Session1135
TitleComparative Studies of Medieval England and Iceland, II: Literature
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserRebecca Drake, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
 
Moderator/ChairKatharine Marlow, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
 
RespondentBasil Arnould Price, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
 
Paper 1135-a Permeable Boundaries: The Coastal Zone in Medieval English and Old Norse-Icelandic Romance
(Language: English)
Rebecca Drake, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Language and Literature - Middle English; Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese
Paper 1135-b Imagining the British Isles in Old Norse-Icelandic Fantastical Literature
(Language: English)
Maj-Britt Frenze, Independent Scholar, Florida
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Comparative; Language and Literature - Middle English; Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 1135-c Sapientia et fortitudo in the Old Icelandic Flóamanna Saga: Folk Knowledge and Fish
(Language: English)
Lauren Poyer, Department of Scandinavian Studies, University of Washington
Index Terms: Hagiography; Language and Literature - Old English; Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 1135-d Mountains, Caves, and Snowstorms: The 'Lai of Two Lovers' in Anglo-Norman and Old Norse
(Language: English)
Erin Michelle Goeres, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
Index Terms: Administration; Language and Literature - Comparative; Language and Literature - French or Occitan; Language and Literature - Scandinavian
 
AbstractContinued interest in comparative approaches to studying medieval England and Iceland since our sessions of the same name in 2020 drives this session to once more consider the purpose of comparative studies of literature across borders from the early to late Middle Ages. Our primary question is: what can we learn about medieval English and Icelandic literature through comparison? We seek to understand how literary traditions crossed the Atlantic, and the cultural ties that enabled the exchange of literary ideas. In particular, this session focuses on how the natural environment, both landscapes and seascapes, enters medieval English and Icelandic romance.

As our respondent for this session, Basil Arnould Price brings a well-grounded knowledge of Middle English and Medieval Icelandic romance, which will broaden the session's discourse of English and Icelandic romance beyond its primary environmental focus, especially in terms of Basil's own specialism in critical race theory and gender. Moreover, Basil's response will actively draw together the findings of the session's two papers, finding their similarities and differences and drawing these out for the benefit of the session attendees. We believe that this response is integral to our comparative methodology across both of our sessions; not only do we seek to encourage comparative approaches to the various disciplines of study of medieval England and Iceland, but we also seek to encourage a comparative and connective understanding of the ideas presented in this session.