Session815
TitleConflict and Integration: Crossing Medieval Borders, IV - Geographical Borders, the Medieval British Isles, and the 'Other'
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorQueen's University Belfast
 
OrganiserElisa Ramazzina, Faculty of English, University of Oxford / School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen's University Belfast
 
Moderator/ChairFrancis Leneghan, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford
 
Paper 815-a Early Medieval Welsh Ethnogenesis: A Story Carved in Parchment and Stone?
(Language: English)
Donato Sitaro, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università degli Studi di Napoli - Federico II
Index Terms: Anthropology; Epigraphy; Historiography - Medieval
Paper 815-b Monsters at the Borders: The Early Medieval English Wonders of the East and World Maps
(Language: English)
Elisa Ramazzina, Faculty of English, University of Oxford / School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen's University Belfast
Index Terms: Anthropology; Geography and Settlement Studies; Language and Literature - Old English
Paper 815-c Punishing Wrongdoing and the Border of the Danelaw
(Language: English)
Jake A. Stattel, Trinity College, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Old English; Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Law
Paper 815-d The Circulation and Integration of Medical Knowledge across Borders: The Old Norse Materia medica
(Language: English)
Luthien Cangemi, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Language and Literature - Old English; Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Medicine
 
AbstractThis fourth session examines the role of international, internal and regional medieval British borders and their relationship with the 'Other' from different perspectives. Paper -a explores early medieval Welsh ethnogenesis through epigraphic and historiographic documents, focussing on the porous borders of Britons' ethnic self-perception. Paper -b examines the relation of borders, monstrosity, and 'otherness' in the Old English versions of the 'Wonders of the East' in both texts and illustrations, comparing it to relevant medieval English world maps. Paper -c explores what it meant to cross the legal boundary of the Danelaw, particularly in the domain of criminal justice, demonstrating that criminal law was applied in decisively different ways depending upon which side of the border one was on. Finally, Paper -d aims at framing Icelandic materia medica as a pan-European healing system, strongly rooted on Judeo-Christian liturgy and providing insights into a possible English-Norwegian stream of circulation of medical knowledge in medieval Iceland, representing a way for Icelanders to further integrate into Christendom and to foster a mutual dialogue with the Continent and England.