Session1723
TitleBordering the Crusades, III: Historical Writing on the Frontier
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserAndrew David Buck, School of Archaeology, History, & Religion, Cardiff University
Katy Mortimer, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
 
Moderator/ChairBeth Spacey, School of Historical & Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland
 
Paper 1723-a Writing Loss on the Frontier: The Historia regum Hierusalem Latinorum ad deplorationem perditionis terrae sanctae accomodata and the Fall of Jerusalem
(Language: English)
Andrew David Buck, School of Archaeology, History, & Religion, Cardiff University
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 1723-b 'Etiam ad orientis interiora potuissent penetrare': (Re)Imagining Outremer in the Latin Continuation of William of Tyre
(Language: English)
James Henry Kane, College of Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 1723-c The Memory of Caffaro: Jacopo Doria's Genoese Civic Annals (1280-1293) and the Genoese Presence in the Latin East in the Later 13th Century
(Language: English)
Susannah Bain, Faculty of History / Jesus College, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin
 
AbstractThis panel considers the issue of crusading borders by focusing upon processes of historical writing on or about the eastern frontiers of Latin Christendom across the traditional crusading period of the 12th and 13th centuries. It does in two ways: firstly, by considering texts composed within the Latin East; and secondly, exploring those written about the settlements of Outremer. In doing so, it will help to contribute to wider historiographical discussions on the ways in which the Frankish presence in the East impacted upon how Latin Christian historical authors conceptualised recording the past. Paper -a thus explores William of Tyre's Chronicon, and considers the ways in which the famous Jerusalemite author sought to explain and legitimise the conquest and creation of Outremer through his use of the translatio imperii motif when forging an account of the First Crusade. Paper -b turns to the so-called 'Latin Continuation of William of Tyre', produced in England at the turn of the 13th century, and considers how its anonymous author utilised both Angevin sources and William of Tyre's text to construct a particular vision of Outremer when narrating the Third Crusade. Paper -c discusses the Genoese Civic Annals, which cover (amongst other things) events in the East across the crusading period; and considers how the text's final contributor, Jacopo Doria, drew inspiration from its progenitor (and crusade veteran) Caffaro and detailed the fall of the Latin East.