Session1523
TitleBordering the Crusades, I: Writing in the Margins
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserKaty Mortimer, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Stephen J. Spencer, Department of History, King's College London
 
Moderator/ChairAndrew T. Jotischky, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
 
Paper 1523-a The Permeability of Textual Borders in Manuscripts of Crusade Letters
(Language: English)
Thomas W. Smith, History Department, Rugby School
Index Terms: Crusades; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1523-b Misinterpreting the Margins?: Reconsidering Marginal Comments in the Only Witness for De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi
(Language: English)
Katy Mortimer, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1523-c The Third Crusade and the Rewriting of History in Medieval England
(Language: English)
Stephen J. Spencer, Department of History, King's College London
Index Terms: Crusades; Language and Literature - Latin; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractThe papers in this session consider the intersection between manuscript boarders and narrative in works pertaining to the crusades. Paper -a explores the malleability of textual borders within the context of crusades letters by looking at how texts such as these were constructed and altered in their manuscript contexts, in particular focusing on the First Crusade Laodicea Letter and the papal bull Audita Tremendi. Paper -b discusses a marginal annotation in the only extant witness to the Second Crusade source De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi and will discuss how reinterpreting this comment might shed light on some of the 'mysteries' of the text. Paper -c focuses on the earliest manuscript of Richard of Devizes' account of the Third Crusade by examining the extensive marginalia and revision of the account, and how this sheds light on the dissemination of information in 12th-century England.