Session1043
TitleLies and Liars in the Middle Ages: Perceptions and Punishments
Date/TimeWednesday 5 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserOle-Albert Rønning, Institutt for arkeologi, konservering og historie, Universitetet i Oslo
 
Moderator/ChairRagnhild Marthine Bø, Institutt for arkeologi, konservering og historie, Universitetet i Oslo / Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London
 
Paper 1043-a What Makes a Liar: Half-Truths and How to Get Away with Them in Old Norse Saga Literature
(Language: English)
Beate Albrigtsen Pedersen, Institutt for arkeologi, konservering og historie, Universitetet i Oslo
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Mentalities
Paper 1043-b Pants on Fire: Sanctions and Consequences of Perjury in Medieval Norwegian Law
(Language: English)
Ole-Albert Rønning, Institutt for arkeologi, konservering og historie, Universitetet i Oslo
Index Terms: Canon Law; Law; Mentalities; Social History
Paper 1043-c Pretentions and Proofs: Dubious Claims of Kingship in High Medieval Norway
(Language: English)
Ian Peter Grohse, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Index Terms: Political Thought; Politics and Diplomacy
 
AbstractIn a society that was built on face-to-face communication and trust, the liar was dangerous. They could be a political threat, ridiculing the powerful, and a spiritual menace, whose sacrilege brought on the wrath of God. But what makes a liar? What, in the medieval context, determined whether a statement or practice was considered untrue? This session aims to approach the issue of how medieval society dealt with the problem of lies and liars, how it constructed them and reacted to them, in the realms of politics, religion, literature, and law.