Session1313
TitleEmpire of Letters, II: The Essence of Script
Date/TimeWednesday 9 July 2014: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorCap Digital / APICES / Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris
 
OrganiserVincent Debiais, Centre de recherches historiques (CRH - UMR 8558), École des hautes études en sciences sociales / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
 
Moderator/ChairDominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
 
Paper 1313-a Carolingian Parallel Scripts: The Silent Rebellion of Scribes
(Language: English)
Cécile Treffort, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Poitiers
Index Terms: Epigraphy; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Mentalities
Paper 1313-b Tamed Tigers?: Charters and the Empires of the Script
(Language: English)
Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index Terms: Charters and Diplomatics; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Mentalities; Politics and Diplomacy
 
AbstractScript is not a neutral communication medium. Scripts were particularly used throughout the Middle Ages to stage the idea of Empire, power, and domination. Well known examples are the litterae caelestes in the late Antiquity, the papal curialis, the litterae elongatae. And the scriptural domain is an Empire in itself with its coherence and history, with its own kingdoms, counties and lordships at war for influence. This session explores the graphical strategies and the use of script for revealing and concealing: revealing the mastery of inscription makers and hiding the message (Treffort), revealing the legitimacy and hiding the differences (Barret), revealing the knowledge and deprecating the art of memory (Virenque). This session will also explore how to analyse connotations and influences in order to correctly interpret artefacts.