)
Jo van Steenbergen, Henri Pirenne Institute for Medieval Studies / Department of Languages & Cultures - Near East & Islamic World, Universiteit Gent
 
AbstractFor more than 250 years, the Mamluk Sultanate ruled over Egypt and Syria, extending its influence as far as the Hijaz and Anatolia. Despite their servile origins, the Mamluks were able to raise themselves to the highest rank of the Islamic hierarchy, by becoming the Saviors and Protectors of the Muslim Community, and thus, heirs to the Abbasid Caliphate. Yet, these inherited claims of universality needed to be reconciled both with the claimants's background, and with the changed world in which they found themselves. This session focuses on the Mamluk imperial experience in its historical particularity, by exploring the ways in which these claims were adapted to changing circumstances, translated into new idioms, and communicated in- and externally.