Session324
TitleDigital Materiality, II: How to Represent Materiality Digitally in Palaeography and Codicology?
Date/TimeMonday 1 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorDigital Medievalist
 
OrganiserRoman Bleier, Zentrum für Informationsmodellierung, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
 
Moderator/ChairSean Winslow, Zentrum für Informationsmodellierung, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
 
Paper 324-a Modelling Writing: Towards a Conceptual Reference Model for Palaeography
(Language: English)
Peter A. Stokes, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Études, Université Paris Sciences & Lettres
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 324-b Book Covers as Material Objects: Possibilities and Challenges in the Brave New Digital World
(Language: English)
Carolin Schreiber, Manuscripts & Rare Books, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 324-c On the Epistemological Limits of Automatic Classification of Scripts
(Language: English)
Marc H. Smith, École Nationale des Chartes, Paris
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractWriting on parchment or paper sets the physical foundation of most of the texts and images we study as medievalists. For a long period digital methods seemed to penalize the physical features. Lately, research endeavours have started to tackle also the material features of text-bearing objects and the material form of texts. Computer vision and formal modelling are at the core of these approaches. The session will showcase these approaches in the field of palaeography and codicology. Carolin Schreiber will report on the development of a modular standard of description for elaborate book covers, e.g. treasure bindings, which includes a Linked Open Data approach and multilingual General Subject and Iconographic Thesaurus as well as analytical methods like spectroscopy. Peter Stokes tries to clarify the fundamental concepts necessary to measure paleography. Marc Smith will discuss the consequences of AI-based methods in the classification of scripts.