Session1731
TitleEcclesiastical Literary and Visual Culture in Medieval England
Date/TimeThursday 6 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorJournal of Medieval Monastic Studies, Brepols
 
OrganiserKaren Stöber, Departament d'Història, Universitat de Lleida
 
Moderator/ChairJanet Burton, Faculty of Humanities & Performing Arts, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter
 
Paper 1731-a 'No shape at all'?: Analysing the Literary Scope of Medieval Chronicles and Annals
(Language: English)
Harriett Webster, Institute of Humanities, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Literacy and Orality; Monasticism; Religious Life
Paper 1731-b Sergys and Singing Cakes: The Elevation of the Host and Its Visual Setting in Medieval England
(Language: English)
Allan Barton, St David's University Chapel, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Art History - General; Religious Life; Sermons and Preaching
Paper 1731-c Abbots and Aristocrats: Patronage at Hailes Abbey at the End of the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Michael Carter, Curatorial Department, English Heritage, London
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Art History - General; Monasticism; Religious Life
 
AbstractThe three papers in this session look at ecclesiastical culture in medieval England from three different angles. The first paper will use the Chronicon Anglicanum of Coggeshall Abbey and the 'Dunstable Annals' as a starting point to examine the literary devices utilised by annalists and chroniclers, exposing the layered identities of English monastic houses in the Middle Ages. Paper -b will look the at key medieval ceremonial development within the Mass, the elevation of the host, focusing on the way this ceremonial action related to and also shaped the visual and aesthetic landscape of the medieval church. And paper -c will explore the identity and motives of patrons at Hailes Abbey in the century before its suppression, with an especial focus on the insights this patronage affords into the religious life of the monastery.