Session1133
TitleCanon Law, II: 'We Read Nothing in the Canons' - Canonists and the Roman Law
Date/TimeWednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorIuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio (ICMAC)
 
OrganiserBruce C. Brasington, Department of History, West Texas A&M University, Canyon
Danica Summerlin, Department of History, University of Sheffield
 
Moderator/ChairRiccardo Saccenti, Fondazione per le Scienze Religiose Giovanni XXIII, Bologna / Istituto di Storia dell'Europa Mediterranea, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Cagliari
 
Paper 1133-a The Problem of Lazarus's Will: The Legal Hermeneutics of Bertram of Metz
(Language: English)
Bruce C. Brasington, Department of History, West Texas A&M University, Canyon
Index Terms: Canon Law; Law; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1133-b C. Intelleximus (X 5.32.1) and the Reception of Roman Law to Canon Law in the Light of 13th-Century Canon Law Jurisprudence
(Language: English)
Piotr Alexandrowicz, Faculty of Law & Administration, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań
Index Terms: Canon Law; Law; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractThe anonymous cleric who wrote the Anglo-Norman treatise, Ordo Bambergensis, undoubtedly spoke for many who studied and practiced canon law in the late 12th century. The increasingly formal study of both the civil and canon laws had revealed the silences of the latter on many aspects of the law, notably legal procedure. Sometimes the civil law could be easily integrated into the canons; at other points, it was either contrasted or superseded by them. The proposed session explores the relevance, and 'otherness' of the civil law to the canon law, both in study and practice, from the time around the appearance of Gratian's Decretum, ca. 1140 and into the later Middle Ages.