Session1501
TitleBetween Byzantium and Sasanian Persia, I: Settlement and Movement within the Limits of Ērānshahr and the Eastern Roman Empire
Date/TimeThursday 8 July 2021: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorBritish Institute of Persian Studies (BIPS) / Cardiff Centre of Late Antique Religion & Culture, Cardiff University
 
OrganiserDomiziana Rossi, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Sean Strong, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
 
Moderator/ChairEve MacDonald, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
 
Paper 1501-a Between the Hammer and the Anvil: Byzantium, Sasanians, and North Syrian Trade in the 6th Century
(Language: English)
Khodadad Rezakhani, Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS), Universiteit Leiden
Index Terms: Byzantine Studies; Economics - Trade; Economics - Urban; Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 1501-b How Did the Environment Affect the Spread of the So-Called Justinianic Plague?: New Reflections on Settlements and Movements between Persia and Byzantium
(Language: English)
Domiziana Rossi, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index Terms: Archaeology - Sites; Byzantine Studies; Demography; Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 1501-c Trades along the Eastern Frontier: The Pottery Evidence from South-Eastern Anatolia, 250-500
(Language: English)
Merve Ipek, Department of Archaeology, Ondokuz Mayıs University / Archaeological Mission, Blaundos
Davide Polimeno, Archeologia, Direcione delle Antiquità, Ministero della Cultura, Lecce
Index Terms: Archaeology - Artefacts; Archaeology - Sites; Byzantine Studies; Economics - Urban
 
AbstractThis session analyses the climate of trade, economics, and patterns of human and physical settlements in the Near East during Late Antiquity. The movement of people and materials has often been overlooked despite it playing a key role, especially along the limes. This created a dynamic climate of interconnectivity throughout the Near East. The enforcement of certain trade routes not only developed economic patterns but also impacted the demography and the spread of pestilence between the Eastern Roman Empire and Ērānshahr. This panel aims to bring new research to the field and examine certain aspects of this interconnectivity.