Session838
TitleCivic Identity on the Edge?, II: Cultural Institutions and Beneficiaries in Late Medieval Hull
Date/TimeTuesday 4 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorUniversity of Hull
 
OrganiserSarah McKeon, Department of History, University of Hull
Elisabeth Salter, 'Gender, Place & Memory, 1400-1900' Research Cluster, University of Hull
 
Moderator/ChairElisabeth Salter, 'Gender, Place & Memory, 1400-1900' Research Cluster, University of Hull
 
RespondentRosemary Horrox, Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 838-a The Hull Charterhouse through Time, 1378-1651
(Language: English)
Stewart J. Mottram, Department of English, University of Hull
Index Terms: Architecture - Religious; Language and Literature - Middle English; Lay Piety; Local History
Paper 838-b Book Culture and Civic Identity: Evidence for the Circulation of Texts between London, Hull, and Beyond, c. 1400-1550
(Language: English)
Sarah McKeon, Department of History, University of Hull
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Middle English; Lay Piety; Local History
 
AbstractThis is one of two linked sessions celebrating the late medieval heritage of Hull to mark the city's year as UK City of Culture, 2017. Dr Stewart Mottram will discuss the material remains and devotional legacy of the Hull Charterhouse, and of Hull Carthusian culture, from the establishment of the Carthusian priory at Hull in 1378 (and of the hospital in 1384), to its destruction, and then subsequent restoration (in part), during the civil wars of the 1640s and early 1650s. Mottram will discuss both the archaeological remains of Carthusian culture and the intriguing evidence of Reverend Andrew Marvell's MS sermon book as indicative of the type of religious and devotional practice that was popular in Hull. Dr Sarah McKeon will discuss a range of literary and devotional books that moved in and out of Hull courtesy of the town's inhabitants. She will examine the significance of the evidence contained in a book list belonging to John Spalding, a vicar at Hull Charterhouse, who carried a collection of books from London to Hull Charterhouse in the 16th century as well as considering the books owned by members of the civic lay and merchant community such as Agnes Swan and John Bedford.