Session620
TitleGender, Sexuality, and Medieval 'Otherness' in Medieval and Modern Literature
Date/TimeTuesday 4 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserAmy Burge, College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Edinburgh
 
Moderator/ChairRachel E. Moss, History Department, University of Northampton
 
Paper 620-a A Tale of Two Kings: Masculinity, Race, and the Medieval in C. S. Pacat's Captive Prince Trilogy
(Language: English)
Amy Brown, Département de langue et littérature anglaises, Université de Genève
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Medievalism and Antiquarianism; Sexuality
Paper 620-b Opposites Attract: Reading Sex and Gender in Medieval and Modern Romance and Advice Literature
(Language: English)
Amy Burge, College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Edinburgh
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Language and Literature - Middle English; Medievalism and Antiquarianism; Sexuality
Paper 620-c Say Yes to the Dress: Using Maid Marian and Medievalism to Interrogate the Present-as-Past
(Language: English)
Valerie B. Johnson, Department of English & Foreign Languages, University of Montevallo
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Medievalism and Antiquarianism
 
AbstractGender has generally been conceived of as binary - masculinity and femininity are defined by their difference from one another. So too has the Middle Ages been seen as 'other' - strange and unfamiliar to an apparently more liberated 'modernity'. The three papers in this session deal with these connected strands of 'otherness' - gender and the 'medieval'. Featuring papers on masculinity, orientalism, and the imagined medieval past as a space of sexual otherness; medieval and modern advice literature and narratives of sexual progress; and female cross-dressing in postmedieval Robin Hood, the panel fundamentally asks: what does such alterity reveal about our medieval and modern selves?