Session112
TitleNetwork Analysis for Medieval Studies, I: Network Analysis of Medieval Charters
Date/TimeMonday 2 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorH37 - Histoire & Cultures Graphiques, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve / Centre de recherche pratiques médiévales de l'écrit (PraME), Université de Namur
 
OrganiserSébastien de Valeriola, Institut de Statistique, Biostatistique et Sciences Actuarielles, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve
Nicolas Ruffini-Ronzani, Département d'Histoire, Université de Namur
 
Moderator/ChairMatthew H. Hammond, Independent Scholar, York
 
Paper 112-a 'Et se en defaloient de cest paiement…': Personal Pledging and Social Networks, 13th Century
(Language: English)
Sébastien de Valeriola, Institut de Statistique, Biostatistique et Sciences Actuarielles, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve
Index Terms: Administration; Archives and Sources; Charters and Diplomatics; Computing in Medieval Studies
Paper 112-b Recipients and Witnesses of High Medieval Charters: A Social Network Analysis of the German Political System during the Reign of Frederick I Barbarossa, 1152-90
(Language: English)
Clemens Beck, Modelle, Erklärungen und Prozesse in den historischen Wissenschaften (MEPHisto) / Fakultät für Mathematik und Informatik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Index Terms: Administration; Archives and Sources; Charters and Diplomatics; Computing in Medieval Studies
Paper 112-c A Knowledge Base of Charters from the Regesta Imperii for Generating Networks in Medieval Social and Constitutional History
(Language: English)
Christian Knüpfer, Institut für Informatik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Index Terms: Administration; Charters and Diplomatics; Computing in Medieval Studies; Social History
 
AbstractThe techniques and the conceptual framework of network analysis have recently found their way into historical scholarship. Several important endeavours, such as the establishment of the Journal of Historical Network Research, testify to the growing interest of historians in network analysis and more generally in structured relational data. This panel, intended as the inception of a series recurring annually at the IMC, aims at gathering some of the otherwise rather dispersed papers building on network analysis, applying this methodology to medieval material, bringing palpable results of interest to scholars from the respective fields of expertise, and promoting comparison and debate. This year's sessions pay special attention to processes of governance accessed through networks extracted from diplomatic sources, and to medieval learning and intertextuality accessed through networks of manuscripts, authors, and citations.