Session326
TitleFluid Borders in the Late Medieval Adriatic: Mobility, Trade, and Social Interaction in a Shared Maritime Space, 14th-15th Centuries
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserNicolò Villanti, Historisches Institut, Universität Duisburg-Essen
 
Moderator/ChairGion Wallmeyer, Historisches Institut, Universität Duisburg-Essen
 
Paper 326-a The Discourses on the Adriatic in the Second Half of the 14th Century
(Language: English)
Dušan Mlacović, Department of History, University of Ljubljana
Index Terms: Local History; Maritime and Naval Studies; Politics and Diplomacy; Social History
Paper 326-b The New Christians of Puglia in 15th-Century Venice: Considerations on a Particular Group of Migrants
(Language: English)
Benjamin Scheller, Historisches Institut, Universität Duisburg-Essen
Index Terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies; Local History; Social History
Paper 326-c 'Io ho tanto de patrimonio in Puglia, io andarò là e staro là': Maritime Mobility and Trans-Adriatic Trade on Late Medieval Venetian Korčula
(Language: English)
Fabian Kümmeler, Institut für die Erforschung der Habsburgermonarchie und des Balkanraumes (IHB), Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index Terms: Economics - Rural; Economics - Urban; Maritime and Naval Studies; Social History
Paper 326-d Grain Trade: A Driver of Integration in the Adriatic Region in the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Nicolò Villanti, Historisches Institut, Universität Duisburg-Essen
Index Terms: Economics - General; Local History; Maritime and Naval Studies; Social History
 
AbstractThis panel re-examines the interpretation of the late medieval Adriatic as a border sea, elaborating the characteristics of an extensively and persistently integrated space of towns and villages along its eastern and western shores. Across its 'fluid frontiers', trade relations, social mobility, and legal institutions created an osmotic sphere of socio-cultural and economic interaction, while political powers repeatedly posed threats to flows of goods, people, and knowledge. Scrutinizing the maritime entanglement of Dalmatian islands and Apulian coastal towns across political borders, we offer new insights into this shared maritime space at the fringe of both late medieval East and West.