Session1018
TitleExceptionally Healthy?: Exploring Disease, Disfigurement, and Disability as the Norm in Medieval Culture
Date/TimeWednesday 5 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorCentre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Wellcome 'Effaced' Project, Swansea University
 
OrganiserPatricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Moderator/ChairElma Brenner, Wellcome Collection, London
 
Paper 1018-a Epilepsy and Otherness: The Prophet and His Detractors
(Language: English)
Hillary Burgardt, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology, Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Rhetoric; Sermons and Preaching; Social History
Paper 1018-b 'Normality' and the 'Other' at the End of the World: Sickness and Disability in the Passio Olavi
(Language: English)
Karl Christian Alvestad, Institutt for kultur, religion og samfunnsfag, Universitetet i Sørøst-Norge, Notodden
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Paper 1018-c Looking Strange: A Positive Asset?
(Language: English)
Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
 
AbstractEngaging with the problematic category 'others', this sessions takes as its starting point the sheer ubiquity of sick, disfigured and disabled persons in medieval narrative and legal texts, and ask whether it is tenable to propose good health as a 'normal' human state between 500 and 1500CE. The panellists take a queer view that challenges the paradigmatic position of those who were sick, disfigured or incapacitated as excluded or 'on the margins', and instead illustrates the necessity of inclusion of these groups in discourses of power and piety.