Session1630
TitleTrust across Borders, I
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserAnnabel Hancock, St John's College, University of Oxford
Siyao Jiang, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
 
Moderator/ChairCatherine Holmes, University College, University of Oxford
 
RespondentCatherine Holmes, University College, University of Oxford
 
Paper 1630-a A Comparison of Trusting Behaviour between Chinese Maritime Merchants, Foreign Merchants, and the Chinese Hinterland, 13th-14th Centuries
(Language: English)
Siyao Jiang, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Economics - Trade; Economics - Urban; Social History
Paper 1630-b 'Dicam et scribam veritatem': Trust in Agreements between Merchants in Barcelona and Mallorca, 1240-1350
(Language: English)
Annabel Hancock, St John's College, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Economics - Trade; Maritime and Naval Studies; Social History
Paper 1630-c Edward II's Domestic Creditors: Loans from the City of London to the Crown, 1307-1327
(Language: English)
Sharon Mallen, Independent Scholar, Banbridge
Robin McCallum, Independent Scholar, Belfast
Index Terms: Economics - General; Economics - Urban
 
AbstractThe first of two sessions explores historical trust. This panel looks at trust between various social groups, including merchant communities in global context, in south-eastern China, western Mediterranean, and London during the 13th and 14th centuries. The first paper seeks to analyse how varied trust was practiced in Chinese port cities during the Song and Yuan dynasties through a comparative study of three border-crossing groups: Chinese maritime merchants, foreign merchants, and Chinese residents from inland agricultural towns. The second paper examines trading contracts in Barcelona and Mallorca to explore the formation of individual trusting relationships. It seeks to investigate how factors such as faith, gender, and citizenship affected trust-making practices. The third paper examines the loans from the City of London and its residents to the crown between 1307 and 1327 for the defence of the kingdom. It traces the origins of this new financial policy to the political crisis of 1310-11 during the reign of Edward II.