Session1511
TitleManaging God's Wrath: Socio-Cultural Responses to the Impacts of Environmental Disasters in Central and South-Eastern Europe
Date/TimeThursday 8 July 2021: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorDepartment of History / Centre for the Study of the Balkans, Goldsmiths, University of London
 
OrganiserNada Zečević, Department of History / Centre for the Study of the Balkans, Goldsmiths, University of London
 
Moderator/ChairMihailo Popović, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Paper 1511-a 'Then, just like now': Famine, Floods, and Other Disasters in Medieval Zagreb and Its County
(Language: English)
Suzana Miljan, Institute of Historical & Social Sciences, Croatian Academy of Sciences & Arts
Index Terms: Administration; Daily Life; Economics - Urban; Social History
Paper 1511-b Visualising God's Wrath: Environmental Problems Displayed in Images
(Language: English)
Gerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien
Index Terms: Art History - General; Daily Life; Mentalities; Social History
Paper 1511-c The Kiss of Death: Balkan Émigrés and the Transmission of Infectious Diseases in Habsburg Hungary, 17th-18th Centuries
(Language: English)
Nada Zečević, Department of History / Centre for the Study of the Balkans, Goldsmiths, University of London
Index Terms: Daily Life; Medicine; Mentalities; Social History
 
AbstractGreatly dependent on their natural environment, people of pre-modern Europe were highly vulnerable to its sudden changes. While these changes were usually perceived as justifiable and deserved godly wrath, people of the time devised various ways to neutralise its effects. This session explores societal responses to the impacts of extreme environmental processes in late-medieval and early-modern Central and South-eastern Europe. During the Middle Ages and the early-modern period, these regions were frequently seen as borderlands between the continent's East and West and rural, somewhat 'forgotten' peripheries. The session's key focus is on societal institutes and devices which the people of these areas used to respond and adapt themselves to the risks which the nature put before them. By comparatively following diverse experiences of handling famine, flood, infectious diseases, and other environmental disasters, the session draws a map of the region's social abilities to efficiently manage environmental crisis, by which community cohesion, collective sense of place and notions of common belonging were constructed and transferred to the modern mentalities.