Session811
TitleLate Medieval English Manuscripts in Court and Country: The 'Other' of Miscellaneity and Purpose
Date/TimeTuesday 4 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorInstitute for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Bangor University & Aberystwyth University
 
OrganiserRaluca Radulescu, Institute for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), Bangor University
 
Moderator/ChairRaluca Radulescu, Institute for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), Bangor University
 
Paper 811-a Multilingualism in English Books: Re-Opening London, British Library MS Harley 2253
(Language: English)
Rory Critten, Section d'anglais, Université de Lausanne
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 811-b Hoccleve's Interests in the Arrangement of Huntington MS HM 111
(Language: English)
Dylan Mathews, School of English Literature, Bangor University
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 811-c Texts and Their Lives from Manuscript to Print: Cambridge University Library fol. 2.38
(Language: English)
Raluca Radulescu, Institute for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), Bangor University
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractThis session will look at three different moments in late medieval English manuscript culture with a view to discussing the role of multi-text books in a domestic as well as courtly context. It takes a broad view of the period 1300-1500 through three key manuscripts. The first paper, 'Multilingualism in English Books: Re-Opening London, British Library MS Harley 2253' will discuss what this manuscript can say about the relative statuses of French, Latin, and English and, in particular, the role of French within later medieval English households. The second paper, 'Hoccleve's Interests in the Arrangement of the Huntington MS HM 111' will focus, as the title suggests, on the copying of several items in this book, in particular the status of 'the other' in 'the address to Oldcastle' in a manuscript otherwise seemingly organised only around plea-making and self-reflection poems. The third paper, 'Texts and their lives from manuscript to print: CUL ff. 2.38', focuses on the reading experience of this very late miscellany, considering the interplay between domestic concerns and broader cultural and political overtones ('the other', i.e. non-conformist, element) in this book at the end of the 15th century - and the advent of print. In all, this session starts with a focus on the household, then moves to courtly circles, and comes back to the household book, tackling recent debates on insular miscellanies and anthologies and their uses.

Participants include: Rory Critten (Universität Bern), Dylan Mathews (Bangor University), and Raluca Radulescu (Bangor University)