Session734
TitleMappings, III: Mental Borders on Maps - Human Difference, Sanctity, and Salvific Energy
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorReading Medieval Maps, Brill
 
OrganiserFelicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität in Hagen
Dan Terkla, Department of English, Illinois Wesleyan University
 
Moderator/ChairDan Terkla, Department of English, Illinois Wesleyan University
 
Paper 734-a Spatialising Difference on the Borders of Medieval World Maps
(Language: English)
Marianne O'Doherty, Department of English, University of Southampton
Index Terms: Anthropology; Geography and Settlement Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 734-b The Borders of the Holy Land as Represented on a Medieval Hebrew Map
(Language: English)
Amichay Schwartz, Department of Israel Heritage, Ariel University / Department of Land of Israel Studies & Archaeology, Bar-Ilan University
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Hebrew and Jewish Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 734-c Drawing Boundaries, Crossing Borders: Locomotion on Images of the Holy Land as a Way of Transmitting the Experience of Pilgrimage
(Language: English)
Raoul DuBois, Deutsches Seminar, Universität Zürich
Index Terms: Art History - General; Geography and Settlement Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Religious Life
 
AbstractMedieval maps and their graphically unique ways of entangling text, image, space, and time were used to clarify and define myriad concepts and beliefs in the lives of their Jewish and Christian creators and viewers. Paper -a investigates maps' unique ability to systemize and spatialize human difference, othering, in ways that other collaborations of text and image are unable to do. Paper -b examines the overlooked 16th-century manuscript of the 14th-century treatise, Kaftor Vaferach, written by Ashtori Ha-Parḥi, a Provençal Jew, and its variant copy of Rashi's 11th-century map to argue that missing paragraphs from the treatise can be reconstructed when taking the map into account. Paper -c demonstrates how detailed depictions of locomotion in Holy Land pilgrimage accounts enabled the transmission of the physical pilgrimage experience to readers.