Session1338
TitleWriting across Borders: Scribal Practices in Galicia and Portugal during the 12th Century
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorERC Project 'The Secret Life of Writing: People, Script & Ideas in the Iberian Peninsula, 900-1200'
 
OrganiserAinoa Castro Correa, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad de Salamanca
 
Moderator/ChairWendy Davies, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
 
Paper 1338-a The Switch of Two Kingdoms: An Historical Approach to the Galician-Portuguese Territorial Identity up to the 12th Century
(Language: English)
Daniel Justo Sánchez, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y Contemporánea, Universidad de Salamanca
Index Terms: Local History; Mentalities; Social History
Paper 1338-b Writing across the Miño: (Re-)Assessing Writing Practices in Galicia and Portugal before 1200
(Language: English)
Francisco José Álvarez López, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y Contemporánea, Universidad de Salamanca
Index Terms: Charters and Diplomatics; Local History; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1338-c From Monastic to Parochial Schools, North and South of the Miño: Notes on Rural Scribes in the 12th-Century Northwest
(Language: English)
Ainoa Castro Correa, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad de Salamanca
Index Terms: Charters and Diplomatics; Literacy and Orality; Local History; Manuscripts and Palaeography
 
AbstractAround the middle of the 12th century the territories south of the river Miño were finally recognised as the independent Kingdom of Portugal. Afonso Henriques' determination put an end to the illusory political unity of north-western Iberia which had concealed what in practice was a reality: that the natural border kept apart two different, albeit closely related, territories with their own peculiarities. From this starting point, this session aims to explore the concept of the Galician-Portuguese border as a barrier of identities, delving into the writing practices developed in rural contexts north and south of the river, before and after Portuguese independence.