Session216
TitleBorders and Borderlands in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, II: Nations and Allies in Late Medieval Britain
Date/TimeMonday 3 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorCentre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
 
OrganiserHelen Fulton, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
 
Moderator/ChairJames Doherty, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
 
Paper 216-a Attitudes to Immigrants in Later Medieval England: A Microhistorical Approach
(Language: English)
W. Mark Ormrod, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Index Terms: Economics - Urban; Geography and Settlement Studies; Historiography - Medieval; Social History
Paper 216-b La Vie du Prince Noir and the Death of the Black Prince: Memorialization in Late Medieval England
(Language: English)
Daniel Davies, Department of English, University of Pennsylvania
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Political Thought
Paper 216-c Fighting for England, Winning in Wales: Political Poetry and Cross-Border Factionalism in 15th-Century Wales
(Language: English)
Helen Fulton, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Celtic; Political Thought; Social History
 
AbstractThis is the second of three sessions on 'Borders and Borderlands in Medieval and Early Modern Europe'. The aim of this session is to show how cross-border allegiances in England, Scotland, and Wales refined and shaped concepts of national identity in these three nations. The presence of migrant groups in England exacerbated existing social divisions but also contributed to the growing English nationalism, while in Scotland the alliance with France produced a new sense of identity. In Wales, political poetry helped to cement factions of Welsh and English led by various Marcher lords, preparing the ground for the civil wars of the 15th century.