Session239
TitleDigitising Patterns of Power, I: Genealogy on a Map
Date/TimeMonday 3 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorProject 'Digitising Patterns of Power (DPP): Peripherical Mountains in the Medieval World', Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
OrganiserMihailo Popović, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Moderator/ChairRosamond McKitterick, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 239-a Memoria and Self-Representation on the Example of Hans III Herzheimer
(Language: English)
Veronika Polloczek, Archiv der Diözese Gurk, Katholische Kirche Kärnten
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Genealogy and Prosopography; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Social History
Paper 239-b How to Digitise Genealogical Data with the OpenAtlas Software?: The Example of the Herzheimer Chronicle
(Language: English)
Bernhard Koschicek-Krombholz, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Genealogy and Prosopography; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Social History
Paper 239-c Cartographic Aspects: Interactive Mapping of History and Cartographic Principles
(Language: English)
Markus Breier, Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung, Universität Wien
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 239-d Using Recogito for Annotation and Mapping of Historical Sources
(Language: English)
Rainer Simon, Digital Insight Lab, Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT), Wien
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Geography and Settlement Studies
 
AbstractThe project 'Digitising Patterns of Power (DPP)' is hosted at the Institute for Medieval Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and unites as a cluster project various experts from the fields of Medieval History, Byzantine Studies, Historical Geography, Archaeology, Geography, Cartography, Geographical Information Science (GISc), and Software Engineering. DPP compares five regions of the Medieval World, which on the one hand have their specific written and archaeological sources documenting different forms of 'otherness' (e.g. in power enforcement, political or ecclesiastical patterns of power, social relations etc.), but on the other hand enable a systemic comparison through time and space.