Session844
TitleThe Way in from Outside: Dante and Franciscan Theologians on the Path to Salvation
Date/TimeTuesday 4 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserJason Aleksander, College of Letters & Sciences, National University, California
 
Moderator/ChairClaire E. Honess, School of Languages, Cultures & Societies - Italian, University of Leeds
 
Paper 844-a Why Did God Become a Human Being?: Dante's Atonement Theology
(Language: English)
Dabney Park, Department of Modern Languages & Literatures, University of Miami
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Italian; Philosophy; Theology
Paper 844-b The Figure of Rhipeus and the Divine Comedy's Tacit Principles of Inclusion in and Exclusion from the Mystical Body of the Church
(Language: English)
Jason Aleksander, College of Letters & Sciences, National University, California
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Italian; Philosophy; Theology
Paper 844-c Who's In and Who's Out?: John Duns Scotus, Political Power, and Expulsion
(Language: English)
Ryan Thornton, Centre de Recherches Historiques, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
Index Terms: Philosophy; Political Thought; Theology
 
AbstractThe practical impact of 'otherness' involves keeping some people in and pushing 'others' out of a community. The ultimate community in the Middle Ages was the community of saints, the elect group of the saved, those destined for Heaven. Consequently a central theological question of the period concerned the criteria for inclusion in the community of the elect. Dante and the Franciscans who influenced him so deeply defined an open path to salvation available to everyone, upon meeting certain conditions: they offered a way in from outside. The three papers in this session reflect on this overall theme. Two papers deal with central questions regarding the tacit theological principles of the Divine Comedy, and a third paper focuses on John Duns Scotus's political theology.