Session1507
TitleLaw and Empire: Editing the Carolingian Capitularies, I
Date/TimeThursday 10 July 2014: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorNordrhein-Westfälische Akademie der Wissenschaften / Monumenta Germaniae Historica / Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa', Universität Hamburg
 
OrganiserKarl Ubl, Historisches Institut, Universität zu Köln
 
Moderator/ChairGerhard Schmitz, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
 
Paper 1507-a Looking for the Coherence and Meaning of a Carolingian Heterogeneous Notebook: A New Examination of Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, MS Lat. 2718
(Language: English)
Philippe Depreux, Historisches Seminar / Exzellenzcluster 'Understanding Written Artefacts', Universität Hamburg
Sarah Gross-Luttermann, Historisches Institut, Universität zu Köln
Index Terms: Law; Literacy and Orality; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1507-b A Law and an Oath: The Constitutio Romana of 824
(Language: English)
Stefan Esders, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index Terms: Law; Literacy and Orality; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1507-c Capitula or Capitulare?: Editing the So-Called Capitulare missorum from 829
(Language: English)
Steffen Patzold, Seminar für mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Index Terms: Law; Literacy and Orality; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractLegislation in the form of capitularies was a hallmark of Frankish kingship since the 6th century. This instrument of royal power was, however, substantially transformed after the imperial coronation of Charlemagne. The period between 800 and 830 is rightly considered as the heyday of capitulary legislation. The first of two sessions, while focusing on the transmission of capitularies in the manuscripts of the 9th century, will discuss the problems related to manufacturing 'authentic texts' of the capitularies.