Session1305
TitleNeglected Sources for the History of the Divine Office
Date/TimeWednesday 9 July 2014: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorUniversity of Toronto
 
OrganiserMadeleine Getz, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
 
Moderator/ChairMargot Fassler, Department of Music / Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
 
Paper 1305-a A 9th-Century Chorbuch (Trier Stadtbibliothek 1245/597) and the Secular Origins of the Monastic Office
(Language: English)
Matthew Mattingly, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto
Index Terms: Liturgy; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Monasticism; Music
Paper 1305-b Chanting the Secular Office in a Rural Anglo-Saxon Church: Another Look at the 11th-Century Marginal Liturgica in the Old English Bede (Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 41)
(Language: English)
Jesse D. Billett, Faculty of Divinity, Trinity College, University of Toronto, Downtown
Index Terms: Liturgy; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Music
Paper 1305-c The Why and Wherefore of Chanting the Divine Office: The Manuale de mysteriis ecclesiae of Peter of Roissy, Canon of Chartres, c. 1200, and Its Sources
(Language: English)
Madeleine Getz, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
Index Terms: Education; Liturgy; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractThis session brings three unedited manuscript sources to bear on the medieval history of the Divine Office (the liturgy of daily prayer), looking particularly at the interplay between monastic and secular traditions. Paper A examines the earliest substantial source of Benedictine Office chant, a 9th-century 'choirbook' in which an earlier secular tradition has been brought into conformity with the liturgical prescriptions of the Rule of St Benedict. Paper B investigates a unique specimen of the Office liturgy of secular clergy in rural Anglo-Saxon England, a tradition that seems to have maintained its integrity and vitality in the face of a powerful Benedictine monastic reform movement. Paper C identifies the secular and monastic roots of an early 13th-century secular canon's commentary on the Divine Office.