Session731
TitleIberian Monasticism, I: Late Antiquity
Date/TimeTuesday 4 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorNetwork for the Study of Late Antique & Early Medieval Monasticism / Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
 
OrganiserJorge López Quiroga, Departamento de Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Artemio Manuel Martínez Tejera, Centro de Estudios de Posgrado, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
 
Moderator/ChairArtemio Manuel Martínez Tejera, Centro de Estudios de Posgrado, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
 
Paper 731-a Late Antique Monasticism in Gallaecia: Textual Evidence and Material Invisibility
(Language: English)
Jorge López Quiroga, Departamento de Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Monasticism; Religious Life; Social History
Paper 731-b El monacato de las Islas Baleares y del sudeste de la Península Ibérica entre los siglos IV-VII d. C.
(Language: Español)
Mateu Riera Rullan, Història de l'Església, Arqueologia i Arts cristianes, Facultat Antoni Gaudí, Ateneu Universitari Sant Pacià, Barcelona
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Monasticism; Religious Life; Social History
Paper 731-c Oriental Otherness: Syrian Monks in Visigothic Hispania
(Language: English)
Jordina Sales-Carbonell, Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals (IRCVM), Universitat de Barcelona
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Monasticism; Religious Life; Social History
 
AbstractFor the Iberian Peninsula we have important written evidence of the existence of monks and forms of monasticism in Late Antiquity. These texts indicate the presence of hermits and also monastic communities living under monastic rules, such as Fructuoso de Braga and Isidore of Seville. Although we have some rare and problematic material evidence about the hermit phenomenon, with respect to monastic communities our knowledge is almost non-existent. We ignore, largely, how it would be in a late antique Iberian monastery. We know, obviously, religious buildings that are interpreted hypothetically as monasteries; we have, also, material evidence of buildings or structures that might have been part of these monastic complexes… However, we cannot present a coherent picture of the organisation and structure of the late-antique Iberian monastic space. In this 1st session, and through regional analysis, we will try to address these indefiniteness problems and how we can appropriately interrelate textual information with archaeological research.