Session1234
TitlePassion, Power, and Rhetoric: Latin Influences on Early Drama
Date/TimeWednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorMedieval & Renaissance Drama Society
 
OrganiserElza C. Tiner, Modern & Classical Languages Department, University of Lynchburg, Virginia
 
Moderator/ChairElza C. Tiner, Modern & Classical Languages Department, University of Lynchburg, Virginia
 
Paper 1234-a Latin as a Cultural Identity: A Middle European Case
(Language: English)
Piotr Bering, Institute of Classical Philology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Latin; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Performance Arts - Drama
Paper 1234-b Are the Latin Responsoria of the Jeu d'Adam the Source of the Play?
(Language: English)
Christophe Chaguinian, Department of World Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of North Texas
Index Terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan; Language and Literature - Latin; Liturgy; Performance Arts - Drama
Paper 1234-c Finalkomedie für die Frauen: Language as a Signal Symbol of Exclusivity and Inclusivity in Early Catholic College Theatre
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Dyer, Griffith Center for the Arts, Our Lady of the Lake University, Texas
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Latin; Language and Literature - Other; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Performance Arts - Drama
 
AbstractThe papers in this session explore the expansion and shifting boundaries of Latin and vernacular languages in early drama. The presenters demonstrate how Latin texts served as direct and indirect sources for plays in vernacular languages. Moreover, the Latin language was used as a marker of social status, to include and exclude audiences. In performance, the Latin language was wielded as a symbol of identity, authority, status, and intellectual innovation.