Session817
TitleThe Role of the European Borders in the New Perceptions of the Othering at Late Middle Ages
Date/TimeTuesday 4 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorInstituto Universitario de Estudios Medievales y Renacentistas (CEMYR), Universidad de La Laguna
 
OrganiserRoberto J. González Zalacain, Instituto de Estudios Medievales y Renacentistas, Universidad de La Laguna
 
Moderator/ChairVictòria A. Burguera i Puigserver, Departament de Ciències Històriques i Teoria de les Arts, Universitat de les Illes Balears / Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona
 
Paper 817-a Facing Otherness: Fluctuating Perceptions of the Muslim Sultanates of the Mediterranean in the Diplomatic Documentation of the Crown of Aragon, 14th and 15th Centuries
(Language: English)
Marta Manso Rubio, Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona
Index Terms: Anthropology; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 817-b Two Worlds, One Contact: The Arrival of Europeans to the Canary Islands and Its Iconographic Representation on the Miniatures of 'Le Canarien'
(Language: English)
Kevin Rodríguez Wittmann, Instituto de Estudios Medievales y Renacentistas, Universidad de La Laguna
Index Terms: Anthropology; Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 817-c Perceptions of the Sea in Castilian Royal Chronicles, c. 1350-1420: Sea Travel, Piracy, and Naval Warfare
(Language: English)
Víctor Muñoz-Gómez, Departamento de Geografía e Historia, Facultad de Humanidades / Instituto de Estudios Medievales y Renacentistas, Universidad de La Laguna
Index Terms: Anthropology; Historiography - Medieval; Maritime and Naval Studies; Military History
 
AbstractIn the Late Middle Ages the European Borders were in expansion. Through the South Atlantic, the expeditions engaged by the Iberian crowns, especially Castile and Portugal, opened new scenes to the contact between cultures, which modified the perception of othering in Christianity. Meanwhile, in the traditional maritime borders, basically in Mare Nostrum but also at North Atlantic, the relationships between people with different origins and religions performed new images of otherness, in a complex process of reconstruction of the concept. With this session we want to go into detail of that process in some specific contexts, all around the maritime frontiers.