Session1631
TitleViolence and Order in the Medieval World
Date/TimeThursday 6 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorCalifornia Institute of Technology / Huntington Library Humanities Collaboration 'Violence & Order, Past & Present'
 
OrganiserLeah Klement, Division of the Humanities & Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology / Huntington Library, California
 
Moderator/ChairWarren Brown, Division of the Humanities & Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology
 
Paper 1631-a Setting the Saxons up for Success: Violence and Coercion during the Conversion of the Saxons, 772-804
(Language: English)
Jan van Doren, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Law; Political Thought
Paper 1631-b Citizenship, Indigeneity, and the Ethics of Violence in Arnulf of Orléans's Commentary on Lucan
(Language: English)
Leah Klement, Division of the Humanities & Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology / Huntington Library, California
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Latin; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Political Thought
Paper 1631-c Is There a Case for a Minimalist View of Anglo-Saxon Law?
(Language: English)
Paul R. Hyams, Department of History, Cornell University / Pembroke College, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Law; Political Thought
 
AbstractThe Middle Ages are often invoked by the media, politicians, and even scholars of the modern world as an era of unrestrained violence. However, as scholars of medieval violence have shown, violence in the Middle Ages was often highly regulated, and intersected in complex ways with social, legal, and religious institutions. This session will explore the variety of attitudes toward violence and social order in the medieval world, working toward a better understanding of the purposes of violence in the Middle Ages, and of modern interpretations (or misinterpretations) of those ideas.