Session1517
TitleLoss and Transmission: Quantitative Approaches to Modelling the Dissemination and Survival of Medieval Literature
Date/TimeThursday 8 July 2021: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserJean-Baptiste Camps, École Nationale des Chartes, Paris
Mike Kestemont, Departement Letterkunde, Universiteit Antwerpen
 
Moderator/ChairKirsten Wallenwein, Lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Historischen Seminar / Sonderforschungsbereich 933 'Material Text Cultures', Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
 
Paper 1517-a On the Extinction of Medieval Texts
(Language: English)
Jean-Baptiste Camps, École Nationale des Chartes, Paris
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1517-b A Dynamic Model of Manuscript Transmission
(Language: English)
Julien Randon-Furling, Statistique, Analyse et Modélisation Multidisciplinaire (EA 4543), Université Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne / Fédération Parisienne de Modélisation Mathématique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1517-c Unseen Species Models from Ecology to Estimate the Losses of Medieval Literature: Advances in an International Comparison
(Language: English)
Mike Kestemont, Departement Letterkunde, Universiteit Antwerpen
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractUnderstanding the dynamics of manuscript transmission and estimating the losses of medieval texts and manuscripts are fundamental issues, albeit hard to tackle. The available material evidence is scant, making it hard to identify robust patterns, especially using conventional philological instruments. Mathematical models and computer simulations can contribute novel perspectives and complement existing knowledge. Indeed, combining machine learning and mathematical modelling inspired by the natural sciences offers new tools for the Digital Humanities and new insights into the complex transmission of the medieval textual heritage. This session's papers present a set of bold quantitative approaches of this important phenomenon.