Session121
TitleCoining and Sealing Empire in the Middle Ages
Date/TimeMonday 7 July 2014: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserSusan Solway, Department of History of Art & Architecture, De Paul University, Chicago
 
Moderator/ChairSusan Solway, Department of History of Art & Architecture, De Paul University, Chicago
 
Paper 121-a The Face of the Emperor and the Face of the King: Numismatic Evidence from Vandal North Africa and Ostrogothic Italy
(Language: English)
Guido M. Berndt, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index Terms: Art History - General; Historiography - Medieval; Numismatics
Paper 121-b The 'Currency' of Rome: Coining Empire in the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Susan Solway, Department of History of Art & Architecture, De Paul University, Chicago
Index Terms: Art History - Decorative Arts; Art History - General
Paper 121-c The Emperor's New Hair: Imitation and Innovation in Coin Portraits in the Post-Roman West, 5th-9th Centuries
(Language: English)
Florence Codine, Département des Monnaies et Médailles, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris
Index Terms: Mentalities; Numismatics; Political Thought
 
AbstractDuring the Middle Ages, coins and seals served crucial political and ideological purposes beyond their most basic functions, which, for coins, was their use as a commercial means of exchange (i.e., currency), and, for seals, to validate and authenticate documents. The principal official material symbols attesting to the identity and to the legitimacy of those in power, they were uniquely positioned to function as cultural signifiers charged with social, religious, and especially, political meaning. This session investigates ways that coins and seals served as vehicles of meaning and signification, conveying imperial messages, and contributing to the concept of 'empire' in the medieval period.