Session1323
TitleBorders in Medieval Islam, II: The Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserAndrew Marsham, Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge
 
Moderator/ChairAmira K. Bennison, Department of Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 1323-a Cotton Roads: Crossing the Indian Ocean
(Language: English)
Maria Gajewska, Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Economics - Trade; Islamic and Arabic Studies; Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 1323-b Passing Ships, or Frogs around a Pond: Interactions between Ifriqiya and Southern Italy in the Early Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Caroline J. Goodson, Faculty of History / King's College, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Byzantine Studies; Historiography - Modern Scholarship; Islamic and Arabic Studies; Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 1323-c Were There Strategic Considerations in the 7th-Century Arabian Conquests?
(Language: English)
Andrew Marsham, Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies; Maritime and Naval Studies; Military History; Politics and Diplomacy
 
AbstractThe Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean were two of the main maritime spaces between the medieval central Islamic lands and their non-Muslim neighbours. Gajewska shows how the Indian Ocean cotton trade crossed political, cultural, and religious borders, tying the western Indian Ocean into a network whose significance remains mostly unexplored. Likewise, surprisingly little is known about the interactions between communities in North Africa and Italy in the early Middle Ages; Goodson suggests means for analysis and models for understanding these relationships. Marsham explores the Levant and the Mediterranean as spaces for strategic thinking on the part of the Umayyad elite.