Session328
TitleOrders at Borders: Mendicants and Border Societies in Medieval Europe
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserRobert Friedrich, Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine Geschichte des Mittelalters, Universität Greifswald
 
Moderator/ChairSandra Schieweck, Abteilung Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
 
Paper 328-a Between Borders and Frontiers: Friars in the Iberian Peninsula
(Language: English)
Francisco García-Serrano, Division of Humanities, Saint Louis University, Madrid
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Monasticism; Religious Life
Paper 328-b Organising Society / Representing Kingship: The Mendicants and the Aragonese Conquest of Sardinia, c. 1320-1340
(Language: English)
Robert Friedrich, Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine Geschichte des Mittelalters, Universität Greifswald
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Monasticism; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 328-c Political Consequences of Dominican Foundations in the Border Area of Polonia and Teutonia
(Language: English)
Cornelia Linde, Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine Geschichte des Mittelalters, Universität Greifswald
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Monasticism; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 328-d Friars on the Borders of the Far North: The Mendicants and Their Provinces of Dacia
(Language: English)
Johnny Grandjean Gøgsig Jakobsen, Institut for Nordiske Studier og Sprogvidenskab (NorS), Københavns Universitet
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Monasticism
 
AbstractThe provinces of the Mendicant Orders proposed a radical new way of organising space in medieval Europe that differed considerably from the former political and ecclesiastical borders. The session explores how these conflicting borders influenced political decision-making both within the order and in relation to secular rulers. Two of the proposed case studies use the Iberian Peninsula as an example of friars in a Mediterranean border context. The third moves to Central Europe at the border of the provinces of Polonia and Teutonia whereas the last one goes further north to the Scandinavian peninsula. This wide geographical range allows an analysis in a comparative European perspective.