Session722
TitleBorders and the Construction of Identity in the Central and Late Middle Ages
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserSusannah Bain, Faculty of History / Jesus College, University of Oxford
Teresa Barucci, Gonville & Caius College, University of Cambridge
 
Moderator/ChairSusannah Bain, Faculty of History / Jesus College, University of Oxford
 
Paper 722-a The Proprietates Anglicorum: Political Satire, Borders, and Identity in 14th-Century France
(Language: English)
Teresa Barucci, Gonville & Caius College, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Daily Life; Language and Literature - Latin; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Social History
Paper 722-b The Borders of Identity in Matthew Paris
(Language: English)
Bethany Summerfield, Department of History, Aberystwyth University
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Language and Literature - Latin; Literacy and Orality; Social History
 
AbstractThis session engages with how and why 'borders' of different kinds (such as geographical, political, and linguistic) were used in the construction of individual and group identities in the central and later Middle Ages. Paper A considers the use of different types of metaphorical borders in a 14th-century satirical prose written by a French scholar against the English (Teresa Barucci). Paper B considers the importance of metaphorical and physical borders in the construction of individual identity for the 13th-century English chronicler Matthew Paris (Bethany Summerfield).