Session349
TitleMappings, I: Maps in Communication with (Other) Texts
Date/TimeMonday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
Dan Terkla, Department of English, Illinois Wesleyan University
 
Moderator/ChairFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
 
Paper 349-a Heart of Darkness: Antonio Fernandez's Exploration of the Southern African Interior in 1514 Revisited
(Language: English)
Thomas Wozniak, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 349-b Coastal Lines on Late Medieval Maps as Transitional Zones
(Language: English)
Gerda Brunnlechner, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 349-c Maps and Their Materiality: Revisiting the Two Mappaemundi of London, British Library Add MS 28681
(Language: English)
LauraLee Brott, Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Heather Gaile Wacha, School of Library & Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractMedieval maps are multimedia phenomena. They rely to varying degrees on visual and verbal signs in their topographical descriptions of unknown continents, specifically rendered coastlines, and at the interplay of drawn-and-painted maps and toponym lists. This session's case studies shed light on how little-known exploration records were used to draw maps of previously unknown territories, how the interplay of graphical and textual signs (e.g. coastal lines) works on medieval maps of all types, and how a fresh examination of adjacent mappaemundi in a 13th-century psalter reveals the need for redating their creation and re-assessing their codicological significance.